Places Known For

numerous scenes


Elizabeth City, North Carolina

National Strike Force Coordination Center located in northern Elizabeth City. Recently incorporated into the United States Department of Homeland Security, the base, along with a host of defense contractors anchored by DRS Technologies, provide a host of local jobs and maintains an influx of Coast Guard and industry employees from all around the country. The USCG Air Station and the Aviation Technical Training Center (ATTC) in Elizabeth City were featured in numerous scenes of the 2006


Romania

are Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Slovakia and Slovenia. Their CEFTA membership ended when they joined the EU. Croatia is set to join the EU in 2013. Production Cold Mountain (Cold Mountain (North Carolina)), where the film is set, is a real mountain located within the Pisgah National Forest, Haywood County, North Carolina. However, it was filmed mostly in Romania, with numerous scenes filmed in Virginia, South Carolina, and North Carolina. The film was one of an increasing number of Hollywood productions made in eastern Europe. This is occurring as a result of much lower costs in the region; and in this specific instance, Transylvania was less marked by modern life than the Appalachians (fewer power lines, electric poles, paved roads and so on). 20th century: persecution and internationalization 300px thumb Bishops of Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church. St. George's Cathedral, Lviv (File:Biskupi greckokatoliccy 1927 Lwów.jpg), Lviv 12.1927. Sitting: bp. Hryhory Khomyshyn, Metropolitan Archbishop Andrey Sheptytsky, bp. Nykyta Budka, bp. Josaphat Kotsylovsky. Ukrainian Greek Catholics found themselves under the governance of the nations of Poland, Hungary, Romania and Czechoslovakia after World War I. Under the previous century of Austrian rule, the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church attained such a strong Ukrainian national character that in the interwar Poland, the Greek Catholics of Galicia were seen by the nationalist Polish and Catholic state as even less reliable than the Orthodox Volhynians. Carrying its Polonisation policies throughout its Eastern Territories (Kresy), the Polish authorities sought to weaken the UGCC in various ways. In 1924, following a visit with the Ukrainian Catholic believers in North America and western Europe, the head of the UGCC was initially denied reentry to Lviv only being allowed back after a considerable delay. Polish (Latin Rite) Roman Catholic priests, led by their Latin bishops, began to undertake missionary work among Greek Catholics, and administrative restrictions were placed on the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church.


Switzerland

The German sport '''kegeln''' or nine-pin bowling is played with nine pins, in broadly organized leagues and is also popular in many other countries with long German connections, including Austria, Switzerland, Serbia, Slovenia, Croatia, Hungary and Liechtenstein. The game was once also the dominant bowling game in the United States (but today only survives in rural Texas), and also led to an Australian variant (#Australia). However, in February 1983, the programme "A bon entendeur" on Télévision Suisse Romande, a French language Swiss (Switzerland) TV channel, followed the route of the barrels to Saint-Quentin (Saint-Quentin, Aisne) in northern France where they disappeared. A public debate ensued in which numerous theories were put forward when it was found that Mannesmann Italiana had hired two subcontractors to get rid of the toxic waste. On May 19 the 41 barrels were found in an unused abattoir (slaughterhouse) in Anguilcourt-le-Sart, a village in northern France. From there they were transferred to a French military base near Sissonne. The Roche Group (parent firm of Givaudan) took it upon itself to properly dispose of the waste. On November 25, over nine years after the disaster, the Roche Group issued a public statement that the toxic waste consisting of 42 barrels (1 was added earlier that year) had all been incinerated in Switzerland. According to New Scientist it was thought that the high chlorine content of the waste might cause damage to the high temperature incinerator used by Roche, but Roche stated that they would burn the waste in the incinerator and repair it afterward if it were damaged. They stated that they wanted to take responsibility for the safe destruction of the waste. However, in February 1983, the programme "A bon entendeur" on Télévision Suisse Romande, a French language Swiss (Switzerland) TV channel, followed the route of the barrels to Saint-Quentin (Saint-Quentin, Aisne) in northern France where they disappeared. A public debate ensued in which numerous theories were put forward when it was found that Mannesmann Italiana had hired two subcontractors to get rid of the toxic waste. On May 19 the 41 barrels were found in an unused abattoir (slaughterhouse) in Anguilcourt-le-Sart, a village in northern France. From there they were transferred to a French military base near Sissonne. The Roche Group (parent firm of Givaudan) took it upon itself to properly dispose of the waste. On November 25, over nine years after the disaster, the Roche Group issued a public statement that the toxic waste consisting of 42 barrels (1 was added earlier that year) had all been incinerated in Switzerland. According to New Scientist it was thought that the high chlorine content of the waste might cause damage to the high temperature incinerator used by Roche, but Roche stated that they would burn the waste in the incinerator and repair it afterward if it were damaged. They stated that they wanted to take responsibility for the safe destruction of the waste. * In the Netherlands some Frisians covet an autonomous country or area (Friese beweging). *Switzerland’s division into cantons (Cantons of Switzerland) along geographical, religious and linguistic lines. Harold E. Glass, Ethnic Diversity, Elite Accommodation and Federalism in Switzerland, Publius, Vol. 7, No. 4, Federalism and Ethnicity (Autumn, 1977), 31-48. Oxford University Press. * French-speaking Quebec debating and voting on separation from Canada over several decades. It is unclear if this is a matter of ethnic, linguistic or territorial nationalism (Quebec nationalism). The reform was based on an international agreement signed in Vienna in July 1996 by the governments of the German (German language)-speaking countries of Germany, Austria, Liechtenstein and Switzerland. Luxembourg, in which German is one of the three official languages, regarded itself "as a non-German-speaking country not to be a contributory determinant upon the German system of spelling" (statement of Othon Neuen, spokesman for the Luxembourg Ministry of Education). Institution of the reform On July 1, 1996, all of the German states (''Bundesländer (States of Germany)''), and the countries of Austria, Switzerland, and Liechtenstein, as well as some other countries with German-speaking minorities (but notably not Luxembourg) agreed to introduce the new spelling by August 1, 1998. A few German Bundesländer introduced the new rules starting with the 1996–1997 school year. In Switzerland The German debate about the spelling reform produced much surprise among Swiss media companies, rather than agreement. In Switzerland, the reform has had a less noticeable impact since the letter "ß", which was the most prominent part of the reform, had not been in much use anyway. Most Swiss newspapers and magazines follow house style that, in the case of the ''Neue Zürcher Zeitung'', Switzerland's leading daily paper, diverges substantially from the official rules. The ''Schweizer Monatshefte'' company returned to the traditional Swiss spelling in 2004. Education He briefly attended schools in Switzerland and Britain (United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland), and later studied at St. Paul's School (St. Paul's School (Concord, New Hampshire)) in Concord, New Hampshire and Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where he was a classmate of Theodore Roosevelt, an editor of the Harvard Lampoon and a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon (Alpha chapter). Wister graduated from Harvard in 1882. After the arrival of steam-powered transportation, around 1825, the Grand Tour custom continued, but it was of a qualitative difference — cheaper to undertake, safer, easier, open to anyone. During much of the 19th century, most educated young men of privilege undertook the Grand Tour. Germany and Switzerland came to be included in a more broadly defined circuit. Later, it became fashionable for young women as well; a trip to Italy, with a spinster aunt as chaperon (Chaperone (social)), was part of the upper-class woman's education, as in E.M. Forster's novel ''A Room with a View''. At least into the late 1960s organized bus tours staffed by teachers took American high school graduates on eight week trips across Europe. These roughly followed the traditional route, but flying the longer segments expanded the area covered to include parts of Scandinavia. From Paris he would typically go to urban Switzerland for a while, often to Geneva (the cradle of the Protestant Reformation) or Lausanne. ("Alpinism" or mountaineering developed in the 19th century.) Sometimes he would go to Spain, to visit Barcelona, and in rare occasions, the itinerary would include Madrid and Seville. From there the traveler would endure a difficult crossing over the Alps into northern Italy (such as at the St. Bernard Pass), which included dismantling the carriage and luggage. If wealthy enough, he might be carried over the hard terrain by servants. In 1789 Madame de Genlis showed herself favourable to the French Revolution


Australia

, but the local distributor for the game backed out, believing it would probably be banned there, as well. The game was released in Great Britain, albeit with numerous scenes removed from the game by the BBFC (British Board of Film Classification). Town High School''' is a Tasmanian Government secondary school for boys. It is located in Hobart , Tasmania, Australia. It is the only public all boys


Germany

distributor for the game backed out, believing it would probably be banned there, as well. The game was released in Great Britain, albeit with numerous scenes removed from the game by the BBFC (British Board of Film Classification). location Germany , Heidenheim an der Brenz locations '''RMS ''Majestic


United States

the article. As well, despite quiescence, discussions regarding the use and standardisation of meta-templates to consistently capture this information (Wikipedia_talk:WikiProject_Countries#Infobox_redesign) are unresolved. Consider renaming to an agreeable standard. E Pluribus Anthony (User:E Pluribus Anthony) ''talk'' (User talk:E Pluribus Anthony) 09:02, 8 March 2006 (UTC) There have been numerous scenes that hint that Hayley might be bisexual. In the episode "Haylias"


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