Places Known For

heavy wooden


Guanajuato, Guanajuato

hometown. El Pípila’s strapped a large flat stone over his back and carrying a flask of tar and a torch, crawled towards the main entrance. The stone protected him from the bullets fired at him. When he reached the heavy wooden door of the entrance, he smeared it with tar and lit it. This allowed insurgents to then take the building. After the battle it was used as barracks, a tenement and tobacco warehouse. From 1864 to 1949, it was used as the state penitentiary. In 1949 the building was converted into the Museo Regional de Guanajuato, documenting the history of the area and its role in Mexican national history from the pre-Hispanic period to the present divided among fourteen halls on the upper floor. The ground floor there are large mascarons of José Mariano Jiménez, Vicente Guerrero, Ignacio Allende and Ignacio Aldama. The main hall has mascarons of Miguel Hidalgo and José María Morelos y Pavón who “guard” the national coat of arms. In front of this an eternal flame that is renewed each 28 September. The walls of the main stairwell contain mural work by José Chávez Morado that alludes to Independence. It houses a large collection of ceramics from western parts of Mesoamerica, especially from Chupícuaro (Chupícuaro (archeological site)). It also contains works by Guanajuato artist Hermeneguildo Bustos and photographer Romualdo García . There are also displays related to the building itself, both in its construction, its original function as a granary and its role in one of the first battles of the War of Independence. with my permission. I'll toy around with it until I get everything right, but I am going to go seek some help. Zach (User:Zscout370) (Smack Back) (User_talk:Zscout370) Fair use policy (WP:FU) 02:14, 8 January 2006 (UTC) ***No problem, I see now how it's working. No need to make any changes unless you decide to use the same reference for two citations. Anyway, a few more things: according to our own article on the PRI and what I've heard somewhere else (sorry, can't remember where), it's illegal to use the colors of the Mexican flag for political purposes, such as in a logo. That hasn't stopped the PRI, however. There should be some sort of reference to this law. Also, what text needs a check from Spanish to English? The quotes that appear to have been translated don't come with the original Spanish text, so I can't verify your translation. You mention that the flag change in 1968 was based on the Summer Olympics—was that because of the increased international attention or related to something else like the Tlatelolco massacre? Is the list of example locations of Banderas monumentales complete? I seem to recall seeing one of them in one of the cities surrounding Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Guanajuato). It might have been one of the semi-monumentales ones though. One more thing—I seem to recall that there was significant debate over whether the eagle in the coat of arms should face right or left, so that might be mentioned in the history section. --Spangineer (User:Spangineer) es (:es:Usuario:Spangineer)   (háblame) (User talk:Spangineer) 02:43, 8 January 2006 (UTC) ****I do not think there was a law passed, because if that was the case, the PRI would have changed their logo. I'll check my references again. As for why the change of the flag design in 1968, I do not know why it was changed exactly due to the increased international attention or the second event you said. As for the list of the locations of the banderas monumentales, I created an article separate from this one and that one, which is at Banderas monumentales, has a full list of all of their locations. I just did not want the article to become list heavy, so I forked. Zach (User:Zscout370) (Smack Back) (User_talk:Zscout370) Fair use policy (WP:FU) 03:10, 8 January 2006 (UTC) Sometimes the district office's overprint included a number designating the suboffice for which the stamps were intended, and occasionally suboffices applied their own handstamps. Larger offices had several different designs of handstamp in use; Mexico City used five different devices to handstamp the stamps of 1856, each with a different appearance, while the districts of Guadalajara (Guadalajara, Jalisco), Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Guanajuato), Puebla (Puebla, Puebla), Querétaro (Querétaro, Querétaro), and San Luis Potosí (San Luis Potosí, San Luis Potosí) each had three devices. War of Independence During the Mexican War of Independence (1810-1821), numerous mints operated, providing coins for both the supporters and opponents of the Spanish crown. The Royalist issued coins at mints in Chihuahua (Chihuahua, Chihuahua), Durango, Guadalajara (Guadalajara, Jalisco), Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Guanajuato), Nueva Viscaya (Nueva Vizcaya, New Spain), Oaxaca (Oaxaca, Oaxaca), Real del Catorce, San Fernando de Bexar (San Antonio, Texas), San Luis Potosí (San Luis Potosí, San Luis Potosí), Sombrerete, Valladolid Michoacán (Morelia) and Zacatecas (Zacatecas, Zacatecas). Most Royalist issues were similar in style to the earlier colonial issues from the Mexico City mint with no new denominations issed. 200px thumb right Juan Carlos Romero Hicks (Image:Juan Carlos Romero Hicks.jpg) '''Juan Carlos Romero Hicks''' (b. December 10, 1955 in the city of Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Guanajuato)) was the Director General of the Mexican (Mexico) Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACyT). Prior to this, he was the Governor of Guanajuato. He is a member of the National Action Party (National Action Party (Mexico)) (PAN). The '''Alhóndiga de Granaditas''' (public granary) is an old grain storage building in Guanajuato City (Guanajuato, Guanajuato), Mexico. This historic building was created to replace an old granary near the city's river. Its construction lasted from 1798 to 1809, by orders of Juan Antonio de Riaño y Bárcena, a Spaniard who was the quartermaster of the city during the Viceroyalty of New Spain (New Spain). The building received World Heritage listing as part of the Historic Town of Guanajuato in 1988. Other passenger service was provided between Mexico City and: Cuernavaca, Morelos; Tampico, Tamaulipas; Guanajuato, Guanajuato; and Veracruz, Veracruz.


Northern Wei

that the Warring-States-Era heavy wooden yoke placed around a horse's chest was replaced by the softer ''breast strap''. Later, during the Northern Wei (386–534 CE), the fully developed horse collar was invented. Needham (1986c), 308–312, 319–323. Many of the Turkic peoples have their homelands


Niue

toppings for $2). Located in South Alofi. Take a look at the heavy wooden red door on your way in - it is the last surviving door from Mt Eden Prison in Auckland. *


Norway

hunting tool—a heavy wooden club, with a hammer head (used to crush a seal's skull), and a hook (used to drag away the carcass) on the end. In Norway, and possibly elsewhere Commons:Category:Norway Dmoz:Regional Europe Norway Wikipedia:Norway


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017