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early business


Sylvan Lake, Alberta

and the businesses and homes immediately to the west. thumb left 200px Sylvan Lake Lighthouse (Image:Sylvan Lake Lighthouse.jpg) In the early twentieth century, groups of Estonian (Estonian people) Estonian history and then Finnish (Finnish people) settlers moved to homesteads to the south and west of the fledgling settlement at Sylvan Lake. With their arrival came the early business community, a general store, a blacksmith, a hardware store, post office, barber, and restaurants. The completion of the Canadian Northern (Canadian Northern Railway) line to Rocky Mountain House and Nordegg (Nordegg, Alberta) in 1912 and the parallel Canadian Pacific (Canadian Pacific Railway) in 1914 opened the west country to settlement and resulted in the incorporation of Sylvan Lake in 1913 under Mayor E. S. Grimson, a local hardware store owner. The anniversary of the founding of the town is celebrated every year in Sylvan Lake as "1913 Days". Farming quickly became a mainstay in the area and in 1923 an Alberta Pacific grain elevator was built on the CPR line immediately north of what is now Cottonwood Estates. The elevator was torn down in the 1970s and the CPR line was abandoned in 1980 and removed. Since then, the right of way has survived as a natural area and walking path through Sylvan Lake. Elevators were also constructed along the CN line and were used by local farmers in the mid-century decades. They were torn down in the late 1990s. Even prior to the building of the railways, Sylvan Lake was becoming a summer resort for families in Red Deer (Red Deer, Alberta). With the coming of the trains, "the Lake" became a favourite of families from both Edmonton and Calgary. The summer visitors camped in tents, but soon the "Cottage Area" east of 46 Street and in "Lower Camp" on the southeast shore began to fill with summer cottages. In the 1930s and 1940s people began arriving by car and the areas around Norglenwold (Norglenwold, Alberta), Sylvan Lake Provincial Park and Jarvis Bay Provincial Park began to fill up with summer visitors. The influx of summer residents and visitors also brought businesses and services that catered to the ever increasing number of tourists. In 1913, the first motor launch took paying passengers on tours around the lake. A large boathouse was constructed in 1926, allowing visitors to rent a boat, canoe, swimsuit, or buy ice cream, pop and other items necessary to a summer day at the lake. Regattas were held on the lake for a number of years beginning in 1923. In 1928, the Dominion Government, assisted by the Sylvan Lake Women's Institute (WI), built the long pier that jutted out into the lake from the bottom of Main Street. This pier was connected to the earlier WI Pier and formed a square area used for swimming and mooring boats. The first "waterslide" at Sylvan Lake was part of this facility. The piers were prone to ice damage over the winter and were replaced by the existing "landfill" that now hosts beach volleyball tournaments, dragon boat racingand the lake tour on the "Zoo Cruise". In 1983, the original waterslide was replaced by the Wild Rapids Waterslide, which is the largest facility of its kind in western Canada. Another byproduct of losing the piers and later the government boat launch was the construction of the Sylvan Lake Marina, home of many of the permanent boats on the lake, boating facilities, and the Sylvan Lake lighthouse. In 2014, Sylvan Lake won the Kraft Hockeyville contest, which included a large cash prize and the rights to host an NHL pre-season game between the Calgary Flames and the Arizona Coyotes. Geography Climate rural_municipalities Red Deer County, Alberta Red Deer County , Lacombe County (Lacombe County, Alberta), Ponoka County (Ponoka County, Alberta), Wetaskiwin No. 10 County (Wetaskiwin County No. 10, Alberta), Brazeau County (Brazeau County, Alberta) towns Sylvan Lake (Sylvan Lake, Alberta), Rimbey (Rimbey, Alberta) villages Breton (Breton, Alberta) From Highway 12 (Alberta Highway 12), it goes directly south for 16 km where it meets Highway 11A (Alberta Highway 11A) at a four way stop at the east end of Sylvan Lake (Sylvan Lake, Alberta). From Highway 11A (Alberta Highway 11A) it travels another 4 km to its end at Highway 11 (Alberta Highway 11).


Rawalpindi

,title -- DATE OF DEATH January 21, 2004 PLACE OF DEATH Rawalpindi, Punjab province (Punjab (Pakistan)) WikiPedia:Rawalpindi Dmoz:Regional Asia Pakistan Provinces Punjab Localities Rawalpindi commons:Rawalpindi


Portland, Maine

Portland, Maine), United States death_date death_place Portland, Maine, United States occupation Writer, Critic, Lawyer, Architect Boyhood, young adulthood, and early business Born in a yellow frame house on Free Street at the corner of South Street in Falmouth (now Portland, Maine) of Quaker parents, he attended school until the age of twelve


Wellington

", in ''Daily Southern Cross'', Volume XVI, Issue 1240, 29 July 1859, Page 5. He was appointed to the Legislative Council (Legislative Council of New Zealand) on 9 July 1872, and remained a member until his death in 1894. Wikipedia:Wellington Dmoz:Regional Oceania New Zealand Wellington Wellington City Commons:Wellington


Toronto

and the Royal Military College of Canada in Kingston, Ontario. Early business career Upon graduation, he joined the family accounting firm of Clarkson, Gordon and Company, in January 1927. ''A Political Memoir'', by Walter Gordon, Toronto 1977, McClelland & Stewart publishers, p. 13. He was a student there for four years, became a chartered accountant in early 1931, and was promoted to partner in 1935. ''A Political Memoir'', by Walter Gordon

, Toronto 1977, McClelland & Stewart publishers, p. 16. Early business career Upon graduation, he joined the family accounting firm of Clarkson, Gordon and Company, in January 1927. ''A Political Memoir'', by Walter Gordon, Toronto 1977, McClelland & Stewart publishers, p. 13. He was a student there for four years, became a chartered accountant in early 1931, and was promoted to partner in 1935. ''A Political Memoir


Boston

Early life, education, and early business career Kennedy was born in Brighton (Brighton, Massachusetts), a neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts, to Robert Francis Kennedy and Ethel Kennedy, the second of their eleven children. He had a troubled youth, and was expelled from several private schools as a result of his quick temper. He regularly got into fights with his younger brothers and male cousins.

drinking water and the ability to repay a 300 taka-a-week (around 4 USD) loan. commons:Boston


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