Places Known For

cultural life


Kaposvár

but was a clean, pleasant, civic town with restaurants, cafés and active cultural life. Thanks to József Adorján, Ferenc Csik and a number of olympic sportmen the world got to know the city's sportlife. The national policy darkened more and more, the "happy peacetimes", the left-wing ideas and later the wind of the World War II reached the city. Almost one thousand citizens died or disappeared during the fights. In 1944 the city was twice under foreign occupation. In March the German soldiers filed in Kaposvár. The Jews were deported, most of them died in Auschwitz. The frontline arrived here on 2 December when soviet troops replaced the Germans. The life could start fast in the city because fortunately, the fights didn't cause remarkable destruction. Kaposvár always said to be an "insurrectionist" city and it chose again the policy of restart. The parties formed, like the Communist Party, but the Country Party had the biggest side. After the communist received the power the socialisations finished and the new kind of industrial expansion started, the socialist industrialisation. Its result was for example the textil factory, meat plant, electricity factory. But the small industries disappeared. In 1956 Kaposvár joined the revolution but on 4 November the soviet tanks clunked through the city's streets: the fall of the revolution and the sanctions had a lot of victim in Kaposvár. Between them the famous born of Kaposvár, the revolution's martyr prime minister, Imre Nagy. The chief city of the county woke up hardly after the flop. In the next decade the development of the industry and the flat construction started. From 1970 new subtopias built. The city's administrative boarder flared: in 1950 Kaposszentjakab (Zselicszentjakab), in 1970 Kaposfüred and Toponár and in 1973 Töröcske joined the city. In 1971 the training-school and the agricultural technical institute became college. In the field of science and culture many person made famous the name of the city, not just in the country but beyond the borders too: the Archives of Somogy County, the Csiky Gergely Theatre, the Béla Vikár Choir, the Somogy Dance Group, and the Berzsenyi Company. The crisis of the 1980s, and the stop of the city's development made necessary changes. In the end of the decade - like so many times during its history - Kaposvár stood to the top of reforms. The maverick organisations were funded and a memorial tablet was put on Imre Nagy's house, as the symbol of new times. In 1990 Kaposvár became urban county and in 1993 an episcopal seat. 21st century Today Kaposvár - with its university, education system, and thousands of students - is a real school city. With the well-kept plazas, streets, colourful flowerbeds it is the city of flowers. With its rippling wells it is the city of waterworks. With its lively cultural life, rich art programmes it is the city of festivals and the city of painters. With its wonderfully reborn downtown with the feeling of peaceful, Mediterranean atmosphere, the chief town of the county has become a real European city. ) (born 23 October 1837 in Kaposvár, Hungary - 6 March 1902 in Vienna, Austria) was a Hungarian physician and dermatologist who discovered the skin tumor (Kaposi's sarcoma) that received his name (Kaposi's sarcoma). style "text-align:center;" czech republic Brno Silver Image:Med 2.png style "text-align:center;" hungary Kaposvár Gold Image:Med 1.png - *Léva (Levice) 14.3% Q, Nagyszombat (Trnava SL) 14.0%, *Kaposvár 13.9% N, Gyulafehérvár (Alba Iulia RO) 13.7%, Kisszeben (Sabinov SL) 13.3%, Poprád (Poprad SL) 13.0%, *Nagykanizsa 12.7% N, Győr 12.6% Nx, Gyöngyös 12.6% Qx, Zalaegerszeg 12.4% N, Szepesváralja (Spišské Podhradie SL) 12.4%, DATE OF BIRTH 23 August 1929 PLACE OF BIRTH Kaposvár, Hungary DATE OF DEATH 1 September 1997


Scottish Arts Council

, Scottish Ballet, Royal Scottish National Orchestra, Scottish Chamber Orchestra) and that the Arts Council was to be replaced by a new body. Under the direction of Jackie Wylie, The Arches has recently staged performances such as DEREVO's ''Natura Morte'', Nic Green's ''Trilogy'' and Linder Sterling's ''Darktown Cakewalk''. Their initial recordings were supported by funding from the Scottish Arts Council, and were produced by Michael Brennan, who previously worked with Super Furry Animals and Mogwai. When at Polygon, he tried to publish James Kelman's second novel, and requested a grant from the Scottish Arts Council. They refused, mainly on the basis of a complaint from Alick Buchanan-Smith, a Conservative MP, who complained about the "foul language" in Kelman's first novel. Works As well as several collections of poetry, his books include a memoir, ''Distances'' (2001), from Scottish Cultural Press. Most recently he edited ''100 Favourite Scottish Poems'' (SPL Luath Press, 2006), a TLS Christmas choice, and ''100 Favourite Scottish Love Poems'' (Luath Press, 2008). He has won three Scottish Arts Council book awards, travel awards from the Society of Authors and the English-Speaking Union, and the Institute of Contemporary Scotland's first Iain Crichton Smith award for services to literature. His collection ''An Ear to the Ground'' was a Poetry Book Society Choice, and ''Stolen Light'' was shortlisted for Saltire Scottish book of the year.


Northeast, Minneapolis

that the grain mills and sawmills along the river offered, and later by rail and factory jobs across the city. By 1930, immigrants made up nearly 60% of Northeast's total population. The Eastern European immigrants, particularly the Poles with whom Northeast is most often associated, had a profound influence on the cultural life of Minneapolis. The Polish (Polish people) presence in "Nordeast" remains strong, including the names of local businesses that still bear the mark of the area's


Cegléd

High School, László Ungvári High School of Commerce and Tourism, Lajos Kossuth Secondary Grammar School, János Török Vocational High School of Health Care (Health care) and Agriculture, and Cegléd High School of Informatics and Economics As well as the Ferenc Erkel conservatory (College or university school of music). Cultural life and local media Cegléd has a community cultural centre called Cultural Palace or Kossuth Community Centre (Community centre), originally


Jauja

Peru Festivals The cultural life in the city is vibrant, with many festivals and social and religious events taking place throughout the year. The most popular festival is the Feast of San Sebastian and San Fabian (20


Spanish National Research Council

Nations University International Institute for Software Technology ), and Tadashi Tokieda (Cambridge (University of Cambridge)). They each teach three-week-long modules. Today, the Residencia is again a unique center in Spain’s cultural life. The Spanish State trough an independent


Porto-Novo

''' - - Benin Porto-Novo (official), Cotonou (administrative) Cotonou - In addition to being Benin's largest city, it houses many of its government and diplomatic services; thus, it is Benin's ''de facto'' capital (Capital (political)), even though the official (de jure) capital is Porto-Novo. The city is a major port, and is also home to an airport (Cadjehoun Airport) and a railway that links to Parakou. Other features of Cotonou include Cotonou Friendship Stadium


Struga

. -- Struga is also a place of important cultural significance in the Republic of Macedonia, as it is the birthplace of the poets Konstantin and Dimitar Miladinov (Miladinov Brothers). The main event of the cultural life in Struga is the world's largest poetry gathering, Struga Poetry Evenings, whose laureates have included several Nobel Prize for Literature winners such as Joseph Brodsky, Eugenio Montale, Pablo Neruda, Seamus Heaney, Fazıl Hüsnü Dağlarca and many


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