Places Known For

century light


Colwood, British Columbia

a real 19th century light and capture some of the feeling of ships wrecked and lives saved. Built by the British in 1860, when Vancouver Island was not yet part of Canada, Fisgard's red brick house and white tower has stood faithfully at the entrance to Esquimalt Harbour. Once a beacon for the British Royal Navy's Pacific Squadron, today Fisgard still marks home base for the Maritime Forces Pacific of the Royal Canadian Navy. Colwood is also home to historic


Switzerland

archivedate 26 June 2009 deadurl yes thumb upright 1.2 left The Old Swiss Confederacy from 1291 (dark green) to the sixteenth century (light green) and its associates (blue). In the other colors are shown the subject territories. (File:Old Swiss Confederation.jpg) By 1353, the three original cantons (Cantons of Switzerland) had joined with the cantons of Glarus (Canton of Glarus) and Zug (Canton of Zug) and the Lucerne, Zürich and Bern city states to form the "Old Confederacy" of eight states that existed until the end of the 15th century. The expansion led to increased power and wealth for the federation. By 1460, the confederates controlled most of the territory south and west of the Rhine to the Alps and the Jura mountains, particularly after victories against the Habsburgs (Battle of Sempach, Battle of Näfels), over Charles the Bold of Burgundy (Duchy of Burgundy) during the 1470s, and the success of the Swiss mercenaries. The Swiss victory in the Swabian War against the Swabian League of Emperor (Holy Roman Emperor) Maximilian I (Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor) in 1499 amounted to ''de facto'' independence within the Holy Roman Empire. The Old Swiss Confederacy had acquired a reputation of invincibility during these earlier wars, but expansion of the federation (Growth of the Old Swiss Confederacy) suffered a setback in 1515 with the Swiss defeat in the Battle of Marignano. This ended the so-called "heroic" epoch of Swiss history. The success of Zwingli's Reformation (Reformation in Switzerland) in some cantons led to inter-cantonal religious conflicts in 1529 and 1531 (Wars of Kappel). It was not until more than one hundred years after these internal wars that, in 1648, under the Peace of Westphalia, European countries recognized Switzerland's independence from the Holy Roman Empire and its neutrality (neutral country). During the Early Modern (Early Modern Switzerland) period of Swiss history, the growing authoritarianism of the patriciate families combined with a financial crisis in the wake of the Thirty Years' War led to the Swiss peasant war of 1653. In the background to this struggle, the conflict between Catholic (Catholic Church) and Protestant (Protestantism) cantons persisted, erupting in further violence at the Battles of Villmergen in 1656 and 1712. Napoleonic era commons:Confoederatio Helvetica


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