Places Known For

centuries traditional


Rosebud Indian Reservation

. The county is named after John Blair Smith Todd (April 4, 1814 – January 5, 1872) who was a delegate from Dakota Territory to the United States House of Representatives ''Legislative Manual, South Dakota, 2005, p. 597 and a general in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He was a cousin of Mary Todd Lincoln. History This land was for centuries traditional territory of the Oglala Lakota, also known as the Sioux. First included in the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, most of the county was removed from the reservation in 1910 by an act of the US Congress and made available for sale to non-Natives. Any Pine Ridge Lakota who were displaced were given allotments within the diminished reservation, which extends to the northwest corner of the county. The boundaries of the future county were determined by the South Dakota state legislature in 1909. To the east is the Rosebud Indian Reservation, occupied by ''Sicangu Oyate (Brulé)'', also known the Upper Brulé Sioux Nation and the Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST), a branch of the Lakota people. '''Parmelee''' is a census-designated place (CDP) in Todd County (Todd County, South Dakota), South Dakota, United States, which lies within the Rosebud Indian Reservation. The population was 562 at the 2010 census (2010 United States Census). '''St. Francis''' is a town on the Rosebud Indian Reservation in Todd County (Todd County, South Dakota), South Dakota, United States. The population was 709 at the 2010 census (2010 United States Census). Company K of the Seventh Cavalry — the unit involved in the massacre — was sent to force the Lakotas' return to the areas they were assigned on their respective reservations. Some of the 'hostiles' were Brulé Lakota from the Rosebud Indian Reservation. The Seventh Cavalry was pinned down in a valley by the combined Lakota forces and had to be rescued by the Ninth Cavalry (9th Cavalry Regiment (United States)), an African American regiment nicknamed the Buffalo Soldiers. Jeffrey Ostler: The Plains Sioux and U.S. colonialism from Lewis and Clark to Wounded Knee pgs. 357-358, Cambridge University Press (2004) ISBN 0-521-60590-3 She was arrested on August 30, 2011 in front of The White House as part of a sit-in to protest the proposed Keystone oil pipeline (Keystone Pipeline) from Canada to the U.S. Gulf Coast. "Daryl Hannah Arrested". ''Edmonton Journal''. In October 2011, Hannah and other pipeline opponents rode horses and bicycles and walked from the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation to the Rosebud Reservation (Rosebud Indian Reservation) to protest the project. '''Iron Shell''' (1816–1896) was a Brulé Sioux chief. He initially became prominent after an 1843 raid on the Pawnee (Pawnee people), and became sub-chief of the Brulé under Little Thunder. Bettelyoun, Susan Bordeaux, and Waggoner, Josephine (1998). ''With My Own Eyes: A Lakota Woman Tells Her People's History'', p. 154. University of Nebraska Press. ISBN 0803261640. He became chief of the Brulé Orphan Band during the Powder River War of 1866-1868. He signed the Treaty of 1868, and lived the remainder of his life on the Rosebud Indian Reservation. Hollow Horn Bear was his son. * After the Ghost Dance (w:Ghost Dance) spread across the Rockies to the Plains tribes it ran amok. ...The fervor attacked the Plains tribes virulently, particularly the Sioux, who were at that time the largest and the most intransigent or them all. The Sioux had been forced to submit to a series of land grabs and to indignities that are almost unbelievable when read about today. ...they were being systematically starved into submission—by the White Bureaucracy—on the little that was left of their reservation in South Dakota. ...From Rosebud (w:Rosebud Indian Reservation), the Ghost Dance spread like prairie fire to the Pine Ridge (w:Pine Ridge Indian Reservation) Sioux and finally to Sitting Bull's people at Standing Rock (w:Standing Rock Indian Reservation). The Sioux rebelled; the result was the death of Sitting Bull (w:Sitting Bull#Death and burial) and the massacre of the Indians (despite their ghost shirts) at Wounded Knee (w:Wounded Knee Massacre) in 1890. ** Peter Farb, ''Man's Rise to Civilization'' (1968) * The Sioux had been forced to submit to a series of land grabs and to indignities that are almost unbelievable when read about today. ...they were being systematically starved into submission—by the White Bureaucracy—on the little that was left of their reservation in South Dakota. ...From Rosebud (w:Rosebud Indian Reservation), the Ghost Dance spread like prairie fire to the Pine Ridge (w:Pine Ridge Indian Reservation) Sioux and finally to Sitting Bull's people at Standing Rock (w:Standing Rock Indian Reservation). The Sioux rebelled; the result was the death of Sitting Bull (w:Sitting Bull#Death and burial) and the massacre of the Indians (despite their ghost shirts (w:Ghost shirt)) at Wounded Knee (w:Wounded Knee Massacre) in 1890. Since the Delegation's press conference, the Rosebud Sioux Tribe (w:Rosebud Indian Reservation) and the Cheyenne River Reservation (w: Cheyenne River Indian Reservation) have rejected Means's and the delegation's declaration of secession.


Pine Ridge Indian Reservation

1871 sqmi 1 , of which The '''Wounded Knee incident''' began February 27, 1973 when about 200 Oglala Lakota and followers of the American Indian Movement (AIM) seized and occupied the town of Wounded Knee, South Dakota on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. The grassroots protest followed the failure of their effort to impeach the elected tribal president Richard Wilson (Dick Wilson (tribal chairman)), whom they accused of corruption and abuse of opponents; they also protested the United States government's failure to fulfill treaties with Indian peoples and demanded the reopening of treaty negotiations. Occupation On February 27, AIM leaders Russell Means (Oglala Sioux) and Carter Camp (Ponca), together with 200 activists and Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux) of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation who opposed Oglala tribal chairman Richard Wilson (Dick Wilson (tribal chairman)), occupied the town of Wounded Knee in protest against Wilson's administration, as well as against the federal government's persistent failures to honor its treaties with Native American nations. The U.S. government law enforcement, including FBI agents, surrounded Wounded Knee the same day with armed reinforcements. They gradually gained more arms. "Wounded Knee Incident." United States Marshals Service. Retrieved May 10, 2007. The video is focused on the case for Leonard Peltier, who was one of the leaders of the American Indian Movement (AIM). The band is performing live in a small venue throughout the video. During the video, footage from the Peltier case is examined and detailed with shots of Peltier and other members of AIM. There is also a reenactment of what took place on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. The footage of this reenactment is from Michael Apted's 1992 documentary ''Incident at Oglala''. * After the Ghost Dance (w:Ghost Dance) spread across the Rockies to the Plains tribes it ran amok. ...The fervor attacked the Plains tribes virulently, particularly the Sioux, who were at that time the largest and the most intransigent or them all. The Sioux had been forced to submit to a series of land grabs and to indignities that are almost unbelievable when read about today. ...they were being systematically starved into submission—by the White Bureaucracy—on the little that was left of their reservation in South Dakota. ...From Rosebud (w:Rosebud Indian Reservation), the Ghost Dance spread like prairie fire to the Pine Ridge (w:Pine Ridge Indian Reservation) Sioux and finally to Sitting Bull's people at Standing Rock (w:Standing Rock Indian Reservation). The Sioux rebelled; the result was the death of Sitting Bull (w:Sitting Bull#Death and burial) and the massacre of the Indians (despite their ghost shirts) at Wounded Knee (w:Wounded Knee Massacre) in 1890. ** Peter Farb, ''Man's Rise to Civilization'' (1968) * The Sioux had been forced to submit to a series of land grabs and to indignities that are almost unbelievable when read about today. ...they were being systematically starved into submission—by the White Bureaucracy—on the little that was left of their reservation in South Dakota. ...From Rosebud (w:Rosebud Indian Reservation), the Ghost Dance spread like prairie fire to the Pine Ridge (w:Pine Ridge Indian Reservation) Sioux and finally to Sitting Bull's people at Standing Rock (w:Standing Rock Indian Reservation). The Sioux rebelled; the result was the death of Sitting Bull (w:Sitting Bull#Death and burial) and the massacre of the Indians (despite their ghost shirts (w:Ghost shirt)) at Wounded Knee (w:Wounded Knee Massacre) in 1890. Despite those rejections, Archer said that the Pine Ridge Reservation (w:Pine Ridge Indian Reservation)'s council may "consider the proposal." A representative for the Standing Rock Reservation (w:Standing Rock Indian Reservation)'s council has said that that reservation is also considering Lakotah Oyate's proposal. Lakotah Oyate have also been holding discussions with "about 150" other indigenous organizations in the U.S. and mentioned particularly the Native Hawaiians (w:Native Hawaiians).


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