Zimbabwe

What is Zimbabwe known for?


big hitting

for eight more One day games but again he disappointed and was dropped. He was out of the South African side for nearly three years until he was selected to play in the home series against England. In this series Kemp impressed with his big hitting with him smashing 80 runs from 50 balls in an innings that included 7 sixes. Following his performances he was picked for the series against Zimbabwe and in the match at Durban he hit 53 from 21 balls in an innings that included 5 sixes. He


controversial member

London after the Gulf War. A more controversial member of the Order was Robert Mugabe, whose honour was stripped by the Queen, on the advice of the Foreign Secretary (Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs), David Miliband, on 25 June 2008 as "as a mark of revulsion at the abuse of human rights and abject disregard for the democratic process in Zimbabwe over which President Mugabe has presided." WikiPedia:Zimbabwe Dmoz:Regional Africa Zimbabwe Commons:category:Zimbabwe


video work/

an occasionally tough rockumentary newsmagazine geared at 15 to 30 year-olds. Items and documentaries included those on Band-Aid, post-revolutionary music in Zimbabwe, the Japanese pop industry, Andy Warhol’s art video work, William Burroughs, Frank Zappa at the PMRC hearings in Washington (Washington, D.C.), the death and legacy of Bob Marley, Yoko Ono post-John (John Lennon), and Malcolm McLaren’s manufacture and manipulation of the Sex Pistols. *A bomb


style music

, Mozambican bands had abandoned their previous attempts at European-style music, and began forging new forms based out of local folk styles and the new African popular music coming from Zaire, Zimbabwe, Tanzania, Zambia and South Africa. Official US complaint with the WTO The ban over agricultural biotechnology is said by some Americans to breach WTO (World Trade Organization) rules. Robert B. Zoellick, the United States trade representative, indicated the European position


art video

an occasionally tough rockumentary newsmagazine geared at 15 to 30 year-olds. Items and documentaries included those on Band-Aid, post-revolutionary music in Zimbabwe, the Japanese pop industry, Andy Warhol’s art video work, William Burroughs, Frank Zappa at the PMRC hearings in Washington (Washington, D.C.), the death and legacy of Bob Marley, Yoko Ono post-John (John Lennon), and Malcolm McLaren’s manufacture and manipulation of the Sex Pistols. *A bomb


record size

gator that Jones was trying to grow to world record size. He was also an aficionado of poisonous spiders and reptiles, a large collection of which was also housed in the Nautilus building. The '''Nile crocodile''' or '''Common crocodile''' (''Crocodylus niloticus'') is an African crocodile which is common in Somalia, Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya, Egypt, Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Gabon, South Africa, Malawi, Sudan, Botswana, and Cameroon. Isolated populations also exist in Madagascar and in Senegal. There are an estimated 250,000 to 500,000 individuals in the wild. The Nile crocodile is also widely distributed, with strong, documented populations in many countries in east and southern Africa, including Somalia, Ethiopia, Kenya, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Successful sustainable-yield programs focused on ranching crocodiles for their skins have been successfully implemented in this area, and even countries with quotas are moving toward ranching. In 1993, 80,000 Nile crocodile skins were produced, the majority from ranches in Zimbabwe and South Africa. There are an estimated 250,000 to 500,000 individuals in the wild. The Nile crocodile is also widely distributed, with strong, documented populations in many countries in east and southern Africa, including Somalia, Ethiopia, Kenya, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Successful sustainable-yield programs focused on ranching crocodiles for their skins have been successfully implemented in this area, and even countries with quotas are moving toward ranching. In 1993, 80,000 Nile crocodile skins were produced, the majority from ranches in Zimbabwe and South Africa. February events * February 1 – The Dete train crash killed 50 people in the Zimbabwean town of Dete in the Western part of the country about WikiPedia:Zimbabwe Dmoz:Regional Africa Zimbabwe Commons:category:Zimbabwe


presenting special

in Zambia and Zimbabwe, with some in Mozambique. He now concentrates on ''The World Tonight'' and ''Newshour'', although still presenting special programmes on major occasions. For the BBC World Service, he has presented every UK election night programme since 1997, United States presidential election programmes in 2004 and 2008, and has reported on elections in many other countries including Iran, Israel, Japan, Russia and Zimbabwe. He has presented ''The World Tonight'' from more than 20 countries, including Afghanistan, China, Iran, Iraq, Japan, Kosovo and Mexico. Description ''Megapnosaurus'' measured up to 3 meters (10 ft) long from nose to tail and weighed about 32 kilograms (70 lb (pound (mass))). The bones of 30 ''Megapnosaurus'' individuals were found together in a fossil bed in Zimbabwe, so paleontologists think it may have hunted in packs. The various fossils attributed to ''Megapnosaurus'' have been dated over a relatively large time span - the Hettangian, Sinemurian, and Pliensbachian stages of the Early Jurassic - meaning the fossils represent either a highly successful genus or a few closely related animals all currently assigned to ''Megapnosaurus''. The '''Rhodesian Air Force''' (RhAF) was an air force based in Salisbury (Harare) (now Harare) which represented several entities under various names between 1935 and 1980: originally serving the British self-governing colony of Southern Rhodesia, it was the air arm of the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland between 1953 and 31 December 1963; of Southern Rhodesia once again from 1 January 1964; and of the unrecognised (list of states with limited recognition) nation of Rhodesia following its Unilateral Declaration of Independence from Britain on 11 November 1965. Named the '''Royal Rhodesian Air Force''' (RRAF) from 1954, the "Royal" prefix was dropped in 1970 when Rhodesia declared itself a republic – the official abbreviation changed appropriately. When the internationally-recognised country of Zimbabwe came into being in 1980, the RhAF became the Air Force of Zimbabwe. White South Africans differ significantly from other white African groups, due to not only their much larger population, but because they have developed nationhood, as in the case of the Afrikaners, who established a distinct language, culture and church in Africa. The history of the Afrikaner nation can be traced back to the first white settlement of Africa with the arrival of the Dutch under Jan van Riebeeck in 1652. Therefore, their presence in Africa long predates the arrival of other white groups on the continent. White South Africans are also considered to be the last major white population group on the African continent, since the number of white people in other African states has declined to negligible figures. The role of whites in the South African economy and political arena has remained, which differs from other African countries, such as Zimbabwe, where whites retreated from the political spectrum. Whites number approximately 4.5 to 5 million, or between 9% and 10% of South Africa's population. This represents a decline, both numerically and proportionately, since white rule ended. It is estimated that as many as 800,000 whites have emigrated from the country since the end of apartheid (South Africa under apartheid) in 1994. Cricket originated in its modern form in England, and is popular mainly in the countries of the Commonwealth (Commonwealth of Nations). In the countries of South Asia, including India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka, cricket is by far the most popular participatory and spectator sport, and it is also a major sport in places such as England and Wales, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Zimbabwe and the English (English language)-speaking Caribbean (called the West Indies (West Indian cricket team)); and is played in over 100 countries. '''(more... (Cricket))''''' Cricket originated in its modern form in England, and is popular mainly in the countries of the Commonwealth (Commonwealth of Nations). In the countries of South Asia, including India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka, cricket is by far the most popular participatory and spectator sport, and it is also a major sport in places such as England and Wales, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Zimbabwe and the English (English language)-speaking Caribbean (called the West Indies (West Indian cricket team)). Owing to the way that Africa was carved up by the European powers in the 19th century in their so-called "Scramble for Africa", Schuckmannsburg lies right near several other countries, Zambia just to the north, Botswana about 30 km to the south and Zimbabwe about 50 km to the east. Angola is also only about 80 km to the west. It is a thorn acacia native to the drier parts of Southern Africa. Its preferred habitat is deep sandy soils. It occurs in the Transvaal (Transvaal Province), western Free State (Free State (South African province)), northern Cape Province, Botswana, the western areas of Zimbabwe and Namibia. The tree was first described by Ernst Heinrich Friedrich Meyer & Johann Franz Drège in 1836. USDA Germplasm Resources Information Network entry for ''Acacia erioloba'' On 28 February 1993, Zambia, needing a win to qualify to the group stages in the World Cup Qualifying campaign, swept aside Madagascar 3-1 in Lusaka. The Zambians were then drawn in the same group as Morocco and Senegal and many felt the time had come for Zambia to qualify to the World Cup as they had a very good team which had been together for a while, with coaching staff who seemed to inspire the team. On 10 April 1993, Zambia played out a goalless draw at home to Zimbabwe in an African Nations Cup qualifier. Two weeks later, the Zambians crushed Mauritius 3-0 in Port Louis with Chabala as captain and Kelvin Mutale grabbing a hat-trick. right thumb Classrooms and Administration Block of Kutama College, 1995 (Image:Kutamafront.jpg) '''Kutama College''' (officially '''St Francis Xavier College'''), is an all-boys high school located near the town of Norton (Norton, Zimbabwe) in the Zvimba area, 80 kilometres southwest of the Zimbabwean capital Harare. Kutama has a student population of about 700 pupils, and is considered one of Africa's top 100 high schools (#61 in 2003). Africa's Top 100 High Schools WikiPedia:Zimbabwe Dmoz:Regional Africa Zimbabwe Commons:category:Zimbabwe


developing world

toward GMO was thought of as "immoral" since it could lead to starvation in the developing world (developing country) or wars, as seen in some famine-threatened African countries (e.g., Zambia, Zimbabwe, and Mozambique) that refuse to accept US aid because it contains GM food. 240px thumb right Ghana national football team Ghana (File:Sulley.jpg)'s Sulley Muntari about to take a free kick at the 2008 tournament (2008 African Cup of Nations) The 2000 African

leaders in the developing world" and questioned: "Why so did many Western media outlets, including Canadian ones, send their own correspondents to cover an election in a poor faraway African country of about 13-million black people? The answer is that Mugabe is hated by the British now as he was hated in 1980 when he was elected the first president of free Zimbabwe, after 90 years of British colonization under the name of Rhodesia." Elmasry praised Mugabe for "trying to implement a land reform; to redistribute the land of about 5,000 white farmers to his country's poor black people" and argued that the collapse of Zimbabwe's economy and the rampant inflation are the result of Western sanctions and not because of Mugabe's land seizures. Elmasy criticized the Western Media for not reporting that "Mugabe was and still is popular especially in the rural areas; his land reform has won him support among his own people." WikiPedia:Zimbabwe Dmoz:Regional Africa Zimbabwe Commons:category:Zimbabwe


place nearby

-east of Bulawayo. The Battle of Bembezi took place nearby in 1893. '''Eastnor''' is a village in Matabeleland North, Zimbabwe and is located about 25 km north of Bulawayo


traditional vocal

. arthuri'' is found in Kenya and northern Tanzania while ''F. r. fieldi'' occurs in Ethiopia, Eritrea, northern Somalia and probably northern Kenya. WikiPedia:Zimbabwe Dmoz:Regional Africa Zimbabwe Commons:category:Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe

'''Zimbabwe''' , officially the '''Republic of Zimbabwe''', is a landlocked country located in southern Africa, between the Zambezi and Limpopo (Limpopo River) rivers. It is bordered by South Africa to the south, Botswana to the southwest, Zambia to the northwest and Mozambique to the east. The capital and largest city is Harare.

What is now Zimbabwe was historically the site of many prominent kingdoms and empires, as well as a major route for migration and trade. The present territory was first demarcated by Cecil Rhodes' British South Africa Company during the 1890s, becoming the self-governing colony of Southern Rhodesia in 1923. In 1965 the conservative white (White people in Zimbabwe) minority government (Minority rule) unilaterally declared independence (Unilateral Declaration of Independence) as Rhodesia. The unrecognized state (List of historical unrecognized states) endured international isolation and a 15-year civil war (Rhodesian Bush War) between the government and black nationalist forces; this culminated in a peace agreement (Lancaster House Agreement) that established universal enfranchisement and ''de jure'' sovereignty in April 1980.

An ethnically diverse country of roughly 13 million people, Zimbabwe has 16 official languages, with English (English language), Shona (Shona language) and Ndebele (Northern Ndebele language) being most common. President (List of Presidents of Zimbabwe) Robert Mugabe is head of state and government, and commander-in-chief of the armed forces (Zimbabwe Defence Forces). Renowned as a champion for the anti-colonial cause, He has held power since 1980: as head of government until 1987, and head of both state and government since then.

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