Zhenjiang

What is Zhenjiang known for?


written work

;" 2010 High-speed rail People's Republic of China - In the 1070s, Shen had purchased a lavish garden estate on the outskirts of modern-day Zhenjiang, Jiangsu province, a place of great beauty which he named "Dream Brook" ("Mengxi") after he visited it for the first time in 1086. Shen Kuo permanently moved to the Dream Brook Estate in 1088, and in that same year he completed his life's written

work of the ''Dream Pool Essays'', naming the book after his garden-estate property. It was there that Shen Kuo spent the last several years of his life in leisure, isolation, and illness, until his death in 1095. thumb right 125px Hudson Taylor in 1893 (File:HudsonTaylorin1893.jpg) Due to health issues, Taylor remained in Switzerland, semi-retired with his wife. In 1900, Dixon Edward Hoste was appointed the Acting General Director of the CIM, and in 1902, Taylor formally resigned. His wife, Jennie, died of cancer in 1904 in Les Chevalleyres, Switzerland, and in 1905, Taylor returned to China for the eleventh and final time. There he visited Yangzhou and Zhenjiang and other cities, before dying suddenly while reading at home in Changsha. He was buried next to his first wife, Maria in Zhenjiang near the Yangtze River. *Sailed to China from San Francisco, 23 March 1905. Arrived 17 April 1905 in Shanghai, China *'''Died 3 June 1905 in Changsha, Hunan, China. Buried 9 June 1905 in Protestant Cemetery (no longer existing) in Zhenjiang, Jiangsu, China subdivision_type1 Major Cities subdivision_name1 Shanghai Nanjing Hangzhou Suzhou Ningbo Wuxi Nantong Shaoxing Changzhou Jinhua Jiaxing Taizhou (Taizhou, Zhejiang) Yangzhou Yancheng Taizhou (Taizhou, Jiangsu) Zhenjiang Huzhou Huai'an Zhoushan Quzhou Ma'anshan Hefei area_metro_km2 In 1982, the Chinese government set up the Shanghai Economic Area. Besides Shanghai, 4 cities in Jiangsu (Suzhou, Wuxi, Changzhou, Nantong) and 5 citeis in Zhejiang (Hangzhou, Jiaxing, Shaoxing, Huzhou, Ningbo) were included. In 1992, a 14-city cooperative joint meeting was launched. Besides the previous 10 cities, the members included Nanjing, Zhenjiang and Yangzhou in Jiangsu, and Zhoushan in Zhejiang. In 1997, the regular joint meeting resulted in the establishment of the Yangtze River Delta Economic Coordination Association, which included a new member Taizhou (Taizhou, Jiangsu) in Jiangsu in that year. In 2003, Taizhou (Taizhou, Zhejiang) in Zhejiang also joined the association. In 2010, the association accepted 6 new members after six-year observation and review, including Yancheng and Huai'an in Jiangsu, Jinhua and Quzhou in Zhejiang, and Ma'anshan and Hefei in Anhui. The total number of cities in the Yangtze River Delta Economic Coordination Association is now 22. Some other cities that have been in consideration and in review include Wenzhou and Lishui in Zhejiang, Lianyungang and Xuzhou in Jiangsu, and Chuzhou, Wuhu, Tongling, Huainan and Xuancheng in Anhui. *Urban cores: '''Shanghai''' (a municipality of China), '''Nanjing''' (the capital of Jiangsu Province), '''Hangzhou''' (the capital of Zhejiang Province), Suzhou, Ningbo, Wuxi. *Jiangsu Province: Nanjing, Suzhou (including county-level urban centres of Changshu, Taicang, Kunshan, Wujiang (Wujiang, Jiangsu) and Zhangjiagang), Wuxi (including county-level urban centres of Jiangyin and Yixing), Nantong (including county-level urban centres of Rugao, Haimen, and Qidong (Qidong, Jiangsu)), Changzhou (including county-level urban centres of Jintan and Liyang), Yangzhou (including urban centre of Yizheng), Yancheng (including county-level urban centres of Dafeng and Dongtai), Taizhou (Taizhou, Jiangsu) (including county-level urban centres of Jiangyan, Jingjiang, Taixing and Xinghua (Xinghua, Jiangsu)), Zhenjiang (including county-level urban centres of Danyang, Jurong (Jurong, Jiangsu) and Yangzhong), Huai'an. *Zhejiang Province: Hangzhou (including county-level urban centres of Lin'an, Fuyang (Fuyang, Zhejiang) and Jiande), Ningbo (including county-level urban centre of Cixi (Cixi City), Fenghua and Yuyao), Shaoxing (including county-level urban centres of Shangyu, Shengzhou and Zhuji), Jinhua (including urban centres of Dongyang, Lanxi (Lanxi, Zhejiang), Yongkang (Yongkang, Zhejiang) and Yiwu), Jiaxing (including county-level urban centres of Haining (Haining, Zhejiang), Pinghu and Tongxiang), Taizhou (Taizhou, Zhejiang) (including urban centre of Linhai), Huzhou, Zhoushan, Quzhou (including urban centre of Jiangshan). 200px (File:ChangZhou.jpg) a prefecture-level city in southern Jiangsu province. Located on the southern bank of the Yangtze River, Changzhou borders the provincial capital Nanjing to the west, Zhenjiang to the northwest, Wuxi to the east, and the province of Zhejiang to the south. - 200px (Image:Yangzhou.jpg) a prefecture-level city in central Jiangsu province. Sitting on the northern bank of the Yangtze River, Yangzhou borders the provincial capital Nanjing to the southwest, Huai'an to the north, Yancheng to the northeast, Taizhou (Taizhou, Jiangsu) to the east, and Zhenjiang across the Yangtze River to the south. Historically it is one of the wealthiest of China's cities, known at various periods for its great merchant families, poets, painters, and scholars. - - Zhenjiang (Jiangsu) 镇江 鎮江 200px (File:Zhenjiang Dantu.jpg) a prefecture-level city in the southwest of Jiangsu province. Sitting on the southern bank of the Yangtze River, Zhenjiang borders the provincial capital Nanjing to the west, Changzhou to the east, and Yangzhou across the Yangtze River to the north. Today Zhenjiang is an important transportation hub owing to its location near the intersection of the Yangtze River and the Grand Canal (Grand Canal (China)). - 200px (File:Zhenjiang Dantu.jpg) a prefecture-level city in the southwest of Jiangsu province. Sitting on the southern bank of the Yangtze River, Zhenjiang borders the provincial capital Nanjing to the west, Changzhou to the east, and Yangzhou across the Yangtze River to the north. Today Zhenjiang is an important transportation hub owing to its location near the intersection of the Yangtze River and the Grand Canal (Grand Canal (China)). - The dish originated in the region of Yangzhou and Zhenjiang in Jiangsu province, with the plain variety more common in Yangzhou and the red variety more common in Zhenjiang. The dish became a part of Shanghai cuisine with the influx of migrants in the 19th and early 20th century. The dish originated in the region of Yangzhou and Zhenjiang in Jiangsu province, with the plain variety more common in Yangzhou and the red variety more common in Zhenjiang. The dish became a part of Shanghai cuisine with the influx of migrants in the 19th and early 20th century. In 252, just before Sun Quan's death, he was created the Prince of Langye, with his fief at Hulin (虎林, in modern Chizhou, Anhui). Later that year, after his younger brother Sun Liang became emperor under the regency of Zhuge Ke, Zhuge did not want the princes to be based near the important military bases along the Yangtze River, so he moved Sun Xiu to Danyang (丹陽, in modern Xuancheng, Anhui, not the modern locale in Zhenjiang, Jiangsu). Unlike his brother Sun Fen (孫奮) the Prince of Qi, who initially resisted, Sun Xiu did not put up any resistance to the move. Once he was at Danyang, however, the governor of Danyang Commandery, Li Heng (李衡), found many excuses to bully the young prince. Sun Xiu could not endure it, and so he petitioned his brother for another move; his brother had him moved to Kuaiji (會稽, in modern Shaoxing, Zhejiang). In spring 589, the Sui general Heruo Bi (賀若弼) crossed the Yangtze at Jingkou (京口, in modern Zhenjiang, Jiangsu), and the Sui general Han Qinhu (韓擒虎) crossed the Yangtze at Caishi (采石, in modern Ma'anshan, Anhui). Meanwhile, Yang Su was advancing from the west down the Yangtze, and Yang Jun was stationed in the middle Yangtze region, cutting off any Chen forces that might have been able to come to the aid of Chen's capital Jiankang. Heruo soon defeated and captured the Chen general Xiao Mohe, who was making a final attempt to repel Heruo and Han's forces from Jiankang, and Jiankang fell immediately after. Chen Shubao was captured but not harmed. Rather, he and his clan members were transported to Chang'an, where Emperor Wen treated them as honored guests. Some Chen generals briefly resisted, but soon the Sui had control. The Southern and Northern Dynasties period was over, and Sui had united China. Much as how he had torn down Yecheng after Yuchi defeat, Emperor Wen tore down Jiankang, establishing only a minor garrison at the nearby Shitou as Jiang Province (蔣州). birth_date


service career

it to the poor. He was cashiered (Cashiering) for these efforts, but shrewd investments had left him wealthy enough to follow his pioneering archaeological studies and to write fiction. Li Yuanhong was said to be careful and kind in his youth. He started his civil service career as a military office at Jing Prefecture (涇州, roughly modern Pingliang, Gansu), and later was promoted to be the census officer at the capital prefecture Yong Prefecture (雍州, roughly modern Xi'an, Shaanxi) during the second reign of Wu Zetian's son Emperor Zhongzong (Emperor Zhongzong of Tang). At that time, Emperor Zhongzong's sister Princess Taiping was one of the powerful women at court, and on one occasion, she was litigating with a Buddhist temple as to the ownership of a mill, Li Yuahong ruled for the temple. Li Yuanhong's superior, the secretary general of Yong Prefecture Dou Huaizhen, was shocked and tried to get Li to change his ruling; Li responded by writing, in large characters, under his ruling, "The Southern Mountains (i.e., the Qinling Mountains) may move before this ruling may be changed." Dou could not do anything about it. ''New Book of Tang'', vol. 126. Li later served as the magistrate of Haozhi County (好畤, in modern Xianyang, Shaanxi) and then the military advisor to the prefect of Run Prefecture (潤州, roughly modern Zhenjiang, Jiangsu), and was said to have good reputation wherever he served. thumb left A statue of Qian Liu by the shore of the West Lake (File:Qian Liu.JPG) in Hangzhou, near the Shrine to the Qian Kings where Qian Liu and his successors are commemorated. During the rebellion of the army officer Wang Ying (Wang Ying (Tang Dynasty)) in 876-877, ''Zizhi Tongjian'', vol. 252 (:zh:s:資治通鑑 卷252). ''Zizhi Tongjian'', vol. 253 (:zh:s:資治通鑑 卷253). Qian and Dong Chang, also from Lin'an, joined a local militia to defend against Wang's raids. After Wang's rebellion was defeated, Dong, for his contributions during the campaign, was made the defender of Shijing Base (石鏡, in modern Hangzhou, Zhejiang), and Qian became a commander under Dong. In 878, when the agrarian rebel Cao Shixiong (曹師雄) was pillaging both Zhenhai Circuit (鎮海, headquartered in modern Zhenjiang, Jiangsu), which Hang Prefecture (which Shijing and Lin'an belonged to) was a part of, and Zhedong Circuit (浙東, headquartered in modern Shaoxing, Zhejiang), the Hang Prefecture government tried to resist the pillages by recruiting 1,000 men from each of the counties in the prefecture. Dong and seven others became the militia commanders, and their troops became known as the "Eight Corps of Hang Prefecture." Subsequently, when soldiers under the major agrarian rebel Huang Chao pillaged Zhenhai, Qian repelled the pillaging Huang army. * Qi Ying (786-787) * Han Huang (786-787) Han Huang was not listed in the table of chancellors, perhaps because he was still then military governor (''Jiedushi'') of Zhenhai Circuit (鎮海, headquartered in modern Zhenjiang, Jiangsu) and therefore arguably only an honorary chancellor, but he was listed in the table of chancellors' family trees, in the ''New Book of Tang''. Compare ''New Book of Tang'', vol. 62, with ''New Book of Tang'', vol. 73. Liu Hun (787) For the next year, Chen advanced north through modern Jiangxi, fighting the various local warlords and generals loyal to Hou, with his main struggle against Li Qianshi (李遷仕). In spring 551, he captured and killed Li. Xiao Yi made him the governor of Jiang Province (江州, roughly modern Jiangxi). By fall 551, he had rendezvoused with Xiao Yi's main general, Wang Sengbian, at Xunyang (尋陽, in modern Jiujiang, Jiangxi). In 552, after they had sworn a solemn oath to Liang, they advanced east toward Jiankang, where Hou had killed Xiao Gang (who had succeeded Emperor Wu as Emperor Jianwen) and taken the throne himself as Emperor of Han. Chen was instrumental in the subsequent siege of Jiankang, and they defeated Hou together, causing Hou to flee. Subsequently, Hou was killed by his own men. For Chen's contributions, Xiao Yi created Chen the Marquess of Changcheng—Chen's home county. Wang put Chen in charge of the important city Jingkou (京口, in modern Zhenjiang, Jiangsu). For the next two years, Chen was several times involved in border battles against Northern Qi (Eastern Wei's successor state). At times, when Xiao Yi (who had by now taken the throne as Emperor Yuan but set up his capital at his headquarters of Jiangling (Jiangling County) rather than at Jiankang) summoned Wang on campaigns, Wang would put Chen in charge of Jiankang. thumb right 150px Cover of the Occasional Paper of the China Inland Mission in 1875. (Image:Occasional Paper 1875.jpg) *Maria Jane Dyer "Mother of the Mission" died 23 July 1870 in Zhenjiang, Jiangsu, China * 1871-1875 Jiangxi : Dagutang J. E. Cardwell and wife opened mission station. * 1877 Guangxi : Edward Fishe is the first Protestant Christian missionary there. He died the same year. * 1877 Yunnan : John McCarthy (John McCarthy (missionary)) traveled on foot from Zhenjiang to Hankou (Hankou District), via Sichuan, Guizhou and Yunnan to Bhamo in Myanmar; the trip lasted 7 months with preaching along the way. He was the first European to cross China by foot from east to west as well as the first Protestant Christian missionary to enter Yunnan Province. * 1877 Tibet : James Cameron walked from Chongqing to Batang, the first to bring the Gospel to the Tibetan people. He then went on to Dali and Bhamo, then via Guangdong back to Chongqing, a journey covering 17 out of the then 18 Chinese provinces. The regiment then moved with the main force up the Yangtze towards Shanghai and Nanking, with the 26th part of the force which stormed Zhenjiang on 21 July. They disembarked outside Nanking on 11 August, remaining there whilst the Treaty of Nanking was signed, and then withdrew, reaching Hong Kong on 30 October. Carter, pp. 196–198 The regiment was granted permission to carry the battle honour "China" on its colours, along with an image of a dragon, as a result of its services during this expedition. Carter, p. 198; Baker, p. 271 Around the new year 833, Emperor Wenzong suffered a stroke. As Zheng Zhu was a talented physician, Wang Shoucheng recommended Zheng to Emperor Wenzong, and after Zheng was able to treat Emperor Wenzong, Emperor Wenzong became close to Zheng, but it was said that from this point on, Emperor Wenzong's spirit was weakened and could not be as strong as before. Subsequently, another associate of Wang's, Li Zhongyan, also became a close associate of Emperor Wenzong's, despite Li Deyu's attempts to reject him based on his past crimes. In order to counteract Li Deyu, Zheng and Li Zhongyan advocated for Li Zongmin's return from Shannan West, to again serve as chancellor, with Li Deyu sent to Zhenhai Circuit (鎮海, headquartered in modern Zhenjiang, Jiangsu). It was said that around this time, Emperor Wenzong, exasperated at the factionalism that the Niu and Li Factions were engaging, commended, "It is easy to destroy the bandits (i.e., the warlords) north of the Yellow River, but difficult to destroy the factionalism among officials." Subsequently, with Li Deyu having been accused of being closely associated with Li Cou's wet nurse Du Zhongyang (杜仲陽), he was further demoted and exiled. When the chancellor Lu Sui tried to intercede for Li Deyu, he, too, was sent out of the capital to serve as the military governor of Zhenghai. ''Zizhi Tongjian'', vol. 245 (:zh:s:資治通鑑 卷245). After Liu's and Yang's destruction, another warlord, Li Qi (Li Qi (Tang Dynasty)) the military governor of Zhenhai Circuit (鎮海, headquartered in modern Zhenjiang, Jiangsu) became apprehensive, and, as a means of showing loyalty, requested to go to Chang'an to pay homage to Emperor Xianzong. He did not actually intend to do so, however, and after Emperor Xianzong not only approved, but issued an edict summoning him when he did not depart Zhenhai immediately, rebelled against the imperial government. Before imperial troops could attack him, however, he was captured by his own subordinates and delivered to Chang'an to be executed. Around that time, another warlord, Yu Di the military governor of Shannan East Circuit (山南東道, headquartered in modern Xiangfan, Hubei), fearing Emperor Xianzong, went to Chang'an and yielded control of the circuit to the imperial government, after Emperor Xianzong had ensured Yu's loyalty by marrying his daughter Princess Puning to Yu's son Yu Jiyou (于季友). Early life Liu Yilong was born at Jingkou (京口, in modern Zhenjiang, Jiangsu) in 407, to Liu Yu and his concubine Hu Dao'an (胡道安), as Liu Yu's third son; at that time, Liu Yu was already the paramount general for Jin (Jin Dynasty (265-420)), and so Liu Yilong was born into a household of power and wealth. For reasons lost to history, in 409, Liu Yu put Consort Hu to death. Liu Yilong's maternal grandmother Lady Su was involved in his upbringing, and he was particularly close to her as he grew up. In 410, while the Jin capital Jiankang was under attack by the warlord Lu Xun (盧循), Liu Yu had his assistant Liu Cui (劉粹) accompany the three-year-old Liu Yilong to serve as the defender of Jingkou. In 415, he was created the Duke of Pengcheng. In 417, while Liu Yu was attacking Later Qin, he had Liu Yilong, again assisted by his staff, remain at Pengcheng to serve as the governor of Xu Province (Xuzhou (ancient China)) (徐州, modern northern Jiangsu and Anhui), to guard his rear. In 418, after Liu Yu conquered Later Qin, Liu Yilong was made the governor of the important Jing Province (Jingzhou (ancient China)) (荊州, modern Hubei and Hunan), and commander of armed forces of the western empire. Those who served on his staff included Dao Yanzhi (到彥之), Zhang Shao (張邵), Wang Tanshou (王曇首), Wang Hua (王華), and Shen Linzi (沈林子), with Zhang actually in charge of headquarters due to Liu Yilong's young age. After Liu Yu seized the Jin throne in 420, establishing Liu Song (as Emperor Wu), he created a number of his sons princes, and Liu Yilong was created the Prince of Yidu at that time. Around this time, he became known as studious in the Confucian classics and histories, and was also a good calligrapher (calligraphy). A native of today's Zhenjiang, Liu's traced his ancestry to Shandong. He was orphaned in his youth and chose not to marry, either because of poverty or conviction (or both). Liu studied Buddhism with Sengyou and helped edit sutras at the Dinglin Monastery (定林寺) until his death during the Liang Dynasty. Scribes copied every word by hand, and according to Wilkinson (2000: 274), "The copyists (of whom there were 3,826) were not paid in cash but rewarded with official posts after they had transcribed a given number of words within a set time." Four copies for the emperor were placed in specially constructed libraries in the Forbidden City, Old Summer Palace, Shenyang, and Wenjin Chamber, Chengde. Three additional copies for the public were deposited in ''Siku quanshu'' libraries in Hangzhou, Zhenjiang, and Yangzhou. All seven libraries also received copies of the 1725 imperial encyclopedia ''Gujin tushu jicheng''. '''Danyang''' (Simplified Chinese: 丹阳市; Traditional Chinese: 丹陽市; pinyin: Dānyáng Shì) is a county-level city administered by Zhenjiang in Jiangsu Province, in the People's Republic of China. It is well-known for production of optical lenses. Initially, the only major official who dared to oppose Huan Xuan was Mao Qu (毛璩) the governor of Yi Province (益州, modern Sichuan and Chongqing). However, a conspiracy soon formed among the general Liu Yu (Emperor Wu of Liu Song), Liu Laozhi's nephew He Wuji, and Liu Yi (Liu Yi (Jin Dynasty)) the brother of Huan Xuan's official Liu Mai (劉邁). They were soon joined by a number of other conspirators, and in spring 404 they started the uprising against Huan from the cities of Jingkou (京口, in modern Zhenjiang, Jiangsu) and Guangling. Huan Xuan panicked, and as soon as his cousin Huan Qian (桓謙) the Prince of Xinye lost some relatively minor battles to Liu Yu, Huan fled west with Emperor An, yielding Jiankang to Liu Yu's coalition. Once Liu Yu was in the capital, he declared the reestablishment of Jin, even though the former Jin emperor was still in Huan's hands. Biography Mao was born in Zhenjiang, Jiangsu province. He entered Jiaotong University's Tangshan Engineering College (now Southwest Jiaotong University) and earned his bachelor's degree in civil engineering in 1916. He earned his Master's degree from Cornell University and earned the first Ph.D. ever granted by the Carnegie Institute of Technology (now Carnegie Mellon University) in 1919. His doctoral treatise entitled ''Secondary Stress on Frame Construction'' is treasured at the Hunt Library of Carnegie Mellon University. Early life Liu Yu was born in 363, to his father Liu Qiao (劉翹) and mother Zhao Anzong (趙安宗), while they were living at Jingkou (京口, in modern Zhenjiang, Jiangsu). His great grandfather Liu Hun (劉混) was originally from Pengcheng (彭城, in modern Xuzhou, Jiangsu), before moving to Jingkou. ''Song Shu'', chp. 1 (''The Chronicle of Emperor Wu, Part 1''). Liu Qiao was said to be a 20th generation descendant of Han Dynasty's Prince of Chu, Liu Jiao (劉交), a younger brother of Han's founder Emperor Gaozu of Han. Liu Qiao was a police officer, while Zhao Anzong was the daughter of a commandery governor. They had married in 360, and lived in fair poverty. Lady Zhao died immediately after giving birth to Liu Yu, and Liu Qiao, unable to take care of the child financially or otherwise, considered abandoning the child. Upon hearing this, Liu Yu's aunt, who had given birth to his cousin Liu Huaijing (劉懷敬) less than a year ago, went to Liu Qiao's house and took Liu Yu, weaning Liu Huaijing and giving her milk to Liu Yu instead. At some point, Liu Qiao remarried, and his new wife Xiao Wenshou (Empress Dowager Xiao Wenshou) bore him two sons, Liu Daolian (劉道憐) and Liu Daogui (劉道規). Liu Yu was said to be respectful to his stepmother and treated her as his own mother. '''Chi Mei Corporation''' (


books written

Foundation of the Taiwanese government in 1996. His series of books written on the art of translation are studied by students of translation, and often adopted as text books by the universities. Si Guo is remembered and beloved as one of China's best modern essayists. His most popular works include Kan Hua Ji 看花集 (1976), Lin Ju Bi Hua 林居筆話 (1979) and Xiang Gang Zhi Qiuo 香港之秋 (1980). Twin towns – Sister cities *


remarkable+place

). Nanshan is currently being renovated (early 2008) and will hopefully be greatly improved. All parks have legend history. Jinshan park, which famous for "mountain encompassed by temples (寺裹山)", is a remarkable place in ancient novel WHITE SNAKE (白蛇传), where is flooded by white snake (who is half woman and half snake with great super-natural power) for the revenge of a Buddhist who imprison her husband. Beigushan park, which nears Yangtze river, is well known for the real story


agricultural science


great beauty,

;" 2010 High-speed rail People's Republic of China - In the 1070s, Shen had purchased a lavish garden estate on the outskirts of modern-day Zhenjiang, Jiangsu province, a place of great beauty which he named "Dream Brook" ("Mengxi") after he visited it for the first time in 1086. Shen Kuo permanently moved to the Dream Brook Estate in 1088, and in that same year he completed his life's written


dumplings

is located in Zhaoyin mountain, due to diffuse mountain bamboo is also known as bamboo hill. Bamboo forest temple name folder temple, the law on Jackson was built. Because of the temple in the deep forest, from afar, and the bamboo does not see the temple, so the name. Do Buy Eat Zhenjiang is known for producing the best vinegar in China. Most major cities situated nearby provide Zhenjiang vinegar whenever dumplings are served. Steamed dumplings with the famous vinegar can


translation+award

includes over 20 collections of essays, and close to a dozen translations of books from English to Chinese. For his work as an essayist, he won the 1979 award for outstanding academic and literary publications from the Chungshan Cultural Foundation of Taiwan. His highly praised Chinese translation of David Copperfield was finished at the Chinese University of Hong Kong where he was a Visiting Fellow in the late 1970s, and was awarded the prestigious Translation Award by the Cultural Promotion Foundation of the Taiwanese government in 1996. His series of books written on the art of translation are studied by students of translation, and often adopted as text books by the universities. Si Guo is remembered and beloved as one of China's best modern essayists. His most popular works include Kan Hua Ji 看花集 (1976), Lin Ju Bi Hua 林居筆話 (1979) and Xiang Gang Zhi Qiuo 香港之秋 (1980). Twin towns – Sister cities *


showing loyalty

the chancellor Lu Sui tried to intercede for Li Deyu, he, too, was sent out of the capital to serve as the military governor of Zhenghai. ''Zizhi Tongjian'', vol. 245 (:zh:s:資治通鑑 卷245). After Liu's and Yang's destruction, another warlord, Li Qi (Li Qi (Tang Dynasty)) the military governor of Zhenhai Circuit (鎮海, headquartered in modern Zhenjiang, Jiangsu) became apprehensive, and, as a means of showing loyalty, requested to go to Chang'an to pay homage to Emperor Xianzong. He did not actually intend to do so, however, and after Emperor Xianzong not only approved, but issued an edict summoning him when he did not depart Zhenhai immediately, rebelled against the imperial government. Before imperial troops could attack him, however, he was captured by his own subordinates and delivered to Chang'an to be executed. Around that time, another warlord, Yu Di the military governor of Shannan East Circuit (山南東道, headquartered in modern Xiangfan, Hubei), fearing Emperor Xianzong, went to Chang'an and yielded control of the circuit to the imperial government, after Emperor Xianzong had ensured Yu's loyalty by marrying his daughter Princess Puning to Yu's son Yu Jiyou (于季友). Early life Liu Yilong was born at Jingkou (京口, in modern Zhenjiang, Jiangsu) in 407, to Liu Yu and his concubine Hu Dao'an (胡道安), as Liu Yu's third son; at that time, Liu Yu was already the paramount general for Jin (Jin Dynasty (265-420)), and so Liu Yilong was born into a household of power and wealth. For reasons lost to history, in 409, Liu Yu put Consort Hu to death. Liu Yilong's maternal grandmother Lady Su was involved in his upbringing, and he was particularly close to her as he grew up. In 410, while the Jin capital Jiankang was under attack by the warlord Lu Xun (盧循), Liu Yu had his assistant Liu Cui (劉粹) accompany the three-year-old Liu Yilong to serve as the defender of Jingkou. In 415, he was created the Duke of Pengcheng. In 417, while Liu Yu was attacking Later Qin, he had Liu Yilong, again assisted by his staff, remain at Pengcheng to serve as the governor of Xu Province (Xuzhou (ancient China)) (徐州, modern northern Jiangsu and Anhui), to guard his rear. In 418, after Liu Yu conquered Later Qin, Liu Yilong was made the governor of the important Jing Province (Jingzhou (ancient China)) (荊州, modern Hubei and Hunan), and commander of armed forces of the western empire. Those who served on his staff included Dao Yanzhi (到彥之), Zhang Shao (張邵), Wang Tanshou (王曇首), Wang Hua (王華), and Shen Linzi (沈林子), with Zhang actually in charge of headquarters due to Liu Yilong's young age. After Liu Yu seized the Jin throne in 420, establishing Liu Song (as Emperor Wu), he created a number of his sons princes, and Liu Yilong was created the Prince of Yidu at that time. Around this time, he became known as studious in the Confucian classics and histories, and was also a good calligrapher (calligraphy). A native of today's Zhenjiang, Liu's traced his ancestry to Shandong. He was orphaned in his youth and chose not to marry, either because of poverty or conviction (or both). Liu studied Buddhism with Sengyou and helped edit sutras at the Dinglin Monastery (定林寺) until his death during the Liang Dynasty. Scribes copied every word by hand, and according to Wilkinson (2000: 274), "The copyists (of whom there were 3,826) were not paid in cash but rewarded with official posts after they had transcribed a given number of words within a set time." Four copies for the emperor were placed in specially constructed libraries in the Forbidden City, Old Summer Palace, Shenyang, and Wenjin Chamber, Chengde. Three additional copies for the public were deposited in ''Siku quanshu'' libraries in Hangzhou, Zhenjiang, and Yangzhou. All seven libraries also received copies of the 1725 imperial encyclopedia ''Gujin tushu jicheng''. '''Danyang''' (Simplified Chinese: 丹阳市; Traditional Chinese: 丹陽市; pinyin: Dānyáng Shì) is a county-level city administered by Zhenjiang in Jiangsu Province, in the People's Republic of China. It is well-known for production of optical lenses. Initially, the only major official who dared to oppose Huan Xuan was Mao Qu (毛璩) the governor of Yi Province (益州, modern Sichuan and Chongqing). However, a conspiracy soon formed among the general Liu Yu (Emperor Wu of Liu Song), Liu Laozhi's nephew He Wuji, and Liu Yi (Liu Yi (Jin Dynasty)) the brother of Huan Xuan's official Liu Mai (劉邁). They were soon joined by a number of other conspirators, and in spring 404 they started the uprising against Huan from the cities of Jingkou (京口, in modern Zhenjiang, Jiangsu) and Guangling. Huan Xuan panicked, and as soon as his cousin Huan Qian (桓謙) the Prince of Xinye lost some relatively minor battles to Liu Yu, Huan fled west with Emperor An, yielding Jiankang to Liu Yu's coalition. Once Liu Yu was in the capital, he declared the reestablishment of Jin, even though the former Jin emperor was still in Huan's hands. Biography Mao was born in Zhenjiang, Jiangsu province. He entered Jiaotong University's Tangshan Engineering College (now Southwest Jiaotong University) and earned his bachelor's degree in civil engineering in 1916. He earned his Master's degree from Cornell University and earned the first Ph.D. ever granted by the Carnegie Institute of Technology (now Carnegie Mellon University) in 1919. His doctoral treatise entitled ''Secondary Stress on Frame Construction'' is treasured at the Hunt Library of Carnegie Mellon University. Early life Liu Yu was born in 363, to his father Liu Qiao (劉翹) and mother Zhao Anzong (趙安宗), while they were living at Jingkou (京口, in modern Zhenjiang, Jiangsu). His great grandfather Liu Hun (劉混) was originally from Pengcheng (彭城, in modern Xuzhou, Jiangsu), before moving to Jingkou. ''Song Shu'', chp. 1 (''The Chronicle of Emperor Wu, Part 1''). Liu Qiao was said to be a 20th generation descendant of Han Dynasty's Prince of Chu, Liu Jiao (劉交), a younger brother of Han's founder Emperor Gaozu of Han. Liu Qiao was a police officer, while Zhao Anzong was the daughter of a commandery governor. They had married in 360, and lived in fair poverty. Lady Zhao died immediately after giving birth to Liu Yu, and Liu Qiao, unable to take care of the child financially or otherwise, considered abandoning the child. Upon hearing this, Liu Yu's aunt, who had given birth to his cousin Liu Huaijing (劉懷敬) less than a year ago, went to Liu Qiao's house and took Liu Yu, weaning Liu Huaijing and giving her milk to Liu Yu instead. At some point, Liu Qiao remarried, and his new wife Xiao Wenshou (Empress Dowager Xiao Wenshou) bore him two sons, Liu Daolian (劉道憐) and Liu Daogui (劉道規). Liu Yu was said to be respectful to his stepmother and treated her as his own mother. '''Chi Mei Corporation''' (


population small

township (Township (People's Republic of China)) and 10subdistricts. class "wikitable" style "font-size:100%;" - ! align left Map ! align left Subdivision ! align left Hanzi ! align left Pinyin ! align left Population ! align left Density

Zhenjiang

'''Zhenjiang''' (Chinese Postal Map Romanisation: '''Chenkiang'''; ) is a city in Jiangsu province, in eastern China. Sitting on the southern bank of the Yangtze River, Zhenjiang is governed as a Prefecture-level city; it borders the provincial capital of Nanjing to the west, Changzhou to the east, and Yangzhou across the river to the north.

Once known as '''Jingjiang''' ( ; Chinese Postal Map Romanisation: '''Kingkow'''), Zhenjiang is today an important transportation hub, owing to its location near the intersection of the Yangtze River and the Grand Canal (Grand Canal of China).

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