Yecapixtla

What is Yecapixtla known for?


complex

Mexico. The town is home to one of the monastery complexes associated with the Monasteries on the Slopes of Popocatépetl World Heritage Site (Monasteries on the slopes of Popocatépetl). Yecapixtla is famously known for its tasty, high-quality beef, cecina (Cecina (meat)) (cured dry meat). The town The town’s historic center surrounds the church and former monastery complex of San Juan Bautista. Immediately surrounding it are the four neighborhoods established in 1550: San Pablo, La

Concepción, Santa Mónica, and San Esteban. The town center around the monastery complex was divided by a number of arroyos (Arroyo (creek)), but most of these have since dried and or have been filled in.

para el Federalismo y el Desarrollo Municipal location Mexico language Spanish trans_title State of Morelos - Yecapixtla accessdate January 23, 2011 The main facade of the monastery complex is to the west, with the back of it facing the main plaza and municipal palace of the town. The town clock is visible from the main plaza; the clock was placed on one of the monastery’s back towers by Father Evaristo Nava in the early 20th century. <


Festivals

State of Mexico. Another annual event is the Feria y Exposición Ganadera or Cattle Expo and Fair. In addition to the showing of animals, there are charreada events, bullfights and number of cultural attractions. Today, Yecapixtla still has a large number of religious festivals and other events. Some of the most important occur on New Year’s Day, Candlemas, Holy

festivals. The facade of the cloister has two levels and is fronted by an arched porch area, called a portería. Above the portería, there are two windows, and the remains of the pilasters of an arch that corresponds to the open chapel, which was like a balcony. However, this balcony area was eventually walled in to make more interior space. The portería contains two arches and a frieze adorned with round forms which protrude. The portería contains the main

period of depopulation in the 18th century when many residents went to work in haciendas in Cuautla and other areas in Morelos. In the 18th century, the Augustinians officially lost control of the monastery complex and the population to regular clergy in 1754. During this time, many of the popular religious festivals such as the Semana de San Juan (Week of Saint John) and Day of the Dead became established in the town and surrounding area, often encouraged


agricultural technical

to the south of the town and slowly the town recovered. Development remained slow until the mid-20th century when new infrastructure such as the reestablishment of electricity and telephone, a new highway and a bank allowed for more economic contact with the outside. The new infrastructure attracted new residents. Public schools were opened in the 1930s and 1940s. An agricultural technical school was opened in 1972. The municipality As municipal seat, the town of Yecapixtla is the local governing authority for over 100 named communities which cover a territory of 192.33km2. - 030 Yecapixtla Yecapixtla -


popular religious

period of depopulation in the 18th century when many residents went to work in haciendas in Cuautla and other areas in Morelos. In the 18th century, the Augustinians officially lost control of the monastery complex and the population to regular clergy in 1754. During this time, many of the popular religious festivals such as the Semana de San Juan (Week of Saint John) and Day of the Dead became established in the town and surrounding area, often encouraged by the new clergy. The development and growth of local religious festivals would continue through the rest of the colonial period and into the 19th century, through the establishment of brotherhoods (cofradías) dedicated to a particular saint or other religious element. Because of its strategic position between the Mexico City area and points south, armies associated with the Mexican War of Independence, Reform War and Mexican Revolution all passed through here. In 1810, Yecapixtla was part of the Jonacatepec municipality. It became an independent municipality in 1869. For a brief period in the late 19th century, Yecapixtla experienced a surge in economic development when a railway was built through connecting it to Mexico City through what is now the eastern panhandle of the State of Mexico. Electricity and telephone were introduced. During this time Evaristo Navo was the head clergyman in the area and is credited with a number of developments including a parish school, the installation of a church organ, with accompanying encouragement of musical training. He also installed the clock on the San Juan Bautista Church. One purpose of the parish school was to preserve and in some cases restitute old traditions which had been lost due to the Liberal reforms of the latter 19th century (Reform War). The school closed in 1911. Further attempts to keep older traditions alive were headed by Juventino Pineda Enriquez who created the “Misiones Culturales” (Cultural Missions). The town shrank again in population due to the Mexican Revolution, with men going off to fight and the remaining women and children dispersing, with some going to Mexico City. The war ruined the town’s economy and after the war, many families who had left never returned. After the war, agriculture returned when an ejido was established to the south of the town and slowly the town recovered. Development remained slow until the mid-20th century when new infrastructure such as the reestablishment of electricity and telephone, a new highway and a bank allowed for more economic contact with the outside. The new infrastructure attracted new residents. Public schools were opened in the 1930s and 1940s. An agricultural technical school was opened in 1972. The municipality As municipal seat, the town of Yecapixtla is the local governing authority for over 100 named communities which cover a territory of 192.33km2. - 030 Yecapixtla Yecapixtla -


stone called

name "fortaleza" History The name Yecapixtla has been translated in a number of ways. Several sources claim that the name refers to the wearing of a stone called a “chalchuihite” through the nose, translating to “land of pierced noses.” This was indeed practiced in the area among pre-Hispanic governors as a sign of their status. This translation may come from documents written by Gutierrez de Lievana from 1580. The Aztec glyph of the area does show a pierced nose. ref


depiction

large atrium (Atrium (architecture)). This atrium is surrounded by a stone wall topped with merlons. The main entrance to the atrium from the street has merlons, as well as the chapels found on each of the wall’s four corners. From the main entrance to the church, there is a volcanic stone walkway, divided by an atrium cross, which has a heart, a chalice and a depiction of the Host (sacramental bread) in low relief. The atrium cross

contained in niches with Plateresque columns and topped with shells. In one corner, there is a seated figure of a sainted pope, whose face and eyes are finely done. Most of the rest of the paintings are narratives, but most of the work has been partially or fully lost, and those that remain are not in good condition. One exception is a depiction of the road to Calvary and the Crucifixion. The vaults of the passageways are decorated with coffers, some of which are hexagons, which may

indicate the influence of Italian architect Sebastian Serlio. The Sala de Profundis, or meditation room, contains well-preserved multichromatic murals which depict a large number of saints including a series of martyrs and a depiction of Saint Augustine. These images are in the process of restoration by the Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia. In the south wing of the cloister there is an entrance to an underground area, which tradition says


images

is not the original. The original was broken by a child in 1961 when he was trying to climb onto its base. The cross fell onto the child killing him. Along the atrium walls on the inside, there are a number of empty niches that remain, which probably held images related to the Stations of the Cross. Access to the chapels in the corners, called capillas posas, is in the atrium. These chapels’ primary function was the house the Host during processions on Corpus

to the current priest’s quarters. Like other cloisters of this area and time, there are remnants of mural work. Near the large doorway to the church, there is a group of four saints done in black and white, which look upon a scene which has since been lost. There are areas that conserve parts of friezes with images drawn in white over a black background, especially in the upper parts of the walls. Images of saints appear on the spaces between the arches, which are drawn to simulate sculptures


local religious

by the new clergy. The development and growth of local religious festivals would continue through the rest of the colonial period and into the 19th century, through the establishment of brotherhoods (cofradías) dedicated to a particular saint or other religious element. Because of its strategic position between the Mexico City area and points south, armies associated with the Mexican War of Independence, Reform War and Mexican Revolution all passed


rock including

are in the north, descending gradually to the south, east and west. Major elevations include Yoteco (2110 masl), Boyero (1824 masl) and Mirador (1882 masl). There are formations of volcanic rock, including basalt. Surface water consists of runoff from Popocateptl into streams and small rivers, many of which have formed deep ravines such as the one named Yecapixtla, which begins in the State of Mexico and passes through Zahuatlán and Mexquemeca. ref name "


volcanic rock

are in the north, descending gradually to the south, east and west. Major elevations include Yoteco (2110 masl), Boyero (1824 masl) and Mirador (1882 masl). There are formations of volcanic rock, including basalt. Surface water consists of runoff from Popocateptl into streams and small rivers, many of which have formed deep ravines such as the one named Yecapixtla, which begins in the State of Mexico and passes through Zahuatlán and Mexquemeca. ref name "

Yecapixtla

'''Yecapixtla''' ( ) is a town and municipality (Municipalities of Mexico) located in the northeast of the state of Morelos in central Mexico. The town is home to one of the monastery complexes associated with the Monasteries on the Slopes of Popocatépetl World Heritage Site (Monasteries on the slopes of Popocatépetl). Yecapixtla is famously known for its tasty, high-quality beef, cecina (Cecina (meat)) (cured dry meat).

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Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017