Yaroslavl

What is Yaroslavl known for?


century+white/

Further reading *


silver work

people eventually came to work. Other trades for which Yaroslavl became a center over the years were in the production of textiles, cosmetics (fragrances) and silver work. As a result of the prosperity enjoyed by the city, Yaroslavl saw a huge expansion in the size of its population over the course of the 17th century, and by the end of this century, the town had a population of around 15,000 people, Fedorčuk 2006, S. 37 making it the second largest city of the Russian Tsardom after Moscow. This period was also particularly important for the urban development of the city, because during the 17th century a multitude of stone-walled churches were built in the city; today these churches still form a major part of the old town's city center. Work on most of these churches was begun with funds gifted to the city by rich local merchants, and thus they had a large say in what form the buildings would eventually take. thumb The living quarters and work place for employees of Yaroslavl's first major industrial enterprise, the city's textiles plant (File:Living quarters for workers of the Yaroslavl Major Manufactory.jpg) In 1658, Yaroslavl endured a disastrous fire which destroyed most of the city's few remaining wooden buildings, including the ancient Kremlin. ''Goroda Rossii. Enciklopedija''. Bolʹšaja Rossijskaja Enciklopedija, Moskau 1994 2006, ISBN 5-7107-7399-9 From this point onwards the city began to develop in the same way as it has done up to this very day, as a city built almost exclusively out of brick and mortar. At the beginning of the 18th century Yaroslavl finally began to transform itself from a trading post into a major industrial town; this largely came about because with the foundation by Peter the Great of Saint Petersburg in 1703, the importance of Arkhangelsk as a port on the Northern Ocean was drastically decreased, and the amount of trade being channeled through the city for export fell accordingly. Luckily, the wealth which Yaroslavl had amassed over its many years as an important trading post allowed it to invest great amounts of money into the development of the city's new industrial base, and thus make the city very attractive to new investors. In 1772 the textiles factory of Ivan Tames opened on the right bank of the Kotorosl. This plant was not only Yaroslavl's first major industrial enterprise, but also one of Russia's largest textiles producers. Amazingly this famous establishment still exists today under the name 'Textile factory 'Krasny Perekop' (russ. WikiPedia:Yaroslavl commons:Ярославль


simple design

of Yaroslavl geraldika.ru: Stadtflagge von Jaroslawl; überprüft am 5 March 2010 was adopted on May 22, 1996. It is a simple design which simply depicts the coat of arms of the city (1995 version), which must take up at least one third of the flag's entire size, upon a light blue background. The whole flag is rectangular in shape. Politics thumb Yevgeny Urlashov (File:urlashov.jpg), former Mayor of Yaroslavl The local government


social diversity

for 'The Modern State: Standards of Democracy and Criteria of Efficiency'. In 2011 Yaroslavl will bring together participants from all over the world to discuss the 2011 agenda: 'The modern state in the age of social diversity'. On September 7, 2011, most of the members of the city's KHL (ice hockey) team, Lokomotiv Yaroslavl, perished in an air crash (2011 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl air disaster) on takeoff from Yaroslavl's Tunoshna Airport. Symbols Yaroslavl currently has


distinct people

Yaroslav (Yaroslav II of Russia) are two distinct people). Those are said by Fomenko to have been introduced into the original text by later editors. * WikiPedia:Yaroslavl commons:Ярославль


main stone

' for several ages Russian architecture was influenced predominantly by the Byzantine architecture, until the Fall of Constantinople. Apart from fortifications (kremlins), the main stone buildings of aincient Rus' were Orthodox churches, with their many domes, often gilded or brightly painted. Aristotle Fioravanti and other Italian architects brought Renaissance trends into Russia. The 16th century saw the development of unique tent-like churches culminating in Saint Basil's Cathedral. By that time the onion dome design was also fully developed. In the 17th century, the "fiery style" of ornamentation flourished in Moscow and Yaroslavl, gradually paving the way for the Naryshkin baroque of the 1690s. After Peter the Great reforms (Reforms of Peter I of Russia) had made Russia much closer to Western culture, the change of the architectural styles in Russia generally followed that of Western Europe. Kazan, the capital of Tatarstan, shows a unique mix of Christian Russian (Russians) and Muslim Tatar (Tatars) cultures. The city has rigistered a brand ''The Third Capital of Russia'', though a number of other major Russian cities compete for this status, like Novosibirsk, Yekaterinburg and Nizhny Novgorod, all being major cultural centers with rich history and prominent architecture. Veliky Novgorod, Pskov and the cities of Golden Ring (Vladimir (Vladimir (city)), Yaroslavl, Kostroma and others) have at best preserved the architecture and the spirit of ancient and medieval Rus' (Rus' (name)), and also are among the main tourist destinations. Many old fortifications (List of castles in Russia) (typically Kremlins), monasteries (List of Russian Orthodox monasteries) and churches (Russian Orthodox Church) are scattered throughout Russia, forming its unique cultural landscape both in big cities and in remote areas. Fourteen cities were included in the proposal, which divided them into five different clusters: one in the north, centered on St. Petersburg, a central cluster, centered on Moscow, a southern cluster, centered on Sochi, and the Volga River cluster. Only one city beyond the Ural Mountains was cited, Yekaterinburg. The other cities were: Kaliningrad in the north cluster, Rostov-on-Don and Krasnodar in the south cluster and Yaroslavl, Nizhny Novgorod, Kazan, Saransk, Samara (Samara, Russia) and Volgograd in the Volga River cluster. WikiPedia:Yaroslavl commons:Ярославль


large+classical

. This led to another wave of building works in the city, the results of which are still visible in the city today. With the Ilyinskaya Square and Church of Elijah the Prophet at its center, the new plan called for the development of a network of long boulevards and streets which would be bordered by large classical style buildings and numerous city parks. A prominent example of this later development is the former House of Charity (built in 1786), which is now one of the buildings of the city's


important accomplishments

WikiPedia:Yaroslavl commons:Ярославль


unique mix

). Tsar Alexis sent a garrison of Streltsy to protect the fort from Cossack incursions. Despite these efforts, the Cossack rebel Stepan Razin held the town in 1667 and 1668. The fort gradually lost its strategic significance and was demolished in 1810. Between 1708 and 1992 the city was known as ''Guriev''. Kazan, the capital of Tatarstan, shows a unique mix of Christian Russian (Russians) and Muslim Tatar (Tatars) cultures. The city has rigistered a brand ''The Third

, shows a unique mix of Christian Russian (Russians) and Muslim Tatar (Tatars) cultures. The city has rigistered a brand ''The Third Capital of Russia'', though a number of other major Russian cities compete for this status, like Novosibirsk, Yekaterinburg and Nizhny Novgorod, all being major cultural centers with rich history and prominent architecture. Veliky Novgorod, Pskov and the cities of Golden Ring (Vladimir (Vladimir (city)), Yaroslavl, Kostroma and others


style show

and bishops were arrested and executed, including St. Veniamin (Veniamin of Petersburg), Metropolitan of Petrograd (+1922). Patriarch Tikhon (Tikhon of Moscow) (Bellavin) was put under house arrest in 1922 and preparations were made for a Bolshevik-styleshow trial”. In such a situation, in May 1922, Tikhon commissioned Archbishop Agathangel (Archbishop Agathangel of Yaroslav) (Preobrazhensky) of Yaroslavl to carry out patriarchal duties. With Agathangel delayed in Yaroslavl by Soviet authorities, a group of reform-oriented Orthodox clergy seized the chancery offices of the Patriarchate and proclaimed themselves to be the ''Higher Church Administration'' (''Высшее церковное управление''), the highest ecclesiastical authority in the Church. The first President of the HCA was the retired bishop Antonin (Antonin Granovsky) (Granovsky; 1865–1927) -– a highly learned, but eccentric cleric, soon elevated by the Renovationists to ''Metropolitan of Moscow''. Not surprisingly, the new "administration" had soon received recognition from the Soviet government. - Flight 9634 (2011 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl air disaster) near Yaroslavl September 7, 2011 Yakovlev Yak-42D Pilot error - Legacy In the wake of the catastrophe, a central square in Yaroslavl was renamed after the ''Chelyuskintsy'', as was Chelyuskinites Park in Minsk; Marina Tsvetayeva wrote a poem applauding the rescue team. On 1970, the East German (East Germany) television had produced ''Tscheljuskin'', a film about the ship's voyage, directed by Rainer Hausdorf and featuring Eberhard Mellies as Prof. Schmidt, Dieter Mann as the surveyor Vasiliev and Fritz Diez as Valerian Kuybyshev. Tscheljuskin on the IMDb. Efforts to find the wreck of the ship have been made by at least four different expeditions. Consequently, there are many thousands of documents that are considered authentic in traditional history, but not in New Chronology. Fomenko often uses "falsified" documents, which he dismisses in other contexts, to prove a point. For example, he analyzes the Tartar Relation and arrives at the conclusion that Mongolian capital of Karakorum was located in Central Russia (equated with present-day Yaroslavl.) However, the Tartar Relation makes several statements that are at odds with New Chronology (such as that Batu Khan and Russian duke Yaroslav (Yaroslav II of Russia) are two distinct people). Those are said by Fomenko to have been introduced into the original text by later editors. * WikiPedia:Yaroslavl commons:Ярославль

Yaroslavl

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