Yarmouth, Nova Scotia

What is Yarmouth, Nova Scotia known for?


shelburne nova scotia

and Southwestern Railway was built along the south shore linking Yarmouth with Shelburne (Shelburne, Nova Scotia), Liverpool (Liverpool, Nova Scotia), Bridgewater (Bridgewater, Nova Scotia) and Halifax (City of Halifax) in the early 20th century; the H&SW was eventually merged into the Canadian National Railway (CNR). While iron-hulled steamships had led to the decline of Yarmouth's once-thriving wooden shipbuilding industry, they also made the port a vital connection between Nova

- Kenora, Ontario - CDL5 Doctor's Lake East Water Aerodrome Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia), Nova Scotia - - CDL6 Doctor's Lake West Water Aerodrome Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia), Nova Scotia - - CDU3 Yarmouth (Regional Hospital) Heliport (List of heliports in Canada#292) Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia), Nova Scotia - left thumb 180px Shelburne, Nova Scotia (Image:Shelburnecountymuseum.jpg) waterfront showing grey paint

finishes applied for the 1995 film. The film was shot in British Columbia on Vancouver Island in and around Campbell River BC. (Beaverlodge Lands *now Rockland Road and North Island College Timberline Secondary*,Lupin Falls and Myra Falls in Strathcona Provincial Park, Little Oyster River, and White River) and in the Nova Scotia towns of Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia) and Shelburne (Shelburne, Nova Scotia) in 1994. In Shelburne, the waterfront area was substantially altered to resemble a Puritan New England town in the mid-17th century. Some of the buildings on Dock Street retain the grey-tone paint finishes used for the film. death_date '''Yarmouth''' is a provincial electoral district (electoral district (Canada)) in Nova Scotia, Canada, that elects one member of the Nova Scotia House of Assembly. It consists of the Municipality of the District of Yarmouth (Yarmouth (municipal district), Nova Scotia) and the town of Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia). Fishing and fish processing continue to drive the economy here, although tourism and small manufacturing are now also employers. The largest town in the district is Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia). Personal life Endicott was born in Golden (Golden, British Columbia), British Columbia in 1958, grew up in Halifax (City of Halifax) and Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia), Nova Scotia, and Toronto (Toronto, Ontario), Ontario. She worked as an actor before moving to London, England, where she began to write fiction. Returning to Canada in 1984, she went west to Saskatoon and worked in theatre as a director (theatre director) and dramaturge. She was for many years the dramaturge of the Saskatchewan Playwrights Centre. In 1992 she went farther west with husband Peter Ormshaw to Mayerthorpe (Mayerthorpe, Alberta), Alberta, on his first posting with the RCMP; Ormshaw has also had two careers, first as a poet then as a Mountie - Wall Street Journal p. W3, 2 April 2010 they have since lived in Cochrane and Edmonton, and have two children: Will (1993) and Rachel (1996). They presently (2012) live in Edmonton, Alberta. In 2002, the Truro Bearcats played in their first Fred Page Cup as the host squad, They made two other appearances as MJAHL champions, one in 2005, at a tournament hosted in Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia) Nova Scotia, and one in 2007 Saint-Jérôme (Saint-Jérôme, Quebec) Quebec. The Bearcats have never played in a Fred Page Cup final. It is located in the western part of the province and connects Bedford (Bedford, Nova Scotia) with Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia) via the Annapolis Valley. It was known for many year as "the Post Road". The route runs parallel to, and in some places has been replaced by, Highway 101 (Nova Scotia Highway 101). Trunk 1 often forms the main street in communities that Highway 101 bypasses. At Weymouth (Weymouth, Nova Scotia), Trunk 1 re-appears, and continues south along the coast through the Municipality of Clare (Clare, Nova Scotia) to its end in downtown Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia) on Main Street at the ferry terminal to Bar Harbor (Bar Harbor, Maine), Maine where it meets the Trunk 3 (Nova Scotia Trunk 3). Originally named '''Kingston Station''', the village was located on the Halifax (City of Halifax)-Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia) main line of the Dominion Atlantic Railway and developed into a local service and light manufacturing centre. History The community was first known as Nine Mile River after the river in the centre of the community which fed several early mills. The St. Margaret's Bay Road was routed through the village in the mid 19th century, relocated for an earlier location further south. Several hotels were established to cater to travelers and later sportsmen and the Nine Mile River was crossed by an arched stone bridge which still survives, one of the only surviving stone bridges in Nova Scotia. After the arrival of the Halifax and Southwestern Railway in 1904, the community was referred to as Bowser's Station, after Angus Bowser, who ran a hotel near the area's train station near Greenwood Heights. It was renamed Timberlea in 1922 to reflect the importance of the forest and lumbering. Alfreda Withrow, ''One City, Many Communities'', Nimbus Publishing, Halifax (1999), p. 169 Aubrey Fraser was an early settler in the area, and he, his father and brothers stationed a saw mill along the Nine Mile River. Almost a decade following the Halifax Explosion, the Bowser's Hotel was sold to Mr. and Mrs. William Miller. It had been a frequent stop for people traveling along the St. Margaret's Bay Road, between Halifax (City of Halifax) and Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia). The Hotel was leveled in a fire, on the night of December 12, 1947. Until the early 1990s, it was a semi-rural, fairly close-knit community. Subsequently, several large developments such as Greenwood Heights have substantially increased the population, and it is now mostly a suburban community.


292

in a regiment of cavalry. He married New York native Margaret Moore on October 14, 1856, in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia. In 1857 he resigned from the army and moved to the United States, settling in Vinton, Iowa, where he taught school. - Yarmouth (Regional Hospital) Heliport (List of heliports in Canada#292) CDU3 Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia), Nova Scotia - - Yarmouth Airport CYQI YQI Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia), Nova Scotia - - Doctor's

;div id "292" Yarmouth (Regional Hospital) CDU3 Private Yarmouth Regional Hospital Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia) NS (Nova Scotia) - * '''CYQH''' (YQH) - Watson Lake Airport - Watson Lake (Watson Lake, Yukon), Yukon * '''CYQI''' (YQI) - Yarmouth Airport - Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia), Nova Scotia * '''CYQK''' (YQK) - Kenora Airport

- Kenora, Ontario - CDL5 Doctor's Lake East Water Aerodrome Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia), Nova Scotia - - CDL6 Doctor's Lake West Water Aerodrome Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia), Nova Scotia - - CDU3 Yarmouth (Regional Hospital) Heliport (List of heliports in Canada#292) Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia), Nova Scotia - left thumb 180px Shelburne, Nova Scotia (Image:Shelburnecountymuseum.jpg) waterfront showing grey paint


shooting range

Squadron and several Eastern Air Command Bomber Reconnaissance Squadrons, such as 162 Squadron (No. 162 Squadron RCAF). The Air Base was home to the 9th Light Anti-Aircraft Artillery, various RCAF and RAF Bomber Squadrons and an Army Co-operation Reconnaissance Flight. Its primary function was as an administrative and logistical support base to the RAF and RCAF squadrons in the area, in addition to providing a Weather Information Section, an Armament Section and a Shooting range firing


great size

for courageous crews such as the ship ''Research'' (Research (ship)) in 1861 and ships noted for great size such as the ship ''County of Yarmouth'' in 1884, one of the largest wooden hull ships ever built in Canada. John Patch, the son of one Yarmouth sea captain developed and built one of the first modern screw propeller in 1832 (4 years before John Ericsson's patent). First demonstrated in Yarmouth Harbour during the summer of 1833, Patch was unsuccessful in a patent application in that year, but he continued to improve his propeller and received an American patent in 1849 Mario Theriault, ''Great Maritime Inventions'' Goose Lane Publishing (2001) p. 58-59 which drew praise in American scientific circles. "Patch's Propeller", ''Scientific America'', Vol. 4, No. 5 (October 10, 1848) p. 33, featured in ''The Archimedes Screw'' website retrieved 31 January 2010 However by 1849 there were multiple competing versions of the screw propeller. Patch never received money or recognition and died a poor man at Yarmouth in 1861. "John Patch", ''Famous, should-be Famous and Infamous Canadians'' retrieved 31 Dec 2010. Railways As wooden shipbuilding declined in the late 19th century, Yarmouth's shipowners re-invested their capital into factories, iron-hulled steamship (Steamboat)s, and railways. The town's first railway was the locally owned Western Counties Railway which was built from Yarmouth to Digby (Digby, Nova Scotia) in the 1870s. It eventually was merged into the Dominion Atlantic Railway (DAR), with a network extending into the Annapolis Valley, Halifax (City of Halifax) and Truro (Truro, Nova Scotia); the DAR later became a subsidiary of Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR). The Halifax and Southwestern Railway was built along the south shore linking Yarmouth with Shelburne (Shelburne, Nova Scotia), Liverpool (Liverpool, Nova Scotia), Bridgewater (Bridgewater, Nova Scotia) and Halifax (City of Halifax) in the early 20th century; the H&SW was eventually merged into the Canadian National Railway (CNR). While iron-hulled steamships had led to the decline of Yarmouth's once-thriving wooden shipbuilding industry, they also made the port a vital connection between Nova Scotia's rail lines and steamships destined for Boston and New York (New York City). Rail services were abandoned to Yarmouth in stages, beginning in 1982 (CNR) and ending in 1990 (CPR). Steamships and ferries Tourism has been a major industry in Yarmouth since the 1880s when Loran Ellis Baker founded the Yarmouth Steamship Company. Steamship and railway promotion based in Yarmouth created the first tourism marketing in Nova Scotia. Jay White, "Canada's Ocean Playground: The Tourism Industry in Nova Scotia, 1870-1970", ''Nova Scotia Archives and Records Management'' Baker's steamships operated between Yarmouth and Boston until 1900, when the company was purchased by the Dominion Atlantic Railway. The DAR and Halifax and Southwestern Railway offered connections for passengers arriving in Yarmouth with steamship services operating to New York City and Boston. In 1939, examiners at Yarmouth's Merchant Marine Institution made seafaring history by issuing master's papers to Molly Kool, the first female ship captain in the Western World. Steamship connections between Yarmouth and Boston New York were maintained by Eastern Steamship Lines but ended with the start of World War II, the SS ''Yarmouth Castle'' (SS Yarmouth Castle) being one of the last vessels to serve this route. CNR, CN Marine & Marine Atlantic Following the war, the absence of a steamship connection led citizens of southwestern Nova Scotia to undertake an extensive lobbying effort with the federal government to establish a ferry service in the Gulf of Maine connecting Yarmouth with a port in New England. In 1949 the Canadian Maritime Commission began to study the possibility of a ferry service connecting with a port in Maine and later focused its effort on a service from Yarmouth to Bar Harbor (Bar Harbor, Maine). In 1954 the federal government contracted Davie Shipbuilding to construct MV ''Bluenose'' (MV Bluenose) which was launched in 1955 and began service in 1956 under the management of Canadian National Railway (CNR) and later (1977-1982) under the management of a federal Crown corporation named CN Marine. In 1978 CN Marine started operating MV ''Marine Evangeline'' (MV Marine Evangeline) on a service from Yarmouth to Portland, Maine. In 1982 the old ''Bluenose'' was retired from the Bar Harbor service and sold. CN Marine replaced her with a newer vessel MV ''Stena Jutlandica'' (MV Stena Jutlandica) which was renamed MV ''Bluenose'' to prevent confusion in tourism marketing literature. In 1986 CN Marine was reorganized into the Crown corporation Marine Atlantic and in 1997 the federal government decided to end its financial support for the Gulf of Maine ferry service, soliciting proposals from private sector ferry companies to operate the route. Lion Ferry, Prince of Fundy Cruises, Scotia Prince Cruises The growth of post-war automobile-based tourism saw the provincial government encourage additional ferry service with New England, a region with many family connections to the Maritimes dating to the 18th century and which accelerated during the first half of the 20th century. In 1970 the MV ''Bluenose'' service operated by CNR was joined by the MS ''Prince of Fundy'' (MS Prince of Fundy) on a route connecting Yarmouth with Portland, Maine operated by Lion Ferry. The service was supplemented between 1973-1976 by MS ''Bolero'' (MS Bolero), however by 1976 both vessels were replaced by the MS ''Caribe'' (MS Caribe). Lion Ferry sold Yarmouth's second ferry service to Prince of Fundy Cruises (Scotia Prince Cruises) who purchased MS ''Stena Olympica'' (MS Stena Olympica) and renamed it MS ''Scotia Prince''. The service underwent another ownership change in 2000 and was renamed Scotia Prince Cruises. In 2004 the company discovered toxic mould in its Portland terminal, owned by the City of Portland, canceling its 2005 season. The City of Portland subsequently canceled the company's lease and evicted Scotia Prince Cruises, thus ending this ferry service. Bay Ferries In 1997 Bay Ferries, a subsidiary of Northumberland Ferries Limited, was the successful bidder for the federal government's Gulf of Maine ferry service. Only the operating license was transferred as well as the right to be the primary user of the federal government-owned ferry terminals in Yarmouth and Bar Harbor; the service would receive no subsidy from the federal government. Bay Ferries purchased MV ''Bluenose'' from Marine Atlantic and used that vessel for the remainder of the 1997 season before selling it. In 1998 Bay Ferries introduced the first high speed catamaran passenger-vehicle ferry service in North America when it purchased HSC ''Incat 046'' (HSC INCAT 046) from Incat in an aggressive bid to expand the Yarmouth - Bar Harbor ferry service. Throughout the 1990s the market for ferry services in southwestern Nova Scotia were threatened by significant expansions of 4-lane expressways in northern Nova Scotia and across southern New Brunswick so it was theorized that the Yarmouth - Bar Harbor ferry service could maintain market share if the ferry voyage time was shortened. Marketed as "The Cat", the use of the ferry service grew largely due to Bay Ferries' investment and the novelty of riding the ultra-modern high speed catamaran. In 2002 Bay Ferries traded in HSC ''Incat 046'' for a larger vessel HSC ''The Cat'' (HSC The Cat) which was also marketed as "The Cat". Beginning in 2003, Bay Ferries began operating HSC ''The Cat'' during the winter months on services in the Caribbean. Following the end of the service offered by Scotia Prince Cruises in 2004, Bay Ferries began operating HSC ''The Cat'' in 2006 between Yarmouth to Portland, in addition to Bar Harbor; the old Portland ferry terminal being replaced by the newly built Ocean Gateway International Marine Passenger Terminal. Following a decline in American tourism to Nova Scotia, as well as record-high fuel prices, Bay Ferries sought subsidies from the federal and provincial governments for its Gulf of Maine ferry service. The federal government refused to provide a subsidy, having removed itself from operating such a service in 1997. However, the provincial government offered a subsidy to cover the operating loss and this was subsequently provided in 2007, 2008 and 2009. In 2009 the provincial government canceled the subsidy and Bay Ferries announced in December 2009 that it was ending its ferry service and sold the vessel. '''Yarmouth''' is a provincial electoral district (electoral district (Canada)) in Nova Scotia, Canada, that elects one member of the Nova Scotia House of Assembly. It consists of the Municipality of the District of Yarmouth (Yarmouth (municipal district), Nova Scotia) and the town of Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia). Fishing and fish processing continue to drive the economy here, although tourism and small manufacturing are now also employers. The largest town in the district is Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia). Personal life Endicott was born in Golden (Golden, British Columbia), British Columbia in 1958, grew up in Halifax (City of Halifax) and Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia), Nova Scotia, and Toronto (Toronto, Ontario), Ontario. She worked as an actor before moving to London, England, where she began to write fiction. Returning to Canada in 1984, she went west to Saskatoon and worked in theatre as a director (theatre director) and dramaturge. She was for many years the dramaturge of the Saskatchewan Playwrights Centre. In 1992 she went farther west with husband Peter Ormshaw to Mayerthorpe (Mayerthorpe, Alberta), Alberta, on his first posting with the RCMP; Ormshaw has also had two careers, first as a poet then as a Mountie - Wall Street Journal p. W3, 2 April 2010 they have since lived in Cochrane and Edmonton, and have two children: Will (1993) and Rachel (1996). They presently (2012) live in Edmonton, Alberta. In 2002, the Truro Bearcats played in their first Fred Page Cup as the host squad, They made two other appearances as MJAHL champions, one in 2005, at a tournament hosted in Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia) Nova Scotia, and one in 2007 Saint-Jérôme (Saint-Jérôme, Quebec) Quebec. The Bearcats have never played in a Fred Page Cup final. It is located in the western part of the province and connects Bedford (Bedford, Nova Scotia) with Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia) via the Annapolis Valley. It was known for many year as "the Post Road". The route runs parallel to, and in some places has been replaced by, Highway 101 (Nova Scotia Highway 101). Trunk 1 often forms the main street in communities that Highway 101 bypasses. At Weymouth (Weymouth, Nova Scotia), Trunk 1 re-appears, and continues south along the coast through the Municipality of Clare (Clare, Nova Scotia) to its end in downtown Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia) on Main Street at the ferry terminal to Bar Harbor (Bar Harbor, Maine), Maine where it meets the Trunk 3 (Nova Scotia Trunk 3). Originally named '''Kingston Station''', the village was located on the Halifax (City of Halifax)-Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia) main line of the Dominion Atlantic Railway and developed into a local service and light manufacturing centre. History The community was first known as Nine Mile River after the river in the centre of the community which fed several early mills. The St. Margaret's Bay Road was routed through the village in the mid 19th century, relocated for an earlier location further south. Several hotels were established to cater to travelers and later sportsmen and the Nine Mile River was crossed by an arched stone bridge which still survives, one of the only surviving stone bridges in Nova Scotia. After the arrival of the Halifax and Southwestern Railway in 1904, the community was referred to as Bowser's Station, after Angus Bowser, who ran a hotel near the area's train station near Greenwood Heights. It was renamed Timberlea in 1922 to reflect the importance of the forest and lumbering. Alfreda Withrow, ''One City, Many Communities'', Nimbus Publishing, Halifax (1999), p. 169 Aubrey Fraser was an early settler in the area, and he, his father and brothers stationed a saw mill along the Nine Mile River. Almost a decade following the Halifax Explosion, the Bowser's Hotel was sold to Mr. and Mrs. William Miller. It had been a frequent stop for people traveling along the St. Margaret's Bay Road, between Halifax (City of Halifax) and Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia). The Hotel was leveled in a fire, on the night of December 12, 1947. Until the early 1990s, it was a semi-rural, fairly close-knit community. Subsequently, several large developments such as Greenwood Heights have substantially increased the population, and it is now mostly a suburban community.


liberal conservative

sailing vessels from his yards at Hantsport, Nova Scotia including the barque Hamburg (Hamburg (barque)), the largest three masted sailing barque ever built in Canada. He represented Falmouth township in the provincial assembly from 1855 to 1859 and then represented the North division of Hants County from 1859 to 1867. Churchill was appointed February 3, 1871 to the Senate and represented the Liberal-Conservative Party. During the 1970s-1980s, CN Rail and later Via Rail operated


modern high

and the novelty of riding the ultra-modern high speed catamaran. In 2002 Bay Ferries traded in HSC ''Incat 046'' for a larger vessel HSC ''The Cat'' (HSC The Cat) which was also marketed as "The Cat". Beginning in 2003, Bay Ferries began operating HSC ''The Cat'' during the winter months on services in the Caribbean. Following the end of the service offered by Scotia Prince Cruises in 2004, Bay Ferries began operating HSC ''The Cat'' in 2006 between Yarmouth to Portland


outstanding feature

seasons in which falls are warmer than spring since the waters are at the warmest temperatures in fall and the coldest during early spring. Precipitation is significant, averaging over a year, with July and August the driest months on average and November the wettest month on average. An outstanding feature is Yarmouth's late-fall to early-winter precipitation maximum, owing to the combination of intense storm activity from November


quot religious

; ref class "wikitable" + Religious make-up (2001) Statistics Canada Religious make-up, for Yarmouth, 2001 census - 100% data - ! Religion ! Population ! Pct


played guitar

, Kerr frequently played guitar in folk (folk music) clubs in Toronto's Yorkville (Yorkville, Toronto) district working alongside groups such as Steppenwolf (Steppenwolf (band)), the Mynah Birds, Rick James, Gordon Lightfoot and Joni Mitchell, and wrote songs for the then unknown Neil Young. He was born in Somerset, Nova Scotia, the son of Randel Ilsley and Catherine Caldwell. Ilsley was educated at Acadia University and Dalhousie University


community+covers

also very nearby, lies within Digby County. The community covers 81.46 km 2 . History '''CJLS-FM''' is a radio station that broadcasts on 95.5 FM (FM radio) from Yarmouth, Nova Scotia. It was one of the first radio stations in the Maritimes. CJLS was founded by Laurie Smith in 1934. Leyland G. Trask purchased the company from the Smith Family in 1968. In 1998, Gerry Boudreau, Chris Perry and Ray Zinck, all former employees of CJLS

Yarmouth, Nova Scotia

leader_title3 MLA leader_name3 Zach Churchill (L) (Nova Scotia Liberal Party) leader_title4 MP leader_name4 Greg Kerr (C) (Conservative Party of Canada) established_title Founded established_date June 9, 1761 established_title2 Incorporated established_date2 August 6, 1890 established_title3 established_date3 area_magnitude unit_pref area_footnotes 2011 Statistics Canada Community Profile: Yarmouth, Nova Scotia area_total_km2 area_land_km2 10.56 area_water_km2 population_as_of 2011 population_footnotes population_note population_total 6,761 population_density_km2 640.3 population_blank1_title Change  (2006-11) population_blank1 5.6% timezone AST (Atlantic Standard Time) utc_offset -4 timezone_DST ADT utc_offset_DST -3 latd 43 latm 50 lats 10 latNS N longd 66 longm 07 longs 03 longEW W coordinates_display inline,title elevation_footnotes elevation_min_m 0 elevation_max_m 43 postal_code_type Postal code(s) (Canadian postal code) postal_code B (List of B postal codes of Canada)5A area_code 902 (Area code 902) area_code_type Area code (North American Numbering Plan) blank_name Dwellings blank_info 3,323 blank1_name Median Income* blank1_info $31,584 CDN (Canadian dollar) blank2_name NTS (National Topographic System) Map blank2_info 020O16 blank3_name GNBC (Geographical Names Board of Canada) Code blank3_info CBPIB

'''Yarmouth''' is a town (General Service Area) and port located on the Gulf of Maine in southwestern Nova Scotia, Canada. Yarmouth is the shire town of Yarmouth County (Yarmouth County, Nova Scotia) and is largest population centre in the region.

Long connected to fishing due to its proximity to Georges Bank, the town is located in the heart of the world's largest lobster fishing grounds and as a result receives Canada's largest lobster landings each year. Town of Yarmouth website

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