White House

What is White House known for?

modern independent

was being modelled on the ground and first floors The ''ground'' and ''first'' floors in British English are called the ''first'' and ''second'' floors in American English. of Leinster House, then the residence of the Duke of Leinster, one of the leading peers in the Irish House of Lords, and now the seat of the modern independent Irish parliament, Oireachtas Éireann. Image:Spurs White House.jpg thumb left Duncan (middle) and the Spurs

work arts

; The choice of Thomas for the White House collection was described as an ideal symbol for the Obama administration by New York Times art critic Holland Cotter. Cotter described Thomas

site national

Judd, p. 189; Rhodes James, p. 344 '''Pennsylvania Avenue''' is a street in Washington, D.C. that joins the White House and the United States Capitol. Called "America's Main Street", Pennsylvania Avenue, National Historic Site. National Park Service. it is the location of official parades and processions, as well as protest marches. Moreover, Pennsylvania Avenue is an important commuter route

arts national

Charisse 2006 National Medal of Arts.jpg right thumb 200px Accepting the National Medal of Arts and Humanities Award in 2006, photo by Paul Morse On November 9, 2006, in a private White House ceremony, President George W. Bush presented Cyd Charisse with the National Medal of the Arts and Humanities (National Medal of Arts), the highest official U.S. honor available in the arts. ''Washington Post'' coverage of her award presentation at the White House Collections holding works by Hiram Powers include the Addison Gallery of American Art (Andover, Massachusetts), the Amon Carter Museum (Texas), the Arizona State University Art Museum, the Art Gallery of the University of Rochester (New York), the Birmingham Museum of Art (Alabama), the Brooklyn Museum of Art (New York City), the Carnegie Museum of Art (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania), the Chrysler Museum of Art (Norfolk, Virginia), the Cincinnati Art Museum , the Corcoran Gallery of Art (Washington D.C.), Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College (Florida), Dallas Museum of Art (Texas), Detroit Institute of Arts, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, the Glencairn Museum (Pennsylvania), the Greenville County Museum of Art (South Carolina), Harvard University Art Museums, the Honolulu Museum of Art, the Hudson River Museum (Yonkers, New York), the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Milwaukee Art Museum, Miami University, the Morse Museum of American Art (Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art), (Florida), the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston the National Gallery of Art (Washington D.C.), the Newark Museum (New Jersey), the North Carolina Museum of Art, the Portland Museum of Art (Maine), the Smithsonian American Art Museum (Washington D.C.), the United States Senate Art Collection, the University of Cincinnati Galleries (Ohio), the University of Michigan Museum of Art, the Vermont State House Fine Arts Collection (Vermont State House) (Montpelier, Vermont), the White House Collection (White House), (Washington), the Yale University Art Gallery (New Haven, Connecticut) and Edward Lee McClain High School (McClain High School (Greenfield, Ohio)) (Greenfield, Ohio). Residence In 1859, Lee's father-in-law, Francis Preston Blair, built a house for Lee and his wife (Francis's daughter Elizabeth Blair (Elizabeth Blair Lee)) next door to his own. These two houses, within a block of the White House in Washington, D.C., were later combined into one house and became the property of the U.S. government. Today they are the Blair-Lee House, used by the President (President of the United States) as his guest house. Upon retirement he moved to the family home in Silver Spring, Maryland, where he died on 7 June 1897. Celebrity In the 1970s, Olympic athletes were considered amateur and were absolutely not allowed to seek or accept payment for their position as a sports celebrity. In 1972, three major Olympic titles (basketball, 100 meters and decathlon), were won by Soviet athletes during the Cold War. Winning 'back' the decathlon title made Jenner an American hero. After his Olympic success, Jenner set out to cash in on his celebrity (requiring him to give up any future Olympic appearances). He left his vaulting poles in the stadium, having no intention of ever using them again. Quickly after the Games, Jenner appeared on the front of Wheaties brand breakfast cereal as a "Wheaties champion." Of several hundred athletes who have been so featured, Jenner is one of seven Wheaties "spokesmen." He was invited to the White House to meet with President Gerald R. Ford, who autographed a political cartoon that featured the pair. People of Irish descent are the second largest self-reported ethnic group in the United States, after German Americans. Nine of the signatories of the American Declaration of Independence were of Irish origin. WikiPedia:White House, Tennessee Dmoz:Regional North_America United_States Tennessee Localities W White_House

great songs

is America to Me)", were great songs of inspiration to the Roosevelts and the country during World War II. After the President's death, White's younger brother William White became Eleanor Roosevelt's personal assistant, house manager and chauffeur for the remainder on her life. thumb right 300px The 2005 Blue Room Christmas Tree (File:2005 Blue Room Christmas tree.jpg) The '''White House Christmas Tree''', also known as the '''Blue Room Christmas Tree

quot establishing

Writers' Project year 1937 page 210

conservative publication

), New Hampshire (1999) and Utah (2000) were the last three states to recognize the holiday. *According to FrontPage Magazine, a conservative publication, former U.S. White House counterterrorism chief Juan Zarate said: "The Muslim Brotherhood is a group that worries us not because

international coverage

a decorated egg from each state to display at easter. Overview ''The Post'' is generally regarded as one of the leading daily American newspapers, WikiPedia:White House, Tennessee Dmoz:Regional North_America United_States Tennessee Localities W White_House


Room (White House) Red Room as designed by Stéphane Boudin during the administration of John F. Kennedy Jacqueline Kennedy, wife of President John F. Kennedy (1961–63), directed a very extensive and historic redecoration of the house. She enlisted the help of Henry Francis du Pont of the Winterthur Museum to assist in collecting artifacts for the mansion, many of which had once been housed there. Other antiques, fine

paintings, and improvements of the Kennedy period were donated to the White House by wealthy philanthropists, including the Crowninshield family, Jane Engelhard, Jayne Wrightsman, and the Oppenheimer family. Stéphane Boudin of the House of Jansen (Maison Jansen), a Paris interior-design firm that had been recognized worldwide, was employed by Mrs. Kennedy to assist with the decoration. Different periods of the early republic and world

books books

thumb The White House 2003 Christmas decoration using Curious George as the theme with the Barbara Bush portrait. Margret and H.A. Rey released seven "Curious George" books during H.A. Rey's lifetime. More recently, more Curious George books have been released by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt including board books with scenes from the original books, books adapted from the 1980s telefilm series, and new adventures. File:Crosley Field from behind home plate.jpg thumb left

White House

The '''White House''' is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States, located at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW (Northwest, Washington, D.C.) in Washington, D.C. It has been the residence of every U.S. president since John Adams in 1800.

The house was designed by Irish-born James Hoban

In 1814, during the War of 1812, the mansion was set ablaze by the British Army in the Burning of Washington, destroying the interior and charring much of the exterior. Reconstruction began almost immediately, and President James Monroe moved into the partially reconstructed Executive Residence in October 1817. Construction continued with the addition of the South Portico in 1824 and the North in 1829.

Because of crowding within the executive mansion itself, President Theodore Roosevelt had all work offices relocated to the newly constructed West Wing in 1901. Eight years later, President William Howard Taft expanded the West Wing and created the first Oval Office which was eventually moved as the section was expanded. The third-floor attic was converted to living quarters in 1927 by augmenting the existing hip roof with long shed dormers. A newly constructed East Wing was used as a reception area for social events; Jefferson's colonnades connected the new wings.

East Wing alterations were completed in 1946, creating additional office space. By 1948, the house's load-bearing exterior walls and internal wood beams were found to be close to failure. Under Harry S. Truman, the interior rooms were completely dismantled and a new internal load-bearing steel frame constructed inside the walls. Once this work was completed, the interior rooms were rebuilt.

Today, the White House Complex includes the Executive Residence, West Wing, East Wing, the Eisenhower Executive Office Building—the former State Department, which now houses offices for the President's staff and the Vice President—and Blair House, a guest residence.

The Executive Residence is made up of six stories—the Ground Floor, State Floor, Second Floor, and Third Floor, as well as a two-story basement (White House basement). The term ''White House'' is often used as a metonym (Metonymy) for the Executive Office of the President of the United States and for the president's administration and advisers in general, as in "''The White House has decided that...."''. The property is a National Heritage Site (National Heritage Site (United States)) owned by the National Park Service and is part of the President's Park. In 2007, it was ranked second on the American Institute of Architects list of "America's Favorite Architecture".

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