West Island

What is West Island known for?


large open

is almost identical to that of Montreal (Geography of Montreal), and is affected by the same ecological conditions, namely, it is a large open plain of wide plateaus and marshland. The West Island is surrounded by the other islands in the Hochelaga Archipelago as well as Lake of Two Mountains and Lac Saint-Louis and their inter-connected rivers and creeks. The territory was largely agricultural from the 17th century into the mid-20th, when it was then quickly developed into a sprawling network of bedroom suburbs. The West Island has numerous large tracts of uncultivated land, some of which are protected parks while in other cases they're merely the fallow fields of former farms, waiting to be sold to residential property developers. Other portions of land have been designated for the construction of a highway to connect the 40 with the 440, through Kirkland, Pierrefonds, Ile Bizard and Laval, but the plan has gone nowhere. A significant portion of the Northwestern corner of the West Island is so sparsely developed it constitutes the last portion of Montreal's pre-settlement ecosystem. Though agriculture on the island is limited to the Macdonald Experimental Farm, the remnants of farmland in Senneville and Pierrefonds are likely to be developed into low-density residential housing. Conserving the remaining segments of local island wilderness has become a focal point of West Island politics over the course of the last thirty years, and is point of common concern. Flora & Fauna Due to the primarily residential character of the West Island and the influence of the City Beautiful and Garden City (Garden city movement) movements in residential urban-planning in older suburbs on island, the West Island is primarily composed of single-family dwellings on spacious lots organized along small winding roads leading away from large thoroughfares. The area is notable for its many parks and a general emphasis on retaining as much of the rustic, rural charm that characterized the region and led to its development as a popular summer retreat in the early part of the 20th century Due to these and other traits, a wide variety of flora and fauna common to the Saint Lawrence river valley can be found in a somewhat balanced natural ecosystem in the largely undeveloped Northwestern corner of the West Island, in addition to the developed low-density residential areas. Flora and fauna found in the West Island fall within the broader spectrum of the Eastern Great Lakes lowland forests ecoregion. Of note is the presence of non-native, borderline hardiness trees, such as the Tulip Tree (Liriodendron), which thrive in small section of Senneville near the Île aux Tourtes Bridge. Among others, mammal species that inhabit the greater West Island region include White-tailed deer, Coyote and Cottontail rabbits. the current population of White-Tailed Deer is quite substantial, It is estimated that there is over a thousand individuals in the deer population. It is not uncommon for Moose to occasionally cross the ice onto the island in Winter. Other species endemic to the western portion of the island include grey squirrels, red squirrels, flying squirrels, mink, chipmunks, racoons, beaver, skunks, porcupines, martens, woodchucks, muskrat, otters, and fox. The number of bird species varies according to season and migration. During spring and fall many species pass through the area on their way to southern breeding grounds. During winter months, depending on climatic conditions and availability of food in the northern Quebec, many species of birds will take up temporary residence, such as Great Grey Owls, Snow Buntings, Snowy owls,and others. The West Island has enough variation in suitable habitats, such as marsh, ponds, forest and field that many species of birds nest here. Various species of reptiles which can be found include Garter Snakes, Red Bellied, Brown, Milk and the Northern Water Snake. Species of turtles include Painted, Map and Snapping turtle. Amphibians include Bullfrogs, Green frogs, leopard frogs, Spring peepers, Wood frogs, and others. Salamanders such as the Eastern Newt, Red backed Salamander, Blue Spotted Salamander are also found in the more humid habitats. In the surrounding waters of the west island, notably the Lake St. Louis side, large fish species such as Northern Pike, Sturgeon, Garfish, Carp, Catfish, Muskellunge can be found. Given the Saint Lawrence's heavy traffic and years of mis-use, the ecoregion is negatively effected by high pollution which in turn has resulted in diminished local populations of native fauna. That said, residential development in the greater West Island suburban region (including the Vaudreuil-Soulanges (Vaudreuil-Soulanges Regional County Municipality) area and parts of Eastern Ontario), has resulted in occasional sightings of black bears (American black bear), wolves (Eastern Wolf), lynx (Canada lynx) and cougars (Eastern Cougar) (which are generally believed to be extinct though sightings and some physical evidence suggest otherwise) as they themselves are pushed out of their habitats. Gallery of West Island Fauna Image:EasternScreechOwl-Rufous.jpg Eastern Screech Owl Image:Wtdfishwild.jpg White-tailed Deer Image:Lepus americanus 5459.JPG Snowshoe Hare Image:Brautentenpaar 2008-03-21 072.jpg Wood Duck Image:Beaver in Winter, Gatineau Park.jpg Canadian Beaver Image:Groundhog3.jpg Groundhog Image:Cardinalis cardinalis -Columbus, Ohio, USA-male-8 (1).jpg Northern Cardinal Image:River Otter-27527.jpg North American River Otter Image:Canada lynx by Michael Zahra.jpg Canada Lynx Image:Porcupine-BioDome.jpg North American Porcupine Image:Raccoon (Procyon lotor) 1.jpg North American Racoon Image:Falco peregrinus -Nova Scotia, Canada -eating-8.jpg Peregrine Falcon Image:EasternBoxTurtleMale.jpg Eastern Box Turtle Image:Red Fox (Vulpes vulpes) -British Wildlife Centre-8.jpg Red Fox Image:Tyto alba close up.jpg Barn Owl Image:Notophthalmus viridescensPCCA20040816-3983A.jpg Eastern Newt Image:Turkey Vulture, Ottawa.jpg Turkey Vulture Gallery of West Island Flora Image:Acer saccharum.jpg Sugar Maple Image:Img ulmus americana 2209.jpg American Elm Image:Quehanna Birches.jpg Canoe Birch Image:Tsuga canadensis morton.jpg Eastern Hemlock Image:Pinus resinosa.jpg Red Pine Nature Parks The Morgan Arboretum in Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, 610 acres of protected urban forest with over 180 bird species, of which about one-hundred breed within the park. It is also the home to the Ecomuseum Zoo, which features a collection of species native to the Saint Lawrence River valley. Cap Saint Jacques (Cap-Saint-Jacques Nature Park), Montreal's largest park at 711 acres of protected forest, it features of 30 km of cross-country trails, a beach and a small organic farm. There are also the L'Anse-à-l'Orme Nature Park, Angell Woods, Terra Cotta Park, Centennial Park, the Rapides du Cheval Blanc linear park, and the Bois-de-Liesse Nature Park which constitute the major forested areas of the West Island, while remaining community green spaces are typically designed in a conventional park layout. The other principle large open green spaces include Macdonald Experimental Farm and the remaining tracts of open land around the Morgan Arboretum in Senneville and western Pierrefonds. Municipalities and boroughs The West Island consists of the following towns, cities and boroughs: *Baie-D'Urfé – a primarily residential town of 3,900 people notable for a more rural charm, established in 1910. *Beaconsfield (Beaconsfield, Quebec) – a small residential city of 19,000 people well-served by public transit The '''North Shore Lions''' football (Canadian football) organization is currently a member of the QBFL (Quebec Bantam Football League) operating in the West Island of Montreal, Canada. This storied park was founded by Bill Allan in 1967 when the local teams were struggling to find talented kids to play football. Since 1967 this park has taken part in 35+ provincial title games and won 30 of those provincial games. World War II prosperity kept unemployment low. Machine politics, fiscal conservatism and a program of rural electrification consolidated the dominance of the Union Nationale over the province. The government of Maurice Duplessis adopted the current flag of Quebec to replace the Union Jack. It won a landslide victory in the 1948 election (Quebec general election, 1948), leaving the Liberals with only a handful of seats. Until the 1952 election (Quebec general election, 1952), the Liberal delegation to the Legislative Assembly (Legislative Assembly of Quebec) consisted of only a handful of members who came almost entirely from Montreal's West Island. It was not until 1953 that their leader could win a seat in the institution. Conrad Black, Duplessis, ISBN 0-7710-1530-5, McClelland & Stewart, Toronto, 1977.


experimental

: ftp2.cits.rncan.gc.ca pub geott ess_pubs 107 107783 gscmap-a_148a_e_1916_mn01.pdf Island of Montreal, Quebec, Canada, 1916, Stansfield, J *From www.collectionscanada.gc.ca Gordon and Gotch map of Montreal dated 1924. *Experimental Farms Service Canada Department of Agriculture, 1952. Titled "Soil Map of Montreal-Jesus-Bizard Islands" Early 21st century: Merger

of the West Island is so sparsely developed it constitutes the last portion of Montreal's pre-settlement ecosystem. Though agriculture on the island is limited to the Macdonald Experimental Farm, the remnants of farmland in Senneville and Pierrefonds are likely to be developed into low-density residential housing. Conserving the remaining segments of local island wilderness has become a focal point of West Island politics over the course of the last thirty years, and is point of common concern

-l'Orme Nature Park , Angell Woods, Terra Cotta Park, Centennial Park, the Rapides du Cheval Blanc linear park, and the Bois-de-Liesse Nature Park which constitute the major forested areas of the West Island, while remaining community green spaces are typically designed in a conventional park layout. The other principle large open green spaces include Macdonald Experimental Farm and the remaining tracts of open land around the Morgan Arboretum in Senneville and western Pierrefonds


community+green

-l'Orme Nature Park , Angell Woods, Terra Cotta Park, Centennial Park, the Rapides du Cheval Blanc linear park, and the Bois-de-Liesse Nature Park which constitute the major forested areas of the West Island, while remaining community green spaces are typically designed in a conventional park layout. The other principle large open green spaces include Macdonald Experimental Farm and the remaining tracts of open land around the Morgan Arboretum in Senneville and western Pierrefonds. Municipalities and boroughs The West Island consists of the following towns, cities and boroughs: *Baie-D'Urfé – a primarily residential town of 3,900 people notable for a more rural charm, established in 1910. *Beaconsfield (Beaconsfield, Quebec) – a small residential city of 19,000 people well-served by public transit The '''North Shore Lions''' football (Canadian football) organization is currently a member of the QBFL (Quebec Bantam Football League) operating in the West Island of Montreal, Canada. This storied park was founded by Bill Allan in 1967 when the local teams were struggling to find talented kids to play football. Since 1967 this park has taken part in 35+ provincial title games and won 30 of those provincial games. World War II prosperity kept unemployment low. Machine politics, fiscal conservatism and a program of rural electrification consolidated the dominance of the Union Nationale over the province. The government of Maurice Duplessis adopted the current flag of Quebec to replace the Union Jack. It won a landslide victory in the 1948 election (Quebec general election, 1948), leaving the Liberals with only a handful of seats. Until the 1952 election (Quebec general election, 1952), the Liberal delegation to the Legislative Assembly (Legislative Assembly of Quebec) consisted of only a handful of members who came almost entirely from Montreal's West Island. It was not until 1953 that their leader could win a seat in the institution. Conrad Black, Duplessis, ISBN 0-7710-1530-5, McClelland & Stewart, Toronto, 1977.


community sports

, it is an architecturally significant school given its open concept design along an axial core, not to mention industrial visual cues, such as exposed concrete walls and overhead pipes, small windows and rooms without doors. Roughly 1200 students attend PCHS, which is co-located with the LBPSB administered West Island Career Centre (WICC). PCHS offers an international baccalaureate program and shares its grounds with the George Springate community sports complex. Riverdale High School (Pierrefonds, Quebec


large green

for the significant Francophone cultural influence in what was arguably the 'most English' part of Québec. The West Island has a multicultural feel and an at times eclectic design (with modern buildings and classic Québécois country homes side by side), given the history of the area and its complex inter-related development with the City of Montreal. The region boasts large green spaces bordering rivers and lakes, bike trails, nature parks, museums, cross-country ski trails, ecological farms, golf courses


concept design

, it is an architecturally significant school given its open concept design along an axial core, not to mention industrial visual cues, such as exposed concrete walls and overhead pipes, small windows and rooms without doors. Roughly 1200 students attend PCHS, which is co-located with the LBPSB administered West Island Career Centre (WICC). PCHS offers an international baccalaureate program and shares its grounds with the George Springate community sports complex. Riverdale High School (Riverdale High School (Pierrefonds, Quebec)) – once one of the largest schools in the West Island (approximately 2,600 students in the early-1970s until the early 1980s), Riverdale's population has declined significantly in the last thirty years, but its still remains a special place in the community of Pierrefonds. An adult education centre now occupies most of the first floor. Saint Thomas High School (St. Thomas High School (Quebec)) – one of the finest public high schools in the West Island, St. Thomas is consistently ranked in the top-ten of Quebec's schools The '''North Shore Lions''' football (Canadian football) organization is currently a member of the QBFL (Quebec Bantam Football League) operating in the West Island of Montreal, Canada. This storied park was founded by Bill Allan in 1967 when the local teams were struggling to find talented kids to play football. Since 1967 this park has taken part in 35+ provincial title games and won 30 of those provincial games. World War II prosperity kept unemployment low. Machine politics, fiscal conservatism and a program of rural electrification consolidated the dominance of the Union Nationale over the province. The government of Maurice Duplessis adopted the current flag of Quebec to replace the Union Jack. It won a landslide victory in the 1948 election (Quebec general election, 1948), leaving the Liberals with only a handful of seats. Until the 1952 election (Quebec general election, 1952), the Liberal delegation to the Legislative Assembly (Legislative Assembly of Quebec) consisted of only a handful of members who came almost entirely from Montreal's West Island. It was not until 1953 that their leader could win a seat in the institution. Conrad Black, Duplessis, ISBN 0-7710-1530-5, McClelland & Stewart, Toronto, 1977.


eclectic design

for the significant Francophone cultural influence in what was arguably the 'most English' part of Québec. The West Island has a multicultural feel and an at times eclectic design (with modern buildings and classic Québécois country homes side by side), given the history of the area and its complex inter-related development with the City of Montreal. The region boasts large green spaces bordering rivers and lakes, bike trails, nature parks, museums, cross-country ski trails, ecological farms, golf courses


cultural influence

for the significant Francophone cultural influence in what was arguably the 'most English' part of Québec. The West Island has a multicultural feel and an at times eclectic design (with modern buildings and classic Québécois country homes side by side), given the history of the area and its complex inter-related development with the City of Montreal. The region boasts large green spaces bordering rivers and lakes, bike trails, nature parks, museums, cross-country ski trails, ecological farms, golf courses


community cultural

the most division and provincial titles in Quebec Midget Football League (QMFL) history. Points of Interest '''Fritz Farm''', a community cultural centre in Baie-D'Urfé located at 20477 Chemin Lakeshore on a large common green bordering picturesque Lac Saint-Louis (Lake Saint-Louis). Fritz Farm is one of several examples of preserved heritage homes dating back to the 18th century that can be found in Baie-D'Urfé, which are a direct link to the West Island's colonial era. '''Église Sainte-Geneviève (Église Sainte-Geneviève (Montreal))''', a parish church established in 1741 by Antoine Faucon and completed in its present form in 1844. It is located at the intersection of Rue St-Louis and Gouin Boulevard West in the village of Sainte-Geneviève and is part of a larger complex that includes a presbytery and cemetery and a municipal park along the banks of the scenic Rivière des Prairies. '''Saint-Joachim de Pointe-Claire Church & Pointe-Claire Village''', another parish church established in the mid-18th century, though completed only in 1885 in a Gothic-revival style, designed by noted local church architect Victor Bourgeau (:fr:Victor Bourgeau). It is located at 2 Ste-Anne Street in Pointe Claire Village. Permanent settlement in this part of the West Island dates back at least as far as 1710, when the emblematic Pointe-Claire Windmill was completed. The Village features many 19th century and early 20th century buildings and forms an important local small-business sector. There are many restaurants and boutiques in the area, in addition to the exclusive Beaconsfield Golf Club and the Pointe-Claire Curling Club. Othe sites of interest include the '''Pointe-Claire Windmill''' & Summer Retreat of the Congregation Notre Dame. '''Centennial Hall''', in Beaconsfield – a community cultural centre and small-scale performance venue. '''Stewart Hall''', in Pointe-Claire – an art gallery and community cultural centre and small-scale performance venue. '''The Museum of Local History and Heritage''' located at 1850 Lakeshore Drive and adjacent to the large linear parks that stretch from Dorval along the edge of Lac Saint-Louis east towards Old Lachine Village where the old public beaches used to be. There are several marinas in the area and each summer the lake is filled with diverse pleasure craft. Wind-surfing here is quite popular, though public bathing is illegal and generally discouraged. Fishing is popular, though again, it is unwise to consume anything caught. The '''Morgan Arboretum''' and '''Ecomuseum Zoo''', a zoo dedicated to animal species endemic to the Eastern Great Lakes lowland forest, located in one of the last old growth example of the type on-island. The Ecomuseum is, along with Montréal's Biodome and Insectarium, one of the key local public zoological institutions that have found innovative solutions to the problems with 'traditional zoos'. '''Old Saint-Anne's Village and the Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue Canal''', another area in the West Island where permanent settlement dates back to the mid-late 17th century, Sainte-Anne's became a focal point for local services with the development of Macdonald College and the Veterans Hospital during the early 20th century. The Village has many restaurants and bars and other services supporting the comparatively large student population. The area features a boardwalk, the old Rex Theatre and numerous specialty shops. Other features include the Gallipeault Bridge which connects Sainte-Anne's to Ile Perot. The '''Canadian Aviation Heritage Centre''' and the Macdonald Experimental Farm, co-located at McGill's Macdonald Campus in Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue. '''Fort Senneville''', originally built in 1671 and destroyed and re-built twice, the Fort was captured and destroyed by Benedict Arnold in 1776 during manœuvres associated with the Battle of The Cedars during the American War of Independence. A commemorative plaque located along Chemin Senneville by the Lake of Two Mountains records the location of the battle associated with the fall of the Fort. All that remains today is part of the windmill which doubled as a watch-tower and the foundations of the seigneurial house, if not some portions of the walls. The site is on private property though the proprietor has been known to allow visitors if they ask politely. '''Cap-Saint-Jacques Nature Park''' – the largest nature park on the island also features the only remaining public beach and an organic farm. '''Rapides du Cheval Blanc''' Listed as one of the ten Eco-territories of Montreal The Ten Eco-territories The park has a view of the Whitehorse rapids and a wooded area. Parc Nature Des Rapides du Cheval Blanc '''Bois-de-Liesse Nature Park''', the second largest nature park on-island and home to some protected heritage properties. See also *Lac-Saint-Louis (electoral district) *Pierrefonds—Dollard (electoral district) *Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine *Saint-Laurent—Cartierville *LaSalle—Émard * Boroughs of Montreal (Boroughs of Montreal#List of Montreal boroughs) * List of former boroughs of Montreal (Boroughs of Montreal#List of former boroughs) * Districts of Montreal * Municipal reorganization in Quebec References The '''North Shore Lions''' football (Canadian football) organization is currently a member of the QBFL (Quebec Bantam Football League) operating in the West Island of Montreal, Canada. This storied park was founded by Bill Allan in 1967 when the local teams were struggling to find talented kids to play football. Since 1967 this park has taken part in 35+ provincial title games and won 30 of those provincial games. World War II prosperity kept unemployment low. Machine politics, fiscal conservatism and a program of rural electrification consolidated the dominance of the Union Nationale over the province. The government of Maurice Duplessis adopted the current flag of Quebec to replace the Union Jack. It won a landslide victory in the 1948 election (Quebec general election, 1948), leaving the Liberals with only a handful of seats. Until the 1952 election (Quebec general election, 1952), the Liberal delegation to the Legislative Assembly (Legislative Assembly of Quebec) consisted of only a handful of members who came almost entirely from Montreal's West Island. It was not until 1953 that their leader could win a seat in the institution. Conrad Black, Duplessis, ISBN 0-7710-1530-5, McClelland & Stewart, Toronto, 1977.


play football

? West Island, Cocos (Keeling) Islands - The '''North Shore Lions''' football (Canadian football) organization is currently a member of the QBFL (Quebec Bantam Football League) operating in the West Island of Montreal, Canada. This storied park was founded by Bill Allan in 1967 when the local teams were struggling to find talented kids to play football. Since 1967 this park has taken part in 35+ provincial title games and won 30 of those

West Island

name West Island settlement_type official_name image_skyline Baie dUrfe QC 2.jpg image_caption Baie-D'Urfé, on the shores of Lake Saint Louis. image_flag imagesize image_shield nickname motto image_map mapsize map_caption image_dot_map dot_mapsize dot_map_caption dot_x dot_y image_map1 map_caption1 mapsize1 200px coordinates_region CA-QC subdivision_type Country subdivision_type1 Province (Provinces and territories of Canada) subdivision_type2 Urban agglomeration (Urban agglomeration (Quebec)) subdivision_name subdivision_name1 subdivision_name2 Montreal leader_title leader_name leader_title1 leader_name1 leader_title2 leader_name2 established_title established_date established_title2 established_date2 area_footnotes area_magnitude 1 E8 area_total_km2 150.11 area_total_sq_mi area_land_km2 area_land_sq_mi area_water_km2 area_water_sq_mi area_water_percent area_urban_km2 area_urban_sq_mi area_metro_km2 area_metro_sq_mi population_as_of 2006 (Canada 2006 Census) population_footnotes population_note population_total 224669 population_density_km2 1496.7 population_density_sq_mi population_metro population_density_metro_km2 population_density_metro_sq_mi population_urban population_blank1_title population_blank1 population_blank2_title population_blank2 timezone Eastern (North American Eastern Time Zone) (EST) utc_offset -5 timezone_DST EDT utc_offset_DST -4 latd 45 latm 27 lats 00 latNS N longd 73 longm 45 longs 00 longEW W elevation_footnotes elevation_m elevation_ft elevation_max_m elevation_max_ft elevation_min_m elevation_min_ft postal_code_type Postal code span postal_code H8Y to H9X (List of H Postal Codes of Canada) area_code (514) and (438) (Area code 514 438) website footnotes '''The West Island''' (in French, ''l'Ouest de l'île'') is the unofficial name given to the cities, towns and boroughs at the western end of the Island of Montreal, in Quebec, Canada. It is generally considered to consist of the cities of Dorval, Pointe-Claire, Kirkland (Kirkland, Quebec), Dollard-des-Ormeaux, Beaconsfield (Beaconsfield, Quebec), Baie-D'Urfé (Baie-D'Urfé, Quebec), Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue (Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec), the village of Senneville (Senneville, Quebec), and two boroughs of the city of Montreal: Pierrefonds-Roxboro and L'Île-Bizard–Sainte-Geneviève. Furthermore, given the nature of suburban demographic development in Montréal, off-island suburbs towards the west of the island (such as Vaudreuil, Pincourt or Hudson) in addition to outer-ring boroughs of Montréal (such as LaSalle, Lachine and St-Laurent) are often considered part of the West Island. This is in large part due to similarities in personal income, design of the communities, services available (and shared), quality of life and economic engines supporting the population.

Historically, there was a linguistic division of the island of Montreal into French and English 'halves', with Francophones typically inhabiting the eastern portion of the island and Anglophones typically inhabiting the western half. Census shows language changes in the West Island - Commuting - The Westmount Examiner The West Island's population is approximately 234,000 and although the overwhelming majority of its residents are today bilingual if not multi-lingual, (given the cosmopolitan nature of this vast suburban area), anglophones (English-speaking Quebecer) still make up a relative majority of the West Island's population. Given its population, the West Island is of similar same size as Windsor, Kitchener, Longueuil, Saskatoon, Burnaby or Regina. Curiously, as late as the 1960s, the West Island was principally farmland populated by Old World French Canadians, which in turn accounts for the significant Francophone cultural influence in what was arguably the 'most English' part of Québec.

The West Island has a multicultural feel and an at times eclectic design (with modern buildings and classic Québécois country homes side by side), given the history of the area and its complex inter-related development with the City of Montreal. The region boasts large green spaces bordering rivers and lakes, bike trails, nature parks, museums, cross-country ski trails, ecological farms, golf courses and cultural sites. As a testimony to its 300-year-old history, residents and visitors alike will discover 18th-century buildings along the former Chemin du Roy, today Gouin Boulevard and Chemin du Bord-du-Lac, in addition to the remnants of Fort Senneville. The shores of Lake Saint-Louis offer a unique setting with café-terrasses, restaurants and boutiques filled with quaint old world charm. The area today is largely middle and upper-middle class residential zoning along with the strip-malls and other services one might expect in a North American mega-suburb. Large tracts were developed in the period 1955–1975 (such as Dollard-des-Ormeaux, Pierrefonds, Roxboro and Kirkland) where the majority of homes are similarly-sized variations of the basic bungalow design, though with traditional Québécois architectural influences. Lots tend to be more or less even in size without much variation across entire cities or boroughs. As such, the West Island tends to give the impression of being a somewhat homogeneous construction.

The region is home to the Montréal Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport (Montréal-Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport) (formerly Montreal-Dorval), John Abbott College, Cégep Gérald-Godin, the Macdonald Campus of McGill University, the Fairview Pointe-Claire and Galeries des Sources malls, as well as Montreal's largest park, the Cap-Saint-Jacques Nature Park. Hospitals include the Veteran's Hospital in Sainte-Anne's and the Lakeshore General Hospital in Pointe-Claire. Municipalities range in character from the modern bedroom communities of Kirkland (Kirkland, Quebec) or Dollard-des-Ormeaux to the former cottage-country homes of Dorval, Pointe Claire and Beaconsfield (Beaconsfield, Quebec), with Senneville and Pierrefonds (Pierrefonds-Roxboro), though sharing a common border, demonstrating the extremes in West Island population density. Other communities, like Roxboro (Roxboro, Quebec), Ste-Genevieve or Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue (Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec) have their own particular characters, the latter two sporting the region's two public colleges. Development and the concentration of industrial activity along highways 20, 40 and 15 over the last twenty years has made securing the region's remaining tracts of open land a priority for many West Island residents. Indeed, the West Island is home to one of the last large remaining tracts of Montreal-region wilderness on island.

Search by keywords:


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017