Waiouru

What is Waiouru known for?


main training

of the available resources were directed instead to maintaining the New Zealand infantry battalion in the Malaysia-Singapore area. The battalion was committed to the Far East Strategic Reserve. The battalion, designated 1st Battalion RNZIR (Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment) by that time, was brought home in 1989. In 1978 a national museum for the army, the QEII Army Memorial Museum, was built at Waiouru, the army's main training base in the central North Island. Medal His Victoria Cross was displayed at the QEII Army Memorial Museum at Waiouru, New Zealand. On Sunday 2 December 2007 it was one of nine Victoria Crosses that were among a hundred medals stolen from the museum. On 16 February 2008 New Zealand Police announced all the medals had been recovered as a result of a NZ$ (New Zealand dollar)300,000 reward offered by Michael Ashcroft (Michael Ashcroft, Baron Ashcroft) and Tom Sturgess. Stolen War Medals Recovered They entered the competition in 2002 alongside the Taranaki Wildcats (Taranaki rugby league team#2002-2003: Bartercard Cup). They had a close relationship with the New Zealand Army and its base at Waiouru. In 2006 two New Zealand Warriors were assigned to the club; Micheal Luck & Steve Price (Steve Price (rugby league)).


huge

, at the southern end of Lake Taupo. Waiouru is a military town that has grown up in conjunction with the New Zealand Army Camp (Waiouru Army Camp) and the Training Group (ATG), which is responsible for the training of recruits and other soldiers. The Desert Road immediately north of Waiouru runs through the 870 km² army training area, which lies mainly to the east of the road. The Royal NZ Navy's Irirangi (HMNZS Irirangi) communications station with its huge antennae

plains had been used to gather wild-fowl by all the surrounding land-owners, Ngati Rangi (Karioi Whanganui river) Te Ati Hau Tuwharetoa (Taumarunui Lake Taupo) and Ngati Whiti (Moawhango). The boundaries had already been sorted out back in 1850 at a huge hui chaired by Wanganui missionary Richard Taylor, with most of the Murimotu land being allotted to various hapu of Ngati Rangi, but no money was at stake back then, and in the intervening 20 years the Hauhau Titokowaru Te Kooti wars had been

Main Trunk Railway railway arrived in 1907, but by then not much wool was being sent out, as overgrazing by sheep had led to a plague of rabbits. By the 1930s no sheep at all could be grazed on the Waiouru sheep station. In 1939 most of the leasehold Waiouru sheep station land was taken by the Government for the Army Camp. About 1904, Alfred Peters set up a Post Office, store and an accommodation house for travelers at Waiouru and for the 500 men who were digging the huge railway cuttings


power line

was acquired for training, and for upgrading of the State Highway and constructing a high-voltage power line up the Moawhango valley. The base expanded for compulsory National Service and for SAS training. At its peak in the 1970s, Waiouru had a population of 6000 people, including 600+ school aged children. NZ Army Brief 1987 In the 1980s, some army units were transferred to Linton (Linton Army Camp), and by 1990 Waiouru’s permanent population had fallen to about 3000. In 2005, Waiouru’s population dropped to about 2000 with the transfer out of armoured force personnel, and continues to drop as operations are shifted to nearby Linton Camp and Ohakea. But the Army expects a number of courses to continue to be run at Waiouru. Waiouru Airfield The Royal New Zealand Air Force uses the sealed Waiouru Airfield (ICAO code NZRU) to the west of the camp for practice landings of Hercules transport aircraft, and Jameson Field inside the camp for helicopters. HMNZS Irirangi On 16 February 2008 New Zealand Police announced all the medals had been recovered as a result of a NZ$ (New Zealand dollar)300,000 reward offered by Michael Ashcroft (Michael Ashcroft, Baron Ashcroft) and Tom Sturgess. Stolen War Medals Recovered They entered the competition in 2002 alongside the Taranaki Wildcats (Taranaki rugby league team#2002-2003: Bartercard Cup). They had a close relationship with the New Zealand Army and its base at Waiouru. In 2006 two New Zealand Warriors were assigned to the club; Micheal Luck & Steve Price (Steve Price (rugby league)).


time national

Waiouru in New Zealand. This resulted in the deaths of two full-time national servicemen, Third Sergeant Ronnie Tan Han Chong and Lance Corporal Low Yin Tit. 12 other servicemen were injured in the incident, including a Staff Sergeant from New Zealand Army, who was acting as the New Zealand Defence Force liaison officer observer to the visiting SAF battalion. Bushcraft Most units conduct classroom training in bushcraft and survival skills, and hold regular


summer training

at Waiouru in 2014. Waiouru Army Camp On 16 February 2008 New Zealand Police announced all the medals had been recovered as a result of a NZ$ (New Zealand dollar)300,000 reward offered by Michael Ashcroft (Michael Ashcroft, Baron Ashcroft) and Tom Sturgess. Stolen War Medals Recovered They entered the competition in 2002 alongside the Taranaki Wildcats (Taranaki rugby league team#2002-2003: Bartercard Cup). They had a close relationship with the New Zealand Army and its base at Waiouru. In 2006 two New Zealand Warriors were assigned to the club; Micheal Luck & Steve Price (Steve Price (rugby league)).


large training

at Waiouru in 2014. Waiouru Army Camp From 1936 to 1938, Territorial artillery batteries camped under canvas at Waiouru for their summer training exercises. In 1939, a month after war was declared, most of the leasehold Waiouru run was taken back by the Crown. By December 1940 a large training camp had been built, and 340 km² of land acquired for training. Croom 1941 From 1949 another 250 km² of land to the north and east


training

, at the southern end of Lake Taupo. Waiouru is a military town that has grown up in conjunction with the New Zealand Army Camp (Waiouru Army Camp) and the Training Group (ATG), which is responsible for the training of recruits and other soldiers. The Desert Road immediately north of Waiouru runs through the 870 km² army training area, which lies mainly to the east of the road. The Royal NZ Navy's Irirangi (HMNZS Irirangi) communications station with its huge antennae

at Waiouru in 2014. Waiouru Army Camp From 1936 to 1938, Territorial artillery batteries camped under canvas at Waiouru for their summer training exercises. In 1939, a month after war was declared, most of the leasehold Waiouru run was taken back by the Crown. By December 1940 a large training camp had been built, and 340 km² of land acquired for training. Croom 1941 From 1949 another 250 km² of land to the north and east

was acquired for training, and for upgrading of the State Highway and constructing a high-voltage power line up the Moawhango valley. The base expanded for compulsory National Service and for SAS training. At its peak in the 1970s, Waiouru had a population of 6000 people, including 600+ school aged children. NZ Army Brief 1987 In the 1980s, some army units were transferred to Linton (Linton Army Camp), and by 1990 Waiouru’s permanent population had fallen to about 3000


national service

was acquired for training, and for upgrading of the State Highway and constructing a high-voltage power line up the Moawhango valley. The base expanded for compulsory National Service and for SAS training. At its peak in the 1970s, Waiouru had a population of 6000 people, including 600+ school aged children. NZ Army Brief 1987 In the 1980s, some army units were transferred to Linton (Linton Army Camp), and by 1990 Waiouru’s permanent population had fallen to about 3000. In 2005, Waiouru’s population dropped to about 2000 with the transfer out of armoured force personnel, and continues to drop as operations are shifted to nearby Linton Camp and Ohakea. But the Army expects a number of courses to continue to be run at Waiouru. Waiouru Airfield The Royal New Zealand Air Force uses the sealed Waiouru Airfield (ICAO code NZRU) to the west of the camp for practice landings of Hercules transport aircraft, and Jameson Field inside the camp for helicopters. HMNZS Irirangi On 16 February 2008 New Zealand Police announced all the medals had been recovered as a result of a NZ$ (New Zealand dollar)300,000 reward offered by Michael Ashcroft (Michael Ashcroft, Baron Ashcroft) and Tom Sturgess. Stolen War Medals Recovered They entered the competition in 2002 alongside the Taranaki Wildcats (Taranaki rugby league team#2002-2003: Bartercard Cup). They had a close relationship with the New Zealand Army and its base at Waiouru. In 2006 two New Zealand Warriors were assigned to the club; Micheal Luck & Steve Price (Steve Price (rugby league)).


family business

. It also operated Beaver (de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver)s, Ceres (CAC Ceres), Cessna 180 185 (Cessna 185)s, Piper PA-25 Pawnees, Piper Cub (Piper J-3)s and Cessna AGwagons (Cessna 188), but eventually standardised on Fletchers for its fixed-wing fleet, purchasing eight PAC Crescos when these were introduced. In 2004 the family business was bought out by Ravensdown Fertiliser Cooperative, although two of Wally’s grandsons remain in the company: Bruce, chief pilot, and Rick


Mclean

. Between 1858 and 1875, Major George Gwavas Carlyon imported Exmoor ponies (Exmoor Pony) to Hawkes Bay and crossed them with local stock to produce the Carlyon pony. These Carlyon ponies were later crossed with two Welsh stallions, Kinarth Caesar and Comet, imported by Sir Donald McLean (Donald McLean (New Zealand politician)), and a breed known as the Comet resulted. At some point during the 1870s, McLean released a Comet stallion and several mares on the Kaingaroa Plains and the bloodline

Waiouru

right thumb 350px Waiouru Army Museum (File:NZ-Waiouru-Museum2.jpg) right thumb 350px Overlander (train) The Overlander (File:EF30163+Overlander NearWaiouru 22March2003 JChristianson.jpg), hauled by EF 30163 (New Zealand EF class locomotive) near Waiouru

'''Waiouru''' is a small town in the centre of the North Island of New Zealand. It is on the North Island Volcanic Plateau, 25 kilometres south-east of Mount Ruapehu, and in the Ruapehu District.

The main attraction of Waiouru is the Queen Elizabeth II Army Memorial Museum (QEII Army Memorial Museum), opened in 1978, which features static displays of New Zealand's military heritage. The rest of the township consists of a small cluster of a police station, two garages, a petrol station postal agency, a panel beater, two motels, a tavern and half a dozen cafe restaurants spread along the highway. There are three unmanned diesel refueling sites for the 700+ big freight trucks that pass through Waiouru each day. Nearby are the yards of a roading contractor and a maintenance contractor. A grocery store, hairdresser and beautician are in the Army housing area two kilometres away, and a medical centre, public library, cafe and department store are inside the army camp.

North of Waiouru is the section of State Highway 1 (State Highway 1 (New Zealand)) called the ''Desert Road''. This runs for 35 km through the Rangipo Desert to Turangi, at the southern end of Lake Taupo. Waiouru is a military town that has grown up in conjunction with the New Zealand Army Camp (Waiouru Army Camp) and the Training Group (ATG), which is responsible for the training of recruits and other soldiers. The Desert Road immediately north of Waiouru runs through the 870 km² army training area, which lies mainly to the east of the road. The Royal NZ Navy's Irirangi (HMNZS Irirangi) communications station with its huge antennae is 2 km north of Waiouru.

Waiouru is on the North Island Main Trunk Railway, which came through in 1907. Waiouru Railway Station is the highest station (814 m) on the New Zealand rail system (Rail transport in New Zealand). The Overlander (Overlander (train)) no longer (from April 2005) stops at Waiouru.

Seven kilometres to the west of Waiouru is the small settlement of Tangiwai, the site of New Zealand's worst railway disaster (Tangiwai disaster). On 24 December 1953 the overnight express from Wellington to Auckland passed over Tangiwai railway bridge just after it had been weakened by a lahar from Mount Ruapehu. The bridge collapsed, sending the train into the Whangaehu River, killing 151 people. Many army and naval personnel were involved in the rescue of survivors and the recovery of bodies. Sister Mortimer of the Waiouru Camp Hospital, "The Angel of Tangiwai", worked non-stop for three days tending the survivors and laying out the bodies. Gregory 2003

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