Venetian Dalmatia

What is Venetian Dalmatia known for?


early+contemporary

was one of the centers of Italian Renaissance, when the Republic of Venice dominated Dalmatia, and the Venetian Damatia enjoyed the benefits of this fact. From Giorgio Orsini to the influence on the early contemporary croatian literature, Venice made its Dalmatia the most western-oriented civilized area of the Balkans, mostly in the cities. It is noteworthy the fact that Catholicism in Dalmatia was strongly defended by the Republic of Venice, and that the Ottomans never occupied most


fine+public

, Darko Novaković (2000). Leksikon hrvatskih pisaca. Zagreb: Školska knjiga d.d. ISBN 953-0-61107-2. In 1997 the historical city-island of Trogir (called "Tragurium" in Latin when was one of the Dalmatian City-States and "Trau" in venetian) was inscribed in the UNESCO World Heritage List. "The orthogonal street plan of this island...was embellished by successive rulers with many fine public and domestic buildings and fortifications. Its beautiful


jewelers

of decadence - which virtually concludes the history of Dalmatian art - set in during the latter half of the 17th century. Special mention must be made of the carved woodwork, embroideries and plate preserved in many churches. The silver statuette and the reliquary of St. Biagio at Ragusa, and the silver ark of St. Simeon at Zara, are fine specimens of Italian jewelers' work, ranging in date from the 11th or 12th to the 17th century ...". In the 19th century


+architectural+works

of Venetian Dalmatia: this region is the only in Croatia where did not happen the destructions (and the population mass-emigrations) due to the Ottoman conquests (Siege of Vienna) Some architectural works from that period of Dalmatia are of European importance, and would contribute to further development of the Renaissance: the Cathedral of St James in Sebenico (Šibenik) and the Chapel of Blessed John in Trau (Trogir). Indeed the Croatian renaissance, strongly influenced by Venetian and Italian literature, was thoroughly developed on the coastal parts of Croatia. The beginning of the Croatian (Culture of Croatia) 16th-century literal activity was marked by a Dalmatian humanist (Humanism) Marco Marulo (Marko Marulić) and his epic (Epic poetry) book ''Judita'', which has been written by incorporating peculiar motives and events from the classical Bible, and adapting them to the contemporary literature in Europe. Dunja Fališevac, Krešimir Nemec, Darko Novaković (2000). Leksikon hrvatskih pisaca. Zagreb: Školska knjiga d.d. ISBN 953-0-61107-2. In 1997 the historical city-island of Trogir (called "Tragurium" in Latin when was one of the Dalmatian City-States and "Trau" in venetian) was inscribed in the UNESCO World Heritage List. "The orthogonal street plan of this island...was embellished by successive rulers with many fine public and domestic buildings and fortifications. Its beautiful Romanesque (Romanesque architecture) churches are complemented by the outstanding Renaissance and Baroque buildings from the Venetian period", says the UNESCO report. Trogir is the best-preserved Romanesque-Gothic (Gothic architecture) complex not only in the Adriatic, but in all of Central Europe. Trogir's medieval core, surrounded by walls, comprises a venetian well-preserved castle and tower (Kamerlengo Castle) and a series of dwellings and palaces from the Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque periods. Trogir's grandest building is the church of St. Lawrence, whose main west portal is a masterpiece by Radovan (Radovan (master)), and the most significant work of the Romanesque-Gothic style in Croatia. The British Encyclopedia 1911 British Encyclopedia, p.774 states that: "... from Italy (and Venice) came the Romanesque. The belfry of S. Maria, at Zara, erected in 1105, is first in a long list of Romanesque buildings. At Arbe there is a beautiful Romanesque campanile which also belongs to the 12th century; but the finest example in this style is the cathedral of Trau. The 14th century Dominican and Franciscan convents in Ragusa are also noteworthy. Romanesque lingered on in Dalmatia until it was displaced by Venetian Gothic in the early years of the 15th century. The influence of Venice was then at its height. Even in the relatively hostile Republic of Ragusa the Romanesque of the custom-house and Rectors' palace is combined with Venetian Gothic, while the graceful balconies and ogee windows of the Prijeki closely follow their Venetian models. In 1441 Giorgio Orsini of Zara, summoned from Venice to design the cathedral of Sebenico, brought with him the influence of the Italian Renaissance. The new forms which he introduced were eagerly imitated and developed by other architects, until the period of decadence - which virtually concludes the history of Dalmatian art - set in during the latter half of the 17th century. Special mention must be made of the carved woodwork, embroideries and plate preserved in many churches. The silver statuette and the reliquary of St. Biagio at Ragusa, and the silver ark of St. Simeon at Zara, are fine specimens of Italian jewelers' work, ranging in date from the 11th or 12th to the 17th century ...". In the 19th century the cultural influence from Venice & the Italian peninsula (Italy) originated the editing in Zara of the first Dalmatian newspaper, in Italian (Italian language) and Croatian (Croatian language): ''Il Regio Dalmata – Kraglski Dalmatin'', founded and published by the Italian Bartolomeo Benincasa in 1806 AD. Furthermore, this ''Kraglski Dalmatin'' was stamped in the typography of Antonio Luigi Battara and was the first fully done in Croatian language. Governors The ''Provveditore generale'' (Governor-general) was the official name of Venetian state officials supervising Dalmatia. Category:History of Dalmatia Category:Venetian period in the history of Croatia Category:16th century in Croatia Category:17th century in Croatia Category:18th century in Croatia Category:History of Italy


century+special

of decadence - which virtually concludes the history of Dalmatian art - set in during the latter half of the 17th century. Special mention must be made of the carved woodwork, embroideries and plate preserved in many churches. The silver statuette and the reliquary of St. Biagio at Ragusa, and the silver ark of St. Simeon at Zara, are fine specimens of Italian jewelers' work, ranging in date from the 11th or 12th to the 17th century ...". In the 19th century


774

the Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque periods. Trogir's grandest building is the church of St. Lawrence, whose main west portal is a masterpiece by Radovan (Radovan (master)), and the most significant work of the Romanesque-Gothic style in Croatia. The British Encyclopedia 774 mode 2up 1911 British Encyclopedia, p.774 states that: "... from Italy (and Venice) came the Romanesque


century amp

of decadence - which virtually concludes the history of Dalmatian art - set in during the latter half of the 17th century. Special mention must be made of the carved woodwork, embroideries and plate preserved in many churches. The silver statuette and the reliquary of St. Biagio at Ragusa, and the silver ark of St. Simeon at Zara, are fine specimens of Italian jewelers' work, ranging in date from the 11th or 12th to the 17th century ...". In the 19th century


cultural influence

the cultural influence from Venice & the Italian peninsula (Italy) originated the editing in Zara of the first Dalmatian newspaper, in Italian (Italian language) and Croatian (Croatian language): ''Il Regio Dalmata – Kraglski Dalmatin'', founded and published by the Italian Bartolomeo Benincasa in 1806 AD. Furthermore, this ''Kraglski Dalmatin'' was stamped in the typography of Antonio Luigi Battara and was the first fully done in Croatian language. Governors


characters place


years military

. 148" Setton (1991), p. 148 while a month-long siege of the fortress of Šibenik by the Ottomans in August and September failed. Setton (1991), p. 149 During the next few years, military operations stalled because of an outbreak of famine and plague amongst the Venetians at Zadar, while both sides focused their resources in the Aegean area. As other fronts took priority for the Ottomans

Venetian Dalmatia

'''Venetian Dalmatia''' ( ) refers to the periods when parts of Dalmatia were under the rule of the Republic of Venice, mainly from the 16th to the 18th centuries. Map of Venetian Dalmatia in 1750, with the 21 provinces called "Reggimenti" The first possessions started around 1000 AD, but Venetian Dalmatia was fully consolidated from 1420 AD and lasted until 1797 AD when the Venice's republic disappeared with the Napoleon conquest.

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