Veliky Novgorod

What is Veliky Novgorod known for?


vast power

power in Lithuania. The legal basis for Polish–Lithuanian relations was revisited by the Union of Vilnius and Radom of 1401, which reiterated ''de facto'' Lithuanian independence and ''de jure'' Polish supremacy. Vytautas was to be known by the title of Grand Duke (''magnus dux'') and enjoyed vast power in Lithuania, while technically he was subordinate to Jogaila, 'Greatest Duke' (''supremus dux'') and King of Poland. The union


famous bronze

to represent original features of Russian architecture (austere stone walls, five helmet-like domes). Its frescoes were painted in the 12th century originally on the orders of Bishop Nikita (died 1108) (the "porches" or side chapels were painted in 1144 under Archbishop Nifont (Nifont of Novgorod)) and renovated several times over the centuries, most recently in the nineteenth century. Tsarevskaia, 14, 19-22, 24, 29, 35. The cathedral features famous bronze gates


covers history

of inhabited localities in Russia cities in Russia ''The Archaeology of Novgorod,'' by Valentin L. Yanin, in ''Ancient Cities, Special Issue,'' (Scientific American), pp. 120–127, c. 1994. Covers, History, Kremlin of Novgorod, Novgorod Museum of History, preservation dynamics of the soils, and the production of Birch bark documents. and serves as the administrative center of Novgorod Oblast. It is situated on the M10 federal highway (Russian Route M10) connecting Moscow and St. Petersburg (Saint Petersburg). The city lies along the Volkhov River just downstream from its outflow from Lake Ilmen. UNESCO recognised Novgorod as a World Heritage Site (UNESCO World Heritage Site) in 1992. Population: 0.86 - 50px (File:1000 Sergy Rad.jpg) Sergius of Radonezh, spiritual leader 50px (File:1000 Filaret.jpg) Filaret (Patriarch Filaret (Feodor Romanov)), Patriarch of Moscow 50px (File:1000 Marfa.jpg) Marfa Boretskaya, Posadnik of Novgorod (Veliky Novgorod) 50px (File:1000 Pushkin.jpg) Alexander Pushkin, poet and writer -


influence made

Rus' In 882, Rurik's successor, Oleg of Novgorod, conquered Kiev and founded the state of Kievan Rus'. Novgorod's size as well as its political, economic, and cultural influence made it the second most important city in Kievan Rus'. According to a custom, the elder son and heir of the ruling Kievan monarch was sent to rule Novgorod even as a minor. When the ruling monarch had no such son, Novgorod was governed by posadniks, such as the legendary Gostomysl, Dobrynya, Konstantin (Konstantin Dobrynich), and Ostromir. Of all their princes, Novgorodians most cherished the memory of Yaroslav the Wise (Yaroslav I the Wise), who sat as Prince of Novgorod from 1010 to 1019, while his father, Vladimir the Great, was a prince in Kiev. Yaroslav promulgated the first written code of laws (later incorporated into Russkaya Pravda) among the Eastern Slavs and is said to have granted the city a number of freedoms or privileges, which they often referred to in later centuries as precedents in their relations with other princes. His son, Vladimir (Vladimir of Novgorod), sponsored construction of the great St. Sophia Cathedral (Saint Sophia Cathedral in Novgorod), more accurately translated as the Cathedral of Holy Wisdom, which stands to this day. Early foreign ties In Norse sagas the city is mentioned as the capital 0.86 - 50px (File:1000 Sergy Rad.jpg) Sergius of Radonezh, spiritual leader 50px (File:1000 Filaret.jpg) Filaret (Patriarch Filaret (Feodor Romanov)), Patriarch of Moscow 50px (File:1000 Marfa.jpg) Marfa Boretskaya, Posadnik of Novgorod (Veliky Novgorod) 50px (File:1000 Pushkin.jpg) Alexander Pushkin, poet and writer -


important roles

0.86 - 50px (File:1000 Sergy Rad.jpg) Sergius of Radonezh, spiritual leader 50px (File:1000 Filaret.jpg) Filaret (Patriarch Filaret (Feodor Romanov)), Patriarch of Moscow 50px (File:1000 Marfa.jpg) Marfa Boretskaya, Posadnik of Novgorod (Veliky Novgorod) 50px (File:1000 Pushkin.jpg) Alexander Pushkin, poet and writer -


attempt made

of his principality, the Volga (Volga River) (''Mordvin'' "Rav" or "Rava"), and the Oka (Oka River), and Obran Osh was renamed Nizhny Novgorod. Its name literally means ''Lower Newtown,'' to distinguish it from the older Veliky Novgorod. Its independent existence was threatened by the continuous Mordvin attacks against it. The major attempt made by Inäzor Purgaz from Arzamas in January 1229 was repulsed, but after the death of Yuri II on March 4, 1238


previous period

), to St. Simeon (1462), and other saints. Generally, they are not thought to be as innovative as the churches from the previous period. Several shrines from the 12th century (i.e., in Opoki) were demolished brick by brick and then reconstructed exactly as they used to be, several of them in the mid-fifteenth century, again under Archbishop Yevfimy II (Euthymius II), perhaps one of the greatest patrons of architecture in medieval Novgorod. Novgorod's conquest by Ivan III


publication

Veliky Novgorod City Portal *Veliky Novgorod for tourists *The Faceted Palace of the Kremlin in Novgorod the Great site *Veliky Novgorod's architecture and buildings history *

Travels_into_Poland_Russia_Sweden_and_Denmark. author William Coxe authorlink William Coxe (historian) publication-date 1784 oclc 654136 chapterurl http: archive.org stream travelspolandrus01coxe#page 444 mode 2up chapter Novogorod *

chapterurl http: www.archive.org stream cu31924028397929#page n159 mode 2up chapter Novgorod the Great *


major attempt

of his principality, the Volga (Volga River) (''Mordvin'' "Rav" or "Rava"), and the Oka (Oka River), and Obran Osh was renamed Nizhny Novgorod. Its name literally means ''Lower Newtown,'' to distinguish it from the older Veliky Novgorod. Its independent existence was threatened by the continuous Mordvin attacks against it. The major attempt made by Inäzor Purgaz from Arzamas in January 1229 was repulsed, but after the death of Yuri II on March 4, 1238 at the Battle of Sit River the Mongols occupied the fortress and the remnants of small Nizhny Novgorod settlement which surrendered without any resistance in order to preserve what had been developed since Purgaz's attack nine years earlier. Later a major stronghold for border protection, Nizhny Novgorod fortress took advantage of a natural moat formed by the two rivers. thumb right A map of the White Sea (1635) (File:Whiteseamap.jpg) The sea was known to the Novgorod people (Veliky Novgorod) since at least the 11th century and was rapidly explored because of its commercial significance for navigation and coastal forests rich in fur animals. One of the earliest settlements near the sea shores was established in the late 14th century in Kholmogory, on the Northern Dvina River. From there, in 1492, a merchant fleet laden with grain and carrying ambassadors of Ivan III of Russia sailed to Denmark, marking the establishment of the first international seaport in Russia. The Conservatoire Rachmaninoff in Paris, as well as streets in Veliky Novgorod (which is close to his birthplace) and Tambov, are named after the composer. In 1986, Moscow Conservatory dedicated a concert hall on its premises to Rachmaninoff, designating the 252-seat auditorium Rachmaninoff Hall. A monument to Rachmaninoff was unveiled in Veliky Novgorod, near his birthplace, as recently as 14 June 2009. 0.86 - 50px (File:1000 Sergy Rad.jpg) Sergius of Radonezh, spiritual leader 50px (File:1000 Filaret.jpg) Filaret (Patriarch Filaret (Feodor Romanov)), Patriarch of Moscow 50px (File:1000 Marfa.jpg) Marfa Boretskaya, Posadnik of Novgorod (Veliky Novgorod) 50px (File:1000 Pushkin.jpg) Alexander Pushkin, poet and writer -


cultural landscape

, Kostroma and others) have at best preserved the architecture and the spirit of ancient and medieval Rus' (Rus' people), and also are among the main tourist destinations. Many old fortifications (List of castles in Russia) (typically Kremlins), monasteries (List of Russian Orthodox monasteries) and churches (Russian Orthodox Church) are scattered throughout Russia, forming its unique cultural landscape both in big cities and in remote areas. - Veliky Novgorod Великий Новгород Novgorod Oblast - * 0.86 - 50px (File:1000 Sergy Rad.jpg) Sergius of Radonezh, spiritual leader 50px (File:1000 Filaret.jpg) Filaret (Patriarch Filaret (Feodor Romanov)), Patriarch of Moscow 50px (File:1000 Marfa.jpg) Marfa Boretskaya, Posadnik of Novgorod (Veliky Novgorod) 50px (File:1000 Pushkin.jpg) Alexander Pushkin, poet and writer -

Veliky Novgorod

WHS Historic Monuments of Novgorod and Surroundings Image 200px The medieval walls of Novgorod (pictured) withstood many sieges (File:Natalya dulchenko kokui.jpg) State Party Russian Federation (Russia) Type Cultural Criteria ii, iv, vi ID 604 Region European Russia (List of World Heritage Sites in Europe) Year 1992 Session 16th Link http: whc.unesco.org en list 604 '''Veliky Novgorod''' (also '''Novgorod the Great''') (

At its peak during the 14th century, it was one of Europe's largest cities.

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