Veliky Novgorod

What is Veliky Novgorod known for?


important historic

The medieval walls of Novgorod (pictured) withstood many sieges State Party Russian Federation (Russia) Type Cultural Criteria ii, iv, vi ID 604 Region European Russia (List of World Heritage Sites in Europe) Year 1992 Session 16th Link http: whc.unesco.org en list 604 '''Veliky Novgorod''' (also '''Novgorod the Great''') ( 0.86 - 50px (File:1000 Sergy Rad.jpg) Sergius of Radonezh, spiritual leader 50px (File:1000 Filaret.jpg) Filaret (Patriarch Filaret (Feodor Romanov)), Patriarch of Moscow 50px (File:1000 Marfa.jpg) Marfa Boretskaya, Posadnik of Novgorod (Veliky Novgorod) 50px (File:1000 Pushkin.jpg) Alexander Pushkin, poet and writer -


site+population

administrative center is the city (types of inhabited localities in Russia) of Veliky Novgorod. Some of the oldest Russian cities, including Veliky Novgorod and Staraya Russa, are located there. The historic monuments of Veliky Novgorod are surroundings have been declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Population: 634,111 (2010 Census (Russian Census (2010))). The oblast is administratively divided


location original

... publisher Bennett & Walton year 1827 location Original from the New York Public Library url http: books.google.com books?id NrsBAAAAYAAJ&pg PA837&dq %22Valdai+Lake%22&client firefox-a page 837 0.86 - 50px (File:1000 Sergy Rad.jpg) Sergius of Radonezh, spiritual leader 50px (File:1000 Filaret.jpg) Filaret (Patriarch Filaret (Feodor Romanov)), Patriarch of Moscow 50px (File:1000 Marfa.jpg) Marfa Boretskaya, Posadnik of Novgorod (Veliky Novgorod) 50px (File:1000 Pushkin.jpg) Alexander Pushkin, poet and writer -


studies publication

Travels_into_Poland_Russia_Sweden_and_Denmark. author William Coxe authorlink William Coxe (historian) publication-date 1784 oclc 654136 chapterurl http: archive.org stream travelspolandrus01coxe#page 444 mode 2up chapter Novogorod *


played important

can be drawn up, the city-state's exact political constitution remains unknown. The boyars and the archbishop ruled the city together, although where one official's power ended and another's began is uncertain. The prince, although his power was reduced from around the middle of the 12th century, was represented by his ''namestnik'', or lieutenant, and still played important roles as a military commander, legislator and jurist. The exact composition of the Veche, too, is uncertain, with some historians, such as Vasily Klyuchevsky, claiming it was democratic in nature, while later scholars, such as Marxists (Marxist historiography) Valentin Ianin and Aleksandr Khoroshev, see it as a "sham democracy" controlled by the ruling elite. In the 13th century, Novgorod, while not a member of the Hanseatic League, was the easternmost kontor, or entrepot, of the league, being the source of enormous quantities of luxury (sable, ermine, fox, marmot) and non-luxury furs (squirrel pelts). Janet Martin, ''Treasure of the Land of Darkness: the Fur Trade and its Significance for Medieval Russia''. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985). Throughout the Middle Ages, the city thrived culturally. A large number of birch bark letters (birch bark document) have been unearthed in excavations, perhaps suggesting widespread literacy, although this is uncertain (some scholars 0.86 - 50px (File:1000 Sergy Rad.jpg) Sergius of Radonezh, spiritual leader 50px (File:1000 Filaret.jpg) Filaret (Patriarch Filaret (Feodor Romanov)), Patriarch of Moscow 50px (File:1000 Marfa.jpg) Marfa Boretskaya, Posadnik of Novgorod (Veliky Novgorod) 50px (File:1000 Pushkin.jpg) Alexander Pushkin, poet and writer -


vast power

power in Lithuania. The legal basis for Polish–Lithuanian relations was revisited by the Union of Vilnius and Radom of 1401, which reiterated ''de facto'' Lithuanian independence and ''de jure'' Polish supremacy. Vytautas was to be known by the title of Grand Duke (''magnus dux'') and enjoyed vast power in Lithuania, while technically he was subordinate to Jogaila, 'Greatest Duke' (''supremus dux'') and King of Poland. The union


unique cultural

, Kostroma and others) have at best preserved the architecture and the spirit of ancient and medieval Rus' (Rus' people), and also are among the main tourist destinations. Many old fortifications (List of castles in Russia) (typically Kremlins), monasteries (List of Russian Orthodox monasteries) and churches (Russian Orthodox Church) are scattered throughout Russia, forming its unique cultural landscape both in big cities and in remote areas. - Veliky Novgorod Великий Новгород

monasteries monasteries and churches (Russian Orthodox Church) are scattered throughout Russia, forming its unique cultural landscape both in big cities and in remote areas. thumb 250px Cathedral of St. Sophia from the southeast (Image:Saint Sophia Cathedral in Novgorod.jpg) '''The Cathedral of St. Sophia''' (the Holy Wisdom of God (Holy Wisdom)) in the Kremlin (Novgorod Kremlin) (or Detinets) in Veliky Novgorod is the cathedral church of the Archbishop of Novgorod


architecture+large

of Russia Ivan III in 1478 decisively changed the character of local architecture. Large commissions were thenceforth executed by Muscovite masters and patterned after cathedrals of Moscow Kremlin: e.g., the Savior Cathedral of Khutyn Monastery (1515), the Cathedral of the Mother of God of the Sign (1688), the St. Nicholas Cathedral of Vyaschizhy Monastery (1685). Nevertheless, the styles of some parochial churches were still in keeping with local traditions: e.g., the churches


history studies

: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History'' 8, no. 2 (Spring 2007): 231-270. Archbishops were elected by the Veche or by the drawing of lots, and after their election, were sent to the metropolitan (Metropolitan bishop) for consecration. Michael C. Paul, "Episcopal Election in Novgorod, Russia 1156-1478". ''Church History: Studies in Christianity and Culture'' 72, No. 2 (June 2003): 251-275. While a basic outline of the various officials and the Veche


major cultural

Russian (Russians) and Muslim Tatar (Tatars) cultures. The city has rigistered a brand ''The Third Capital of Russia'', though a number of other major Russian cities compete for this status, like Samara (Samara, Russia), Novosibirsk, Yekaterinburg and Nizhny Novgorod, all being major cultural centers with rich history and prominent architecture. Veliky Novgorod, Pskov, Dmitrov and the cities of Golden Ring (Vladimir (Vladimir (city)), Yaroslavl, Kostroma and others) have at best preserved the architecture and the spirit of ancient and medieval Rus' (Rus' people), and also are among the main tourist destinations. Many old fortifications (List of castles in Russia) (typically Kremlins), monasteries (List of Russian Orthodox monasteries) and churches (Russian Orthodox Church) are scattered throughout Russia, forming its unique cultural landscape both in big cities and in remote areas. - Veliky Novgorod Великий Новгород Novgorod Oblast - * 0.86 - 50px (File:1000 Sergy Rad.jpg) Sergius of Radonezh, spiritual leader 50px (File:1000 Filaret.jpg) Filaret (Patriarch Filaret (Feodor Romanov)), Patriarch of Moscow 50px (File:1000 Marfa.jpg) Marfa Boretskaya, Posadnik of Novgorod (Veliky Novgorod) 50px (File:1000 Pushkin.jpg) Alexander Pushkin, poet and writer -

Veliky Novgorod

WHS Historic Monuments of Novgorod and Surroundings Image 200px The medieval walls of Novgorod (pictured) withstood many sieges (File:Natalya dulchenko kokui.jpg) State Party Russian Federation (Russia) Type Cultural Criteria ii, iv, vi ID 604 Region European Russia (List of World Heritage Sites in Europe) Year 1992 Session 16th Link http: whc.unesco.org en list 604 '''Veliky Novgorod''' (also '''Novgorod the Great''') (

At its peak during the 14th century, it was one of Europe's largest cities.

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