Tyre, Lebanon

What is Tyre, Lebanon known for?


story part

'' ''Annales'', 1908. p.253. meaning ''New City'' (Aramaic: קרתא חדאתא, ''Qarta Ḥdatha''), implying it was a 'new Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon)' Carthage: new excavations in Mediterranean capital ) is a major urban centre that has existed for nearly 3,000 years on the Gulf of Tunis, developing from a Phoenician colony of the 1st millennium BC. It is currently a suburb of Tunis, Tunisia, with a population of 20,715 (2004 Census). thumb Carthage (File:Ruines de Carthage.jpg) According to Roman sources, Phoenician colonists from modern-day Lebanon, led by Queen Dido (Elissa) founded Carthage. Queen Elissa (Dido (Queen of Carthage)) (also known as "Alissar"), was an exiled princess of the ancient Phoenician city of Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon). At its peak, the metropolis she founded, Carthage, came to be called the "shining city," ruling 300 other cities around the western Mediterranean and leading the Phoenician (or Punic) world. Jerusalem and the Davidic Covenant David conquers the Jebusite fortress of Jerusalem, and makes it his capital, and "Hiram (King Hiram I) king of Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon) sent messengers to David, and cedar trees, also carpenters and masons who built David a house." David brings the Ark of the Covenant to Jerusalem, intending to build a temple, but God, speaking to the prophet Nathan (Nathan (Prophet)),is pleased, saying the temple will be built. God makes a covenant with David, promising that he will establish the house of David : "Your throne shall be established forever." Following Tughtakin's death in 1128, his son, Taj al-Din Buri, became the nominal ruler of Damascus. Coincidentally, the Seljuq prince of Mosul, Imad al-Din Zengi (Zengi), took power in Aleppo and gained a mandate from the Abbasids to extend his authority to Damascus. In 1129, around 6,000


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the Phoenicians whom he affiliated to the ancient patriarchate of Antioch. Paul also preached in Lebanon, he had lingered with the early Christians in Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon) and Sidon.

the possibility that Saint Peter himself was the one who evangelized (Evangelism) the Phoenicians whom he affiliated to the ancient patriarchate of Antioch. Paul also preached in Lebanon, he had lingered with the early Christians in Tyre, Lebanon Tyre


nature international

Protecting-marine-biodiversity-in-Lebanon publisher International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) (International Union for Conservation of Nature) date 2 May 2012 For this reason, early Christian baptistries (Baptismal font) and tombs typically were shaped as octagons. The practice of octaves was first introduced under Constantine I, when the dedication festivities of the basilicas at Jerusalem and Tyre, Lebanon were observed for eight days. After these one-off occasions, annual liturgical feasts began to be dignified with an octave. The first such feasts were Easter, Pentecost, and, in the East, Epiphany (Epiphany (holiday)). This occurred in the fourth century and served as a period of time for the newly baptized to take a joyful retreat. "Octave", ''Catholic Encyclopedia'' Margaritus first appears as a leader of the fleet alongside Tancred, then just count of Lecce, which took Cephalonia and the Ionian Islands in 1185 and then harassed Isaac Comnenus (Isaac Comnenus of Cyprus)' Cyprus and captured many of his ships, taking them back to Sicily. In Autumn 1187, King William sent him with a fleet to the Holy Land, where, on 2 October, Saladin had captured Jerusalem (Siege of Jerusalem (1187)). Margaritus, with 60 ships and 200 knights, patrolled the Palestine coast constantly, preventing Saladin from taking any of the vital seaports of the Latin crusader kingdom (Kingdom of Jerusalem). In July 1188, he arrived at Tripoli (Tripoli, Lebanon) and forced Saladin to raise the siege of Krak des Chevaliers. Something similar happened at Marqab, Latakia, and Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon) in the following year. On 11 November 1189, William died and his fleet returned. On 4 October 1190, Margaritus, the ''strategos'' Jordan du Pin, and many other nobles of Messina were forced to flee when Richard the Lion-Hearted, king of England, sacked the city and burnt it. Margaritus took little part thereafter in the Third Crusade. *It is metal well known in ancient times. It is the general opinion that the Phoenicians (w:Phoenicians) of Tyre (w:Tyre, Lebanon) and Sidon (w:Sidon) obtained their supplies of tin from the British Isles (w:British Isles). In Ezek (w:Book of Ezekiel) (27:12_ it is said to have been brought from Tarshish (w:Tarshish), which was probably a commercial emporium supplied with commodities from other places. In Isa (w:Book of Isaiah) (1:25) the word so rendered is generally understood of lead (w:Pead), the alloy with which the silver had become mixed. The fire of the Babylonish Captivity (w:Babylonish Captivity) would be the means of purging out the idolatrous (w:Idolatrous) alloy that had corrupted the people. **In Bible Dictionary quoted in Dictionary in: "tin".


range including

, when he was succeeded by his brother Amalric (Amalric II of Jerusalem). The exact region referred to as "Blessed Land" in the Qur'an verse 21:71 has been interpreted differently by various scholars: Abdullah Yusuf Ali likens it to a wide land range including, Syria, Palestine and the cities of Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon) and Sidon; Az-Zujaj describes it as, ''"Damascus, Palestine, and a bit of Jordan"''; Qatada claims it to be, ''"the Levant


quot story

-eyed-lady-lowlands Sad-Eyed Lady of the Lowlands , Blonde on Blonde, 1966. * Hiram Abiff, a central figure in the mythology and symbolism of Freemasonry, is said to have hailed from Tyre. * Poul Anderson's (Poul Anderson) "Ivory, and Apes, and Peacocks" story, part of the Time Patrol series (Poul Anderson#Time Patrol), is set in ancient Tyre during the time of King Hiram I. File:TyreAlMinaCollonnadedStreet.jpg Main colonnaded street at ''Al Mina'' excavation site File:TyreAlMinaAgora.jpg ''Al Mina'' excavation area – supposed Roman agora File:TyreNarrowStChrQrt.jpg A typical narrow street in the Christian quarter File:TyreFishingHarbourOldTown.jpg Tyre harbor International relations For this reason, early Christian baptistries (Baptismal font) and tombs typically were shaped as octagons. The practice of octaves was first introduced under Constantine I, when the dedication festivities of the basilicas at Jerusalem and Tyre, Lebanon were observed for eight days. After these one-off occasions, annual liturgical feasts began to be dignified with an octave. The first such feasts were Easter, Pentecost, and, in the East, Epiphany (Epiphany (holiday)). This occurred in the fourth century and served as a period of time for the newly baptized to take a joyful retreat. "Octave", ''Catholic Encyclopedia'' Margaritus first appears as a leader of the fleet alongside Tancred, then just count of Lecce, which took Cephalonia and the Ionian Islands in 1185 and then harassed Isaac Comnenus (Isaac Comnenus of Cyprus)' Cyprus and captured many of his ships, taking them back to Sicily. In Autumn 1187, King William sent him with a fleet to the Holy Land, where, on 2 October, Saladin had captured Jerusalem (Siege of Jerusalem (1187)). Margaritus, with 60 ships and 200 knights, patrolled the Palestine coast constantly, preventing Saladin from taking any of the vital seaports of the Latin crusader kingdom (Kingdom of Jerusalem). In July 1188, he arrived at Tripoli (Tripoli, Lebanon) and forced Saladin to raise the siege of Krak des Chevaliers. Something similar happened at Marqab, Latakia, and Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon) in the following year. On 11 November 1189, William died and his fleet returned. On 4 October 1190, Margaritus, the ''strategos'' Jordan du Pin, and many other nobles of Messina were forced to flee when Richard the Lion-Hearted, king of England, sacked the city and burnt it. Margaritus took little part thereafter in the Third Crusade. *It is metal well known in ancient times. It is the general opinion that the Phoenicians (w:Phoenicians) of Tyre (w:Tyre, Lebanon) and Sidon (w:Sidon) obtained their supplies of tin from the British Isles (w:British Isles). In Ezek (w:Book of Ezekiel) (27:12_ it is said to have been brought from Tarshish (w:Tarshish), which was probably a commercial emporium supplied with commodities from other places. In Isa (w:Book of Isaiah) (1:25) the word so rendered is generally understood of lead (w:Pead), the alloy with which the silver had become mixed. The fire of the Babylonish Captivity (w:Babylonish Captivity) would be the means of purging out the idolatrous (w:Idolatrous) alloy that had corrupted the people. **In Bible Dictionary quoted in Dictionary in: "tin".


Tripoli lebanon

and several aquilae (Aquila (Roman)) as he retreated to Antioch. With the Imperial forces routed, Pacorus and Labienus occupied the whole of Palestine and Anatolia, with the exception of a few cities that held out, including Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon). In Judea, Pacorus deputy Barzapharnes deposed king Hyrcanus II and appointed his nephew Antigonus king in his place. In Lebanon: Zahleh, Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon), Tripoli (Tripoli, Lebanon), Sidon, Jounieh Sarba

not quite come up to the Nicene standard. Basil had afterwards a disputation with the Anomoean (Anomoeanism) Aëtius (Aëtius of Antioch). Located some For this reason, early Christian baptistries (Baptismal font) and tombs typically were shaped as octagons. The practice of octaves was first introduced under Constantine I, when the dedication festivities of the basilicas at Jerusalem and Tyre, Lebanon were observed for eight days. After these one-off occasions, annual liturgical feasts began to be dignified with an octave. The first such feasts were Easter, Pentecost, and, in the East, Epiphany (Epiphany (holiday)). This occurred in the fourth century and served as a period of time for the newly baptized to take a joyful retreat. "Octave", ''Catholic Encyclopedia'' Margaritus first appears as a leader of the fleet alongside Tancred, then just count of Lecce, which took Cephalonia and the Ionian Islands in 1185 and then harassed Isaac Comnenus (Isaac Comnenus of Cyprus)' Cyprus and captured many of his ships, taking them back to Sicily. In Autumn 1187, King William sent him with a fleet to the Holy Land, where, on 2 October, Saladin had captured Jerusalem (Siege of Jerusalem (1187)). Margaritus, with 60 ships and 200 knights, patrolled the Palestine coast constantly, preventing Saladin from taking any of the vital seaports of the Latin crusader kingdom (Kingdom of Jerusalem). In July 1188, he arrived at Tripoli (Tripoli, Lebanon) and forced Saladin to raise the siege of Krak des Chevaliers. Something similar happened at Marqab, Latakia, and Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon) in the following year. On 11 November 1189, William died and his fleet returned. On 4 October 1190, Margaritus, the ''strategos'' Jordan du Pin, and many other nobles of Messina were forced to flee when Richard the Lion-Hearted, king of England, sacked the city and burnt it. Margaritus took little part thereafter in the Third Crusade. *It is metal well known in ancient times. It is the general opinion that the Phoenicians (w:Phoenicians) of Tyre (w:Tyre, Lebanon) and Sidon (w:Sidon) obtained their supplies of tin from the British Isles (w:British Isles). In Ezek (w:Book of Ezekiel) (27:12_ it is said to have been brought from Tarshish (w:Tarshish), which was probably a commercial emporium supplied with commodities from other places. In Isa (w:Book of Isaiah) (1:25) the word so rendered is generally understood of lead (w:Pead), the alloy with which the silver had become mixed. The fire of the Babylonish Captivity (w:Babylonish Captivity) would be the means of purging out the idolatrous (w:Idolatrous) alloy that had corrupted the people. **In Bible Dictionary quoted in Dictionary in: "tin".


strong commercial

the island against Antigonos. Ptolemy lost Cyprus to Demetrios Poliorketes in 306 and 294 BC, but after that it remained under Ptolemaic (Ptolemaic dynasty) rule till 58 BC. It was ruled by a governor from Egypt and sometimes formed a minor Ptolemaic kingdom during the power-struggles of the 2nd and 1st centuries. Strong commercial relationships with Athens and Alexandria, two of the most important commercial centres of antiquity, developed. Carthage Carthage was founded in 814 BC (810s BC) by Phoenician settlers from the city of Tyre (Tyre (Lebanon)), bringing with them the city-god (tutelary deity) Melqart. As recounted by Timaeus, FrGrH 566, fr. 60. Archaeological attestation for so early a date is still wanting, though recent discoveries in situ may point nearly as far back in time. Ancient Carthage was an informal hegemony of Phoenician city-states throughout North Africa and modern Spain from 575 BC until 146 BC. It was more or less under the control of the city-state of Carthage after the fall of Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon) to Babylonian forces. At the height of the city's influence, its empire included most of the western Mediterranean. The empire was in a constant state of struggle with the Roman Republic, which led to a series of conflicts known as the Punic Wars. After the third and final Punic War (Third Punic War), Carthage was destroyed then occupied by Roman forces. Nearly all of the territory held by Carthage fell into Roman hands. Antiquity Acre is one of the oldest continuously inhabited sites (List of cities by time of continuous habitation) in the region. For this reason, early Christian baptistries (Baptismal font) and tombs typically were shaped as octagons. The practice of octaves was first introduced under Constantine I, when the dedication festivities of the basilicas at Jerusalem and Tyre, Lebanon were observed for eight days. After these one-off occasions, annual liturgical feasts began to be dignified with an octave. The first such feasts were Easter, Pentecost, and, in the East, Epiphany (Epiphany (holiday)). This occurred in the fourth century and served as a period of time for the newly baptized to take a joyful retreat. "Octave", ''Catholic Encyclopedia'' Margaritus first appears as a leader of the fleet alongside Tancred, then just count of Lecce, which took Cephalonia and the Ionian Islands in 1185 and then harassed Isaac Comnenus (Isaac Comnenus of Cyprus)' Cyprus and captured many of his ships, taking them back to Sicily. In Autumn 1187, King William sent him with a fleet to the Holy Land, where, on 2 October, Saladin had captured Jerusalem (Siege of Jerusalem (1187)). Margaritus, with 60 ships and 200 knights, patrolled the Palestine coast constantly, preventing Saladin from taking any of the vital seaports of the Latin crusader kingdom (Kingdom of Jerusalem). In July 1188, he arrived at Tripoli (Tripoli, Lebanon) and forced Saladin to raise the siege of Krak des Chevaliers. Something similar happened at Marqab, Latakia, and Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon) in the following year. On 11 November 1189, William died and his fleet returned. On 4 October 1190, Margaritus, the ''strategos'' Jordan du Pin, and many other nobles of Messina were forced to flee when Richard the Lion-Hearted, king of England, sacked the city and burnt it. Margaritus took little part thereafter in the Third Crusade. *It is metal well known in ancient times. It is the general opinion that the Phoenicians (w:Phoenicians) of Tyre (w:Tyre, Lebanon) and Sidon (w:Sidon) obtained their supplies of tin from the British Isles (w:British Isles). In Ezek (w:Book of Ezekiel) (27:12_ it is said to have been brought from Tarshish (w:Tarshish), which was probably a commercial emporium supplied with commodities from other places. In Isa (w:Book of Isaiah) (1:25) the word so rendered is generally understood of lead (w:Pead), the alloy with which the silver had become mixed. The fire of the Babylonish Captivity (w:Babylonish Captivity) would be the means of purging out the idolatrous (w:Idolatrous) alloy that had corrupted the people. **In Bible Dictionary quoted in Dictionary in: "tin".


people speaking

in Phoenicia itself, arguably surviving into Augustine (Augustine of Hippo)'s time. It may have even survived the Arabic conquest of North Africa: the geographer al-Bakrī (Abū 'Ubayd 'Abd Allāh al-Bakrī) describes a people speaking a language that was not Berber (Berber languages), Latin or Coptic (Coptic language) in the city of Sirte in northern Libya, a region where spoken Punic survived well past written use.


traditional view

-sovereign local entity. The term '''city-state''' which originated in English (alongside the German '''Stadtstaat''') does not fully translate the Greek term. The ''poleis'' were not like other primordial ancient city-states like Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon) or Sidon, which were ruled by a king or a small oligarchy, but rather a political entity ruled by its body of citizens. The traditional view of archaeologists, that the appearance of urbanization at excavation sites could be read


extraordinary mix

by Greeks on an alien landscape. In Egypt, there was a native Egyptian population with its own culture, history, and traditions. The Greeks who came to Egypt, to the court or to live in Alexandria, were separated from their original cultures. Alexandria was the main Greek city of Egypt and within it there was an extraordinary mix of Greeks from many cities and backgrounds. Athanasius' first problem lay with the Meletians (Meletius of Lycopolis), who had failed to abide by the terms

Tyre, Lebanon

website '''Tyre''' (Arabic (Arabic language): south of Beirut. The name of the city means "rock (rock (geology))" (Bikai, P., "The Land of Tyre", in Joukowsky, M., ''The Heritage of Tyre'', 1992, chapter 2, p. 13) after the rocky formation on which the town was originally built. The adjective for Tyre is ''Tyrian'', and the inhabitants are ''Tyrians''.

Tyre is an ancient Phoenician city and the legendary birthplace of Europa (Europa (mythology)) and Elissa (Dido (Queen of Carthage)) (Dido). Today it is the fourth largest city in Lebanon Tyre City, Lebanon and houses one of the nation's major ports. Tourism is a major industry. The city has a number of ancient sites, including its Roman Hippodrome which was added to UNESCO's list of World Heritage Sites in 1979. Resolution 459 Lebanon's Archaeological Heritage

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