Tyre, Lebanon

What is Tyre, Lebanon known for?


place history

, with a field between, where the contests should take place. ''History of the Transmission of Ancient Books to Modern Times'' (London, 1827) and ''The Process of Historical Proof'' (London, 1828) were later remodelled as a single work (1859), in which he attempted to show grounds for accepting literary documents like the Bible as a basis for history. Next appeared an expurgated translation of Herodotus (London, 1829), work which seems to have suggested an anonymous romance, ''The Temple of Melekartha'' (London, 1831), dealing with the prehistoric migration of the Tyrians (Tyre, Lebanon) from the Persian Gulf to the Levant. Taylor is said to have depicted his wife in the heroine. His next and best-known work, ''The Natural History of Enthusiasm'' (London; Boston, 1830; 10th edit. London, 1845), appeared anonymously in May 1829. It was a sort of historico-philosophical disquisition on religious imagination, and had an instant vogue. Taylor developed the subject in his ''Fanaticism'' (London, 1833; 7th edit. 1866) and ''Spiritual Despotism'' (London, 1835, three editions). Three further volumes on scepticism, credulity, and the corruption of morals were included in the author's plan of a ‘morbid anatomy of spurious religion,’ but these complementary volumes were never completed. Those that appeared were praised by John Wilson (John Wilson (Scottish writer)) in ''Blackwood's Magazine'' and the last of the three particularly by Sir James Stephen For this reason, early Christian baptistries (Baptismal font) and tombs typically were shaped as octagons. The practice of octaves was first introduced under Constantine I, when the dedication festivities of the basilicas at Jerusalem and Tyre, Lebanon were observed for eight days. After these one-off occasions, annual liturgical feasts began to be dignified with an octave. The first such feasts were Easter, Pentecost, and, in the East, Epiphany (Epiphany (holiday)). This occurred in the fourth century and served as a period of time for the newly baptized to take a joyful retreat. "Octave", ''Catholic Encyclopedia'' Margaritus first appears as a leader of the fleet alongside Tancred, then just count of Lecce, which took Cephalonia and the Ionian Islands in 1185 and then harassed Isaac Comnenus (Isaac Comnenus of Cyprus)' Cyprus and captured many of his ships, taking them back to Sicily. In Autumn 1187, King William sent him with a fleet to the Holy Land, where, on 2 October, Saladin had captured Jerusalem (Siege of Jerusalem (1187)). Margaritus, with 60 ships and 200 knights, patrolled the Palestine coast constantly, preventing Saladin from taking any of the vital seaports of the Latin crusader kingdom (Kingdom of Jerusalem). In July 1188, he arrived at Tripoli (Tripoli, Lebanon) and forced Saladin to raise the siege of Krak des Chevaliers. Something similar happened at Marqab, Latakia, and Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon) in the following year. On 11 November 1189, William died and his fleet returned. On 4 October 1190, Margaritus, the ''strategos'' Jordan du Pin, and many other nobles of Messina were forced to flee when Richard the Lion-Hearted, king of England, sacked the city and burnt it. Margaritus took little part thereafter in the Third Crusade. *It is metal well known in ancient times. It is the general opinion that the Phoenicians (w:Phoenicians) of Tyre (w:Tyre, Lebanon) and Sidon (w:Sidon) obtained their supplies of tin from the British Isles (w:British Isles). In Ezek (w:Book of Ezekiel) (27:12_ it is said to have been brought from Tarshish (w:Tarshish), which was probably a commercial emporium supplied with commodities from other places. In Isa (w:Book of Isaiah) (1:25) the word so rendered is generally understood of lead (w:Pead), the alloy with which the silver had become mixed. The fire of the Babylonish Captivity (w:Babylonish Captivity) would be the means of purging out the idolatrous (w:Idolatrous) alloy that had corrupted the people. **In Bible Dictionary quoted in Dictionary in: "tin".


Tripoli lebanon

and several aquilae (Aquila (Roman)) as he retreated to Antioch. With the Imperial forces routed, Pacorus and Labienus occupied the whole of Palestine and Anatolia, with the exception of a few cities that held out, including Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon). In Judea, Pacorus deputy Barzapharnes deposed king Hyrcanus II and appointed his nephew Antigonus king in his place. In Lebanon: Zahleh, Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon), Tripoli (Tripoli, Lebanon), Sidon, Jounieh Sarba

not quite come up to the Nicene standard. Basil had afterwards a disputation with the Anomoean (Anomoeanism) Aëtius (Aëtius of Antioch). Located some For this reason, early Christian baptistries (Baptismal font) and tombs typically were shaped as octagons. The practice of octaves was first introduced under Constantine I, when the dedication festivities of the basilicas at Jerusalem and Tyre, Lebanon were observed for eight days. After these one-off occasions, annual liturgical feasts began to be dignified with an octave. The first such feasts were Easter, Pentecost, and, in the East, Epiphany (Epiphany (holiday)). This occurred in the fourth century and served as a period of time for the newly baptized to take a joyful retreat. "Octave", ''Catholic Encyclopedia'' Margaritus first appears as a leader of the fleet alongside Tancred, then just count of Lecce, which took Cephalonia and the Ionian Islands in 1185 and then harassed Isaac Comnenus (Isaac Comnenus of Cyprus)' Cyprus and captured many of his ships, taking them back to Sicily. In Autumn 1187, King William sent him with a fleet to the Holy Land, where, on 2 October, Saladin had captured Jerusalem (Siege of Jerusalem (1187)). Margaritus, with 60 ships and 200 knights, patrolled the Palestine coast constantly, preventing Saladin from taking any of the vital seaports of the Latin crusader kingdom (Kingdom of Jerusalem). In July 1188, he arrived at Tripoli (Tripoli, Lebanon) and forced Saladin to raise the siege of Krak des Chevaliers. Something similar happened at Marqab, Latakia, and Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon) in the following year. On 11 November 1189, William died and his fleet returned. On 4 October 1190, Margaritus, the ''strategos'' Jordan du Pin, and many other nobles of Messina were forced to flee when Richard the Lion-Hearted, king of England, sacked the city and burnt it. Margaritus took little part thereafter in the Third Crusade. *It is metal well known in ancient times. It is the general opinion that the Phoenicians (w:Phoenicians) of Tyre (w:Tyre, Lebanon) and Sidon (w:Sidon) obtained their supplies of tin from the British Isles (w:British Isles). In Ezek (w:Book of Ezekiel) (27:12_ it is said to have been brought from Tarshish (w:Tarshish), which was probably a commercial emporium supplied with commodities from other places. In Isa (w:Book of Isaiah) (1:25) the word so rendered is generally understood of lead (w:Pead), the alloy with which the silver had become mixed. The fire of the Babylonish Captivity (w:Babylonish Captivity) would be the means of purging out the idolatrous (w:Idolatrous) alloy that had corrupted the people. **In Bible Dictionary quoted in Dictionary in: "tin".


people speaking

in Phoenicia itself, arguably surviving into Augustine (Augustine of Hippo)'s time. It may have even survived the Arabic conquest of North Africa: the geographer al-Bakrī (Abū 'Ubayd 'Abd Allāh al-Bakrī) describes a people speaking a language that was not Berber (Berber languages), Latin or Coptic (Coptic language) in the city of Sirte in northern Libya, a region where spoken Punic survived well past written use.


story part

'' ''Annales'', 1908. p.253. meaning ''New City'' (Aramaic: קרתא חדאתא, ''Qarta Ḥdatha''), implying it was a 'new Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon)' Carthage: new excavations in Mediterranean capital ) is a major urban centre that has existed for nearly 3,000 years on the Gulf of Tunis, developing from a Phoenician colony of the 1st millennium BC. It is currently a suburb of Tunis, Tunisia, with a population of 20,715 (2004 Census). thumb Carthage (File:Ruines de Carthage.jpg) According to Roman sources, Phoenician colonists from modern-day Lebanon, led by Queen Dido (Elissa) founded Carthage. Queen Elissa (Dido (Queen of Carthage)) (also known as "Alissar"), was an exiled princess of the ancient Phoenician city of Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon). At its peak, the metropolis she founded, Carthage, came to be called the "shining city," ruling 300 other cities around the western Mediterranean and leading the Phoenician (or Punic) world. Jerusalem and the Davidic Covenant David conquers the Jebusite fortress of Jerusalem, and makes it his capital, and "Hiram (King Hiram I) king of Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon) sent messengers to David, and cedar trees, also carpenters and masons who built David a house." David brings the Ark of the Covenant to Jerusalem, intending to build a temple, but God, speaking to the prophet Nathan (Nathan (Prophet)),is pleased, saying the temple will be built. God makes a covenant with David, promising that he will establish the house of David : "Your throne shall be established forever." Following Tughtakin's death in 1128, his son, Taj al-Din Buri, became the nominal ruler of Damascus. Coincidentally, the Seljuq prince of Mosul, Imad al-Din Zengi (Zengi), took power in Aleppo and gained a mandate from the Abbasids to extend his authority to Damascus. In 1129, around 6,000


people made

to be a corruption of God's intention. "Den of thieves" might be a reference to extortionary pricing for the doves and money. Kilgallen 215 The people are amazed by him and his teaching, which drives the chief priests to plot to kill him. Jesus and his group however leave the city at the end of the day. According to the Midrash, a few people made themselves deities: Pharaoh Kings of Egypt (see Ezekiel 29:3: "The Nile is mine and I have made


red natural

"''; Muadh ibn Jabal as, ''"the area between al-Arish and the Euphrates"''; and Ibn Abbas as, ''"the land of Jericho"''. Ali (1991), p.934 '''Tyrian (Tyre, Lebanon) purple''' (Greek (Greek language), ), also known as '''royal purple''', '''imperial purple''' or '''imperial dye''', is a purple-red natural dye, which is extracted from sea snails, and which


quot literary

page 47 Tyre's name appears on monuments as early as 1300 BC. Philo of Byblos (in Eusebius) quotes the antiquarian authority Sanchuniathon as stating that it was first occupied by Hypsuranius. Sanchuniathon's work is said to be dedicated to "Abibalus king of Berytus"—possibly the Abibaal who was king of Tyre. Vance, Donald R. (March 1994) "Literary Sources for the History of Palestine and Syria: The Phœnician Inscriptions" ''The Biblical Archaeologist'' 57(1), pp. 2–19 There are ten Amarna letters dated 1350 BC from the mayor, Abimilku, written to Akenaten. The subject is often water, wood, and the Habiru overtaking the countryside of the mainland, and how it affected the island-city. Early history The commerce of the ancient world was gathered into the warehouses of Tyre. "Tyrian merchants were the first who ventured to navigate the Mediterranean waters; and they founded their colonies on the coasts and neighbouring islands of the Aegean Sea, in Greece, on the northern coast of Africa (Northern Africa), at Carthage and other places, in Sicily and Corsica, in Spain at Tartessus, and even beyond the pillars of Hercules at Gadeira (Cádiz)". from 'Tyre' in Easton's Bible Dictionary The city of Tyre was particularly known for the production of a rare and extraordinarily expensive sort of purple dye, produced from the murex shellfish, known as Tyrian purple. This color was, in many cultures of ancient times, reserved (Sumptuary laws) for the use of royalty, or at least nobility. Bariaa Mourad. ''"Du Patrimoine à la Muséologie : Conception d'un musée sur le site archéologique de Tyr",'' DEA Thesis (doctoral studies); Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle (MNHN), Study realised in cooperation with the Unesco, Secteur de la Culture, Division du Patrimoine Culturel, Paris, 1998 Tyre was often attacked by Egypt, besieged by Shalmaneser V, who was assisted by the Phoenicians of the mainland, for five years. From 586 until 573 BC, the city was besieged by Nebuchadnezzar II For this reason, early Christian baptistries (Baptismal font) and tombs typically were shaped as octagons. The practice of octaves was first introduced under Constantine I, when the dedication festivities of the basilicas at Jerusalem and Tyre, Lebanon were observed for eight days. After these one-off occasions, annual liturgical feasts began to be dignified with an octave. The first such feasts were Easter, Pentecost, and, in the East, Epiphany (Epiphany (holiday)). This occurred in the fourth century and served as a period of time for the newly baptized to take a joyful retreat. "Octave", ''Catholic Encyclopedia'' Margaritus first appears as a leader of the fleet alongside Tancred, then just count of Lecce, which took Cephalonia and the Ionian Islands in 1185 and then harassed Isaac Comnenus (Isaac Comnenus of Cyprus)' Cyprus and captured many of his ships, taking them back to Sicily. In Autumn 1187, King William sent him with a fleet to the Holy Land, where, on 2 October, Saladin had captured Jerusalem (Siege of Jerusalem (1187)). Margaritus, with 60 ships and 200 knights, patrolled the Palestine coast constantly, preventing Saladin from taking any of the vital seaports of the Latin crusader kingdom (Kingdom of Jerusalem). In July 1188, he arrived at Tripoli (Tripoli, Lebanon) and forced Saladin to raise the siege of Krak des Chevaliers. Something similar happened at Marqab, Latakia, and Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon) in the following year. On 11 November 1189, William died and his fleet returned. On 4 October 1190, Margaritus, the ''strategos'' Jordan du Pin, and many other nobles of Messina were forced to flee when Richard the Lion-Hearted, king of England, sacked the city and burnt it. Margaritus took little part thereafter in the Third Crusade. *It is metal well known in ancient times. It is the general opinion that the Phoenicians (w:Phoenicians) of Tyre (w:Tyre, Lebanon) and Sidon (w:Sidon) obtained their supplies of tin from the British Isles (w:British Isles). In Ezek (w:Book of Ezekiel) (27:12_ it is said to have been brought from Tarshish (w:Tarshish), which was probably a commercial emporium supplied with commodities from other places. In Isa (w:Book of Isaiah) (1:25) the word so rendered is generally understood of lead (w:Pead), the alloy with which the silver had become mixed. The fire of the Babylonish Captivity (w:Babylonish Captivity) would be the means of purging out the idolatrous (w:Idolatrous) alloy that had corrupted the people. **In Bible Dictionary quoted in Dictionary in: "tin".


centuries strong

the island against Antigonos. Ptolemy lost Cyprus to Demetrios Poliorketes in 306 and 294 BC, but after that it remained under Ptolemaic (Ptolemaic dynasty) rule till 58 BC. It was ruled by a governor from Egypt and sometimes formed a minor Ptolemaic kingdom during the power-struggles of the 2nd and 1st centuries. Strong commercial relationships with Athens and Alexandria, two of the most important commercial centres of antiquity, developed. Carthage Carthage


great work

fortress-city with mainland villages along the shore. These mainland settlements were destroyed by Nebuchadnezzar II, but after a 13-year siege from 585–573 BC, the King of Tyre made peace with Nebuchadnezzar, going into exile and leaving the island city itself

intact. ''Encyclopædia Britannica'' 43 xxii 452 Alexander the Great used debris from the mainland to build a causeway to the island, entered the city, and plundered the city, sacking it without mercy.


discovery news

Aided Alexander the Great publisher Discovery News date May 21, 2007 ) and the mainland settlement, originally called Ushu (later called Palaetyrus, meaning "Old Tyre," by the Greeks) was actually more like a line of suburbs than any one city and was used primarily as a source of water and timber for the main island city. 'Tyre' from Encyclopædia Britannica 11th ed. ref

Tyre, Lebanon

website '''Tyre''' (Arabic (Arabic language): south of Beirut. The name of the city means "rock (rock (geology))" (Bikai, P., "The Land of Tyre", in Joukowsky, M., ''The Heritage of Tyre'', 1992, chapter 2, p. 13) after the rocky formation on which the town was originally built. The adjective for Tyre is ''Tyrian'', and the inhabitants are ''Tyrians''.

Tyre is an ancient Phoenician city and the legendary birthplace of Europa (Europa (mythology)) and Elissa (Dido (Queen of Carthage)) (Dido). Today it is the fourth largest city in Lebanon Tyre City, Lebanon and houses one of the nation's major ports. Tourism is a major industry. The city has a number of ancient sites, including its Roman Hippodrome which was added to UNESCO's list of World Heritage Sites in 1979. Resolution 459 Lebanon's Archaeological Heritage

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