Turpan

What is Turpan known for?


historical works

Turpan * Silk Road Seattle - University of Washington (The Silk Road Seattle website contains many useful resources including a number of full-text historical works, maps, photos, etc.) *Karez (Qanats) of Turpan, China *Images and travel impressions along the Silk Road - Turpan PPS in Spanish


classic story

studying Madhyamaka texts such as the works of Nagarjuna. thumb 250px The Big Wild Goose Pagoda Day of Xī'ān, China (Image:Great Goose Pagoda Day 2005.jpg) The classic story of the ''Journey to the West'' was based on real events. In real life, Xuanzang (born c. 602 - 664) was a monk at Jingtu Temple in late-Sui Dynasty and early-Tang Dynasty Chang'an. Motivated by the poor quality of Chinese translations of Buddhist scripture at the time, Xuanzang left Chang'an in 629, despite the border being closed at the time due to war with the Göktürks. Helped by sympathetic Buddhists, he travelled via Gansu and Qinghai to Kumul (Kumul (city)) (Hami), thence following the Tian Shan mountains to Turpan. He then crossed what are today Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, and Afghanistan, into Gandhara, reaching India in 630. Xuanzang travelled throughout the Indian subcontinent for the next thirteen years, visiting important Buddhist pilgrimage sites and studying at the ancient university at Nalanda. The key oasis towns, watered by rainfall from the mountains, were Kashgar, Marin (Marin (China)), Niya (Niya (Tarim Basin)), Yarkand (Yarkent County), and Khotan (Hotan) (Hetian) to the south, Kuqa and Turpan in the north, and Loulan and Dunhuang in the east. Now many, such as Marin and Gaochang, are ruined cities in sparsely inhabited areas in the Xinjiang Autonomous Region (Xinjiang) of the People's Republic of China. Wikipedia:Turpan Commons:Turpan


place matches

, Turpan is the location of the cave, because they believe that place matches the Qur'an's description. The exact dates of their alleged sleep are also not given in the Qur'an; some allege that they entered the cave at the time of Decius (250 AD) and they woke up at the time of Theodosius I (378–395) or Theodosius II (408–450), but neither of these dates can be reconciled with the Qur'an's account of sleeping 300 or 309 years. Some Islamic scholars, however, assert that the 300 or 309 years


musical style

; ref Chinese news sources report that they are Muslim. Muqam is the classical musical style. The '''12 Muqams''' are the national oral epic of the Uyghurs. The muqam system developed among the Uyghur in northwest China and Central Asia over approximately the last 1500 years from the Arabic maqamat modal system that has led


service location

+in+May+1937.+The+eulogy+continued:+As+one+of+the+historians+of+the+older+generation+who+applied+historical&hl en&ei ahW9TNbvL8GBlAepzZjDDw&sa X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 1&ved 0CCUQ6AEwAA title Daily report: People's Republic of China, Issue 34; Issues 36-41 author year 1979 publisher Distributed by National Technical Information Service location isbn page pages accessdate 2010-06-28 There is some confusion as to whether they practice Islam


vegetable oil

Britannica. Retrieved on 2009-04-09 The primary economic activity of the XPCC remains agriculture, including cotton, fruit, vegetables, food crops, vegetable oils, sugar beets, and so forth. Important products are cotton, tomatoes, ketchup, Korla pears, Turpan grapes, wine, and so forth. The XPCC has a mix of factory farming and smaller farms. The territorial expansion of the Kushans helped propagate Bactrian to Northern


writings

contracts were found that showed, where one Sogdian spouse was present, for 18 of them their partner was a Sogdian. The only Sogdian men who married Chinese women were highly eminent officials. Rong Xinjiang, 2001, pp. 132-135. Of the 21 epitaphs, 12 are from ''Quan Tangwen buyi'' (supplement to the complete writings of the Tang), five from ''Tangdai muzhi huibian'' (Collected epitaphs of the Tang), three were excavated at Guyuan, Ningxia, and one is from another site. ref

the Khocho ruins, 10th 11th century AD. Located in the Museum für Indische Kunst, Berlin-Dahlem. Manichaeism presented an elaborate description of the conflict between the spiritual world of light and the material world of darkness. The beings of both the world of darkness and the world of light have names. There are numerous sources for the details of the Manichaean belief. There are two portions of Manichaean scriptures that are probably the closest thing to the original Manichaean writings

by Mani. The original six Syriac writings are not preserved, although their Syriac names have been. There are also fragments and quotations from them. A long quotation, preserved by the eighth-century Nestorian Christian author Theodore Bar Konai, Original Syriac in: Theodorus bar Konai, ''Liber Scholiorum, II'', ed. A. Scher, ''Corpus Scriptorum Christianorum Orientalium scrip. syri'', 1912, pp. 311–8, ISBN 978-90-429-0104-9; English translation in: A.V.W


historical amp

(1898-1968); he was a member of the Chinese Communist Party. Wikipedia:Turpan Commons:Turpan


food+oil

spectrometry AMS dated 2475 ± 30 years BP) and a wooden bowl with cannabis traces. Lacking any "suitable evidence that the ancient, indigenous people utilized ''Cannabis'' for food, oil, or fiber", they concluded "the deceased was more concerned with the intoxicant and or medicinal value of the ''Cannabis'' remains."


brilliant quot

to ''argenteus'', i.e. "shining, brilliant"). According to Douglas Q. Adams, the Tocharians may have called themselves ''ākñi'', meaning "borderers, marchers". Kumārajīva left Kashgar with Jīva at age 12, and traveled to Turpan, the north-eastern limit of the kingdom of Kucha, which was home to more than 10,000 monks. Somewhere around this time, he encountered the master Suryasoma, who instructed him in early Mahayana texts. Kumārajīva soon converted, and began studying Madhyamaka texts such as the works of Nagarjuna. thumb 250px The Big Wild Goose Pagoda Day of Xī'ān, China (Image:Great Goose Pagoda Day 2005.jpg) The classic story of the ''Journey to the West'' was based on real events. In real life, Xuanzang (born c. 602 - 664) was a monk at Jingtu Temple in late-Sui Dynasty and early-Tang Dynasty Chang'an. Motivated by the poor quality of Chinese translations of Buddhist scripture at the time, Xuanzang left Chang'an in 629, despite the border being closed at the time due to war with the Göktürks. Helped by sympathetic Buddhists, he travelled via Gansu and Qinghai to Kumul (Kumul (city)) (Hami), thence following the Tian Shan mountains to Turpan. He then crossed what are today Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, and Afghanistan, into Gandhara, reaching India in 630. Xuanzang travelled throughout the Indian subcontinent for the next thirteen years, visiting important Buddhist pilgrimage sites and studying at the ancient university at Nalanda. The key oasis towns, watered by rainfall from the mountains, were Kashgar, Marin (Marin (China)), Niya (Niya (Tarim Basin)), Yarkand (Yarkent County), and Khotan (Hotan) (Hetian) to the south, Kuqa and Turpan in the north, and Loulan and Dunhuang in the east. Now many, such as Marin and Gaochang, are ruined cities in sparsely inhabited areas in the Xinjiang Autonomous Region (Xinjiang) of the People's Republic of China. Wikipedia:Turpan Commons:Turpan

Turpan

'''Turpan''' ( ; t 吐魯番 s 吐鲁番 (:wikt:吐鲁番) p Tǔlǔfān ), also known as '''Turfan''' , is an oasis county-level city in Turpan Prefecture, in Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (Xinjiang) of the People's Republic of China (China). Its population was 254,900 at the end of 2003.

Search by keywords:


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017