Tulum

What is Tulum known for?


sports event

address lat long directions phone tollfree fax hours price content Is a sports event held annually at Tulum Beach and is open registration. Fun and sports for everyone with live music, beach volleyball, paddle boards, kayaks, swimming, kite boarding and more. A great weekend of fun activities to celebrate the beauty of the beach and wind. There's something for everyone! * '''Kitesurf'''. :* '''Extreme Control''' - the beaches of Tulum


species range

of the large lizard family (family (biology)), Iguanidae and is native to Mexico and Central America. The species range in size (total length, including the tail) from about 5 inches to well over one meter. The distinctive feature of this genus is presence of the enlarged, spiny scales on the tail. Ctenousaurs are generally omnivorous (omnivore), feeding on fruits, flowers, foliage, and small animals. Some members of this genus are popular as pets. At least two species


early classic

and Frederick Catherwood in 1843 in the book ''Incidents of Travel in Yucatan''. As they arrived from the sea, Stephens and Catherwood first saw a tall building that impressed them greatly, most likely the great Castillo (Castillo de Chapultepec) of the site. They made accurate maps of the site’s walls, and Catherwood made sketches of the Castillo and several other buildings. Stephens and Catherwood also reported an early classic stele (Tulum Stela 1) at the site, with an inscribed date of AD 564


amp place

(now in the British Museum's collection), which is interpreted to mean that it was most likely built elsewhere and brought to Tulum to be reused.amp;place 13448&plaA 13448-3-1&page 1 British Museum Collection File:TulumCatherwood1844.jpg left thumb 450px Main temple at Tulum, by Frederick Catherwood, from ''Views of Ancient


portraying

been criticized for portraying a type of human sacrifice which was more typical of the Aztecs than of the Maya (Maya civilization). Archaeologist Lisa Lucero said, "the classic Maya really didn't go in for mass sacrifice. That was the Aztecs." Anthropology professor Karl Taube argued that, "We know the Aztecs did that level of killing. Their accounts speak of 20,000."


serving excellent

to find what you need. *


site+show

of Archeology and Traditional Culture, Nicholas J. Saunders, Published by ABC-CLIO, 2005. p. 299 Jade and obsidian appear to be some of the more prestigious materials found here as the obsidian would have had to have traveled clear from Ixtepeque in northern Guatemala which was nearly away from Tulum. This huge distance coupled with the density of obsidian found at the site show that Tulum was a major center for the trading of obsidian. ref name


critically acclaimed

the beginning of the hotel zone. *


important site

the site, Tulum appears to have been an important site for the worship of the Diving or Descending god. Tulum had an estimated population of 1,000 to 1,600 inhabitants. Tulum was first mentioned by Juan Díaz (Juan Díaz (Spanish conquistador)), a member of Juan de Grijalva's (Juan de Grijalva) Spanish expedition of 1518, the first Europeans to spot Tulum. The first detailed description of the ruins was published by John Lloyd Stephens and Frederick Catherwood in 1843 in the book ''Incidents of Travel in Yucatan''. As they arrived from the sea, Stephens and Catherwood first saw a tall building that impressed them greatly, most likely the great Castillo (Castillo de Chapultepec) of the site. They made accurate maps of the site’s walls, and Catherwood made sketches of the Castillo and several other buildings. Stephens and Catherwood also reported an early classic stele (Tulum Stela 1) at the site, with an inscribed date of AD 564 (now in the British Museum's collection), which is interpreted to mean that it was most likely built elsewhere and brought to Tulum to be reused. British Museum Collection left thumb 450px Main temple at Tulum, by Frederick Catherwood, from ''Views of Ancient Monuments'' (File:TulumCatherwood1844.jpg) Work conducted at Tulum continued with that of Sylvanus Morley and George P. Howe, beginning in 1913. They worked to restore and open the public beaches. The work was continued by the Carnegie Institution from 1916 to 1922, Samuel Lothrop in 1924 who also mapped the site, Miguel Ángel Fernández in the late 1930s and early 1940s, William Sanders (William Sanders (archaeologist)) in 1956, and then later in the 1970s by Arthur G. Miller. Through these investigations done by Sanders and Miller it has been determined that Tulum was occupied during the late Postclassic period around AD 1200. The site continued to be occupied until contact with the Spanish was made in the early 16th century. By the end of the 16th century the site was abandoned completely. "The Ancient Maya", Robert J. Sharer and Loa P. Traxler, Published by Stanford University Press 2006. pp. 608–611. Climate Considered a tropical savanna climate typically with a pronounced dry season. The Köppen Climate Classification subtype for this climate is ''Aw'' (Tropical savanna climate) (Tropical Savanna Climate). Commons:Category:Tulum


wonderful beaches

to a garden panorama a Private toilet and bath. * *

Tulum

--- name Tulum official_name other_name Zama native_name Tulu'um nickname settlement_type Maya Site total_type motto image_skyline Tulum-Seaside-2010.jpg imagesize image_caption The seaside view of El Castillo at Tulum image_flag Bandera de Tulum.png pushpin_map Mexico pushpin_label_position left pushpin_map_caption Location on the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico pushpin_mapsize coordinates_region MX subdivision_type Country subdivision_name Mexico subdivision_type1 State (States of Mexico) subdivision_name1 Quintana Roo subdivision_type2 Municipality (Municipalities of Quintana Roo) subdivision_name2 Tulum (Municipality of Tulum) established_title Earliest inscription established_date AD 564 established_title1 Constructed established_date1 1200 and 1450 area_magnitude unit_pref Imperial area_footnotes area_total_km2 area_land_km2 area_water_km2 area_total_sq_mi area_land_sq_mi area_water_sq_mi area_water_percent elevation_footnotes tags-- elevation_m 12 elevation_ft elevation_max_m elevation_max_ft elevation_min_m elevation_min_ft

timezone CST (Time in Mexico) utc_offset -6 timezone_DST Central Daylight Time (North American Central Time Zone) utc_offset_DST -5 coor_type latd 20 latm 12 lats 53 latNS N longd 87 longm 25 longs 44 longEW W blank_name_sec2 Major Airport blank_info_sec2 Cancún International Airport (Cancun airport) blank1_name_sec2 IATA Code (IATA Airport Code) blank1_info_sec2 CUN (Cancun airport) blank2_name_sec2 ICAO Code (ICAO airport code) blank2_info_sec2 MMUN (Cancun airport) website footnotes

'''Tulum''' (Yucatec (Yucatec Maya language): ''Tulu'um'') is the site of a Pre-Columbian Maya (Maya civilization) walled city (Defensive wall) serving as a major port for Cobá. "Maya sites in Quintana Roo: Tulúm" (history), ''Athena Review'' Vol.2, no.1, 2003, webpage: AthenaPub-Tulum. The ruins are situated on tall cliffs, along the east coast of the Yucatán Peninsula on the Caribbean Sea in the state of Quintana Roo, Mexico. Tulum was one of the last cities inhabited and built by the Mayas; it was at its height between the 13th and 15th centuries and managed to survive about 70 years after the Spanish began occupying Mexico. Old World diseases brought by the Spanish settlers appear to have been the cause of its demise. One of the best-preserved coastal Maya sites, Tulum is today a popular site for tourists (Tourism).

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