Tigard, Oregon

What is Tigard, Oregon known for?


breaking quot

. County). After years of delays due to lack of funding, the project received approval from the Federal Transit Administration in May 2004, "Wilsonville–Beaverton commuter train OK'd" (May 11, 2004). ''The Oregonian'' (MetroWest edition), p. C1. resulting in the funding of approximately 50 percent of the line's capital costs. Track work began October 23, 2006, in Wilsonville (Wilsonville, Oregon), and a ceremonial "ground-breaking&quot

11, 2004). ''The Oregonian'' (MetroWest edition), p. C1. resulting in the funding of approximately 50 percent of the line's capital costs. Track work began October 23, 2006, in Wilsonville (Wilsonville, Oregon), and a ceremonial "ground-breaking" was held two days later in Tigard (Tigard, Oregon),


blue book

: www.bluebook.state.or.us local populations pop04.htm Oregon Blue Book Incorporated in 1961, the city is located south of Beaverton (Beaverton, Oregon) and north of Tualatin (Tualatin, Oregon), and is part of the Portland metropolitan area. Interstate 5 (Interstate 5 in Oregon) and Oregon Route 217 are the main freeways in the city, with Oregon Route 99W and Oregon Route 210 serving as other major highways, with rail service provided by the TriMet-operated

at Stanford University *Kaitlin Olson, actress


story building

key_people Raymond Yu, CEO Lisa Prentice, CFO br>


television advertising

Unit In mid-2005 InFocus acquired the company TUN (The University Network), which provided digital media and thin screen television advertising to colleges, and then sold it in late 2006 to Submedia LLC. The company later became a publicly traded


historic place

The John Tigard House, constructed by the son of Wilson M. Tigard in 1880 at the corner of SW Pacific Hwy and SW Gaarde St, remains, having been saved from demolition in the 1970s by the Tigard Area Historical and Preservation Association. It became registered as a National Historic Place in 1979, and now stands at the corner of SW Canterbury Lane and SW 103rd. During the Portland Rose Festival every summer, the Tigard Festival of Balloons is held at Cook Park near Tigard High School


building featuring

in growth as Main Street blossomed with the construction of several new commercial buildings, Germania Hall (a two-story building featuring a restaurant, grocery store, dance hall, and rooms to rent), a shop post office, and a livery stable. Limited telephone service began in 1908. In 1910, the arrival of the Oregon Electric Railway triggered the development of Main Street and pushed Tigardville from being merely a small farming community into a period of growth which would lead to its


quot century

) and a meeting hall, and renamed East Butte to "Tigardville" in 1886.

incorporation as a city in 1961. The town was renamed Tigard in 1907 by the railroad to greater distinguish it from the nearby Wilsonville (Wilsonville, Oregon), and the focus of the town reoriented northeast towards the new rail stop as growth accelerated. 1911 marked the introduction of electricity, as the Tualatin Valley Electric company joined Tigard to a service grid with Sherwood (Sherwood, Oregon) and Tualatin (Tualatin, Oregon). William Ariss built


210

: www.bluebook.state.or.us local populations pop04.htm Oregon Blue Book Incorporated in 1961, the city is located south of Beaverton (Beaverton, Oregon) and north of Tualatin (Tualatin, Oregon), and is part of the Portland metropolitan area. Interstate 5 (Interstate 5 in Oregon) and Oregon Route 217 are the main freeways in the city, with Oregon Route 99W and Oregon Route 210 serving as other major highways, with rail service provided by the TriMet-operated

along the eastern edge of the city, with Oregon Route 217's southern terminus at I-5 at Tigard. Other major roads are Oregon Route 99W, Boones Ferry Road, and Hall Boulevard (Boones Ferry and Hall, along with a small portion of Durham Road, are the components of Oregon Route 141). Oregon Route 210 is located along the northern boundary, separating Tigard from Beaverton. Public transportation is provided by TriMet, with service via buses and the Westside Express Service

of Aloha (north of Tualatin Valley Highway), Raleigh Hills (north of Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway), Bonny Slope (Bonny Slope, Oregon), Bethany (Bethany, Oregon), West Slope (West Slope, Oregon) and Cedar Hills (Cedar Hills, Oregon). District 4 will be entirely within Washington County. In the community of Raleigh Hills (Raleigh Hills, Oregon), OR 10 intersects with Oregon Route 210 (locally known as Scholls Ferry Road), which heads southwest towards Progress, Oregon Progress


track work

. County). After years of delays due to lack of funding, the project received approval from the Federal Transit Administration in May 2004, "Wilsonville–Beaverton commuter train OK'd" (May 11, 2004). ''The Oregonian'' (MetroWest edition), p. C1. resulting in the funding of approximately 50 percent of the line's capital costs. Track work began October 23, 2006, in Wilsonville (Wilsonville, Oregon), and a ceremonial "ground-breaking"

11, 2004). ''The Oregonian'' (MetroWest edition), p. C1. resulting in the funding of approximately 50 percent of the line's capital costs. Track work began October 23, 2006, in Wilsonville (Wilsonville, Oregon), and a ceremonial "ground-breaking" was held two days later in Tigard (Tigard, Oregon),


commercial buildings

. The racial makeup of the city was 79.6% White (White (U.S. Census)), 1.8% African American (African American (U.S. Census)), 0.7% Native American (Native American (U.S. Census)), 7.2% Asian (Asian (U.S. Census)), 0.9% Pacific Islander (Race (U.S. Census)), 5.9% from other races (Race (U.S. Census)), and 4.0% from two or more races. Hispanic (Hispanic (U.S. Census)) or Latino (Latino (U.S. Census)) of any race were 12.7% of the population. There were 19,157 households of which 33.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.4% were married couples (Marriage) living together, 10.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.6% had a male householder with no wife present, and 34.9% were non-families. 26.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 3.04. The median age in the city was 37.4 years. 24.1% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.1% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 29.2% were from 25 to 44; 27.4% were from 45 to 64; and 11.3% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49.0% male and 51.0% female. 2000 census As of the census of 2000, there were 41,223 people, 16,507 households, and 10,746 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,795.3 people per square mile (1,465.6 km²). There were 17,369 housing units at an average density of 1,599.1 per square mile (617.5 km²). The racial makeup of the city was 85.38% White (White (U.S. Census)), 5.57% Asian (Asian (U.S. Census)), 1.14% African American (African American (U.S. Census)), 0.61% Native American (Native American (U.S. Census)), 0.53% Pacific Islander (Pacific Islander (U.S. Census)), 3.76% from other races (Race (United States Census)), and 3.00% from two or more races

Tigard, Oregon

'''Tigard''' As of 2007, Tigard was the state's 12th largest city. Oregon Blue Book Incorporated in 1961, the city is located south of Beaverton (Beaverton, Oregon) and north of Tualatin (Tualatin, Oregon), and is part of the Portland metropolitan area. Interstate 5 (Interstate 5 in Oregon) and Oregon Route 217 are the main freeways in the city, with Oregon Route 99W and Oregon Route 210 serving as other major highways, with rail service provided by the TriMet-operated Westside Express Service.

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