The Pas

What is The Pas known for?


major population


made famous

%), never been married (32.3%), divorced or separated (8.8%), or widowed (5.7%). There are 2,324 private dwellings (Dwellings) in The Pas, most of them being occupied (94.1%). The average number of people per household is 2.5 people. Culture The Pas was made famous for many young Canadians when author Farley Mowat published in 1956, the first of two children's' young adults' books set in the vicinity and which mentions the town prominently, titled Lost in the Barrens


business association

on the ''Central Plains Farm Business Association''. He was named Manitoba's Outstanding Young Farmer in 1995, and Canada's Outstanding Young Farmer in 1995. On May 19, 1984, Harry's eldest daughter Marianne married Todd Lamb (Todd Lamb (Lamb Air)), the grandson of Tom Lamb from The Pas, Manitoba. Tom Lamb was the founder of Lamb Air. Burrell was educated at The Pas, Manitoba, and received


rich gold

, Easterville (Easterville, Manitoba) and Norway House (Norway House, Manitoba). In the early 20th century, rich gold, copper, and zinc deposits were discovered nearby in what would soon become the area of Flin Flon, Manitoba. Mining development in the area fueled a great deal of local infrastructure development, beginning with the extension of the rail line and Highway 10 from The Pas, Manitoba to Flin Flon, both of which passed through Cranberry Portage, a requirement of having large lakes lying North and South of the traditional portage. During the 1980s, he was a popular mayor in The Pas, Manitoba. In the provincial election of 1988 (Manitoba general election, 1988), he ran in the as a Progressive Conservative (Progressive Conservative Party of Manitoba) in the riding of The Pas (The Pas (electoral district)), losing to New Democratic Party (New Democratic Party of Manitoba) incumbent Harry Harapiak.


outstanding young

on the ''Central Plains Farm Business Association''. He was named Manitoba's Outstanding Young Farmer in 1995,


current amp

first Kelly title Kennedy's leadership bid unusual url http: pqasb.pqarchiver.com thestar access 18861951.html?FMT ABS&FMTS ABS:FT&type current&date Nov+19%2C+1996&author By+Kelly+Toughill+TORONTO+STAR&pub Toronto+Star&edition &startpage A.19&desc Kennedy%27s+leadership+bid+unusual+Former+food+bank+director+seen+as+both+savior+and+outsider accessdate 2011-04-11 newspaper Toronto Star date 1996-11-19 page A19 When Trent's hockey program was cancelled


live television

in June, 1962 as CBWBT-1. The station broadcast kinescope recordings sent to the transmitter from CBWT. On March 1, 1969, the province-wide microwave system replaced the kinescope recordings, and The Pas has enjoyed live television since then.


regular service

a Certificate of Communications in Cranberry Portage (Cranberry Portage, Manitoba). He worked as a commercial fisherman before entering political life, and was a Director of the Manitoba Federation of Fishermen for a time. April events * April 25 – Canadian National Railway operates its last steam locomotive in regular service, 4-8-2 #6043, on train No. 76 from The Pas to Winnipeg. *Interlake School Division - Stonewall, Manitoba * Kelsey School


scholarship

, and her family lived in Canada's Prairie region. At age 14, Kennedy moved to Winnipeg to attended St. John's-Ravenscourt School on a hockey scholarship. After high school, he attended Trent University in Peterborough (Peterborough, Ontario), Ontario, also on a hockey scholarship.


century rich

, Easterville (Easterville, Manitoba) and Norway House (Norway House, Manitoba). In the early 20th century, rich gold, copper, and zinc deposits were discovered nearby in what would soon become the area of Flin Flon, Manitoba. Mining development in the area fueled a great deal of local infrastructure development, beginning with the extension of the rail line and Highway 10 from The Pas, Manitoba to Flin Flon, both of which passed through Cranberry Portage

The Pas

'''The Pas''' ( ; French (French language): '''Le Pas''') is a town in Manitoba, Canada, located at the confluence of the Pasquia (Pasquia River) and the Saskatchewan (Saskatchewan River) rivers, at Saskin Division No. 21, Manitoba in the Northern Region (Northern Region, Manitoba). It is some 630 kilometres northwest of the provincial capital, Winnipeg, and about 40 kilometres from the border of Saskatchewan. It is sometimes still called '''Paskoyac''' by locals after the first trading post, called Fort Paskoyac and constructed during French colonial rule. The Pasquia River begins in the Pasquia Hills in east central Saskatchewan. The French in 1795 knew the river as Basquiau.

Known as "The Gateway to the North", The Pas is a multi-industry northern Manitoba town serving a district population of over 15,000 (including the Opaskwayak Cree Nation). The main components of the region's economy are agriculture, forestry, commercial fishing, tourism, transportation, and services (especially health and education). The main employer is a paper and lumber mill operated by Tolko Industries. The Pas contains one of the two main campuses of the University College of the North.

The Pas is bordered by the Rural Municipality of Kelsey (Kelsey, Manitoba), as well as part of the Opaskwayak Cree Nation.

Search by keywords:


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017