Tenderloin, San Francisco

What is Tenderloin, San Francisco known for?


numerous free

artist with Asian Improv Records; Lucy Jane Bledsoe, published novelist and writer for the East Bay Express; Pearl Ubungen, choreographer; Ben Clarke, Founding Editor of Freedom Voices; and Maketa Groves, poet and published author at Curbstone Press; and Tenderloin resident and Athabaskan poet Mary TallMountain offered numerous free workshops. TREC and its publishing project Freedom Voices continue to offer workshops on an occasional basis at the Public Library, Hospitality House, the Faithful


live albums

: www.allaboutjazz.com php article.php?id 11727 Thelonious Monk, Thelonious Monk ''At the Blackhawk'' Gerry Mulligan, and other jazz greats recorded live albums for Fantasy Records in the late 1950s and early 1960s. With housing consisting almost entirely of single-room-occupancy hotel rooms, studio and one bedroom apartments, the Tenderloin historically housed single adults and couples. After World War II


people playing

----------- image_skyline Tenderloin Street Chess, SF, CA, jjron 26.03.2012.jpg image_alt image_caption People playing chess along Market St in Tenderloin nickname The L's, Little Saigon,


holding free

and intoxicated (Drunkenness) people during the daytime. Periodically there are efforts to improve the park, such as holding free concerts. The Tenderloin Children's Playground, on Ellis Street between Leavenworth and Hyde Streets, was opened in 1995 and has attractive indoor and outdoor recreational facilities and hosts a number of community and family events. Sgt. John Macaulay Park, named after a San Francisco police officer who was killed in the adjacent alley while on duty, is a small gated playground at the corner of O'Farrell and Larkin Streets. Although the park is located across. the street from a strip club, it is frequented by parents and children from the neighborhood. The "Tenderloin National Forest" (a project of the nonprofit organization The Luggage Store 509 Cultural Center) is an unofficial park that was established from 1987–present that maintains the park and opening hours. It is located on Cohen Alley just off Ellis Street. Renaming attempt In March 2011, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) Vice President Tracy Reiman sent Mayor Ed Lee (Ed Lee (politician)) a letter proposing for renaming of the neighborhood and suggesting alternative name like the Tempeh District, San Francisco, California, United States type Nightclub


promoting quot

and promoting "Zine Weekends." Crime The Tenderloin is a high-crime neighborhood, particularly violent street crime such as robbery and aggravated assault. Seven of the top ten violent crime plots (out of 665 in the entire city as measured by the San Francisco Police Department) are adjacent plots in the Tenderloin and Sixth and Market area. The neighborhood was considered to be the origin of a notorious Filipino gang Bahala Na Gang or BNG, a gang imported from the Philippines


diverse community

. title Banning parking on Tenderloin block drives trouble away url http: www.sfgate.com bayarea nevius article Banning-parking-on-Tenderloin-block-drives-5208612.php publisher San Francisco Chronicle accessdate 25 February 2014 date 6 February 2014 Social services The Tenderloin has been the home of Raphael House, the first provider in the city of shelter for homeless parents and children, since 1971. It is an ethnically diverse community, consisting of families, young people living in cheap apartments, downtown bohemian artists, and recent immigrants from Latin America and Southeast Asia. It is home to a large population of homeless, those living in extreme poverty, and numerous non-profit social service agencies, soup kitchens, religious rescue missions, homeless shelters and Single Room Occupancy hotels. Central City SRO Collaborative http: www.ccsro.org The Tenderloin Housing Clinic (THC) has offered important social services to the poor of this neighborhood for decades. According to its Director, Randy Shaw, the clinic's "mission is to prevent tenant displacement, preserve and expand the city’s low cost housing stock and to provide comprehensive legal assistance to low income tenants. The Clinic is successful in fulfilling this mission by providing free legal services, securing SRO units through the Master Lease program and offering comprehensive support services to our clients." The Care Through Touch Institute (CTI), located between Hyde and Leavenworth Streets, offers free seated massage therapy to clients in the Tenderloin community. The founder and director of CTI, Mary Ann Finch, began offering services here in 1997, after being inspired by her volunteer work with Mother Teresa in India. Today, CTI serves primarily low-income and homeless clients at sites such as the Gubbio Project at St. Boniface Church, Tenderloin Self-Help, Tom Waddell health clinic, MCSC, and Martin de Porres House of Hospitality. CTI also offers a 180-hour training in "Seated Massage Therapy, Social Consciousness, and Spiritual Practice" for people who are interested in volunteering with CTI. Religious institutions providing community services to the Tenderloin include Glide Memorial Church, which was reinvigorated by Cecil Williams in 1963, St. Anthony's (St. Anthony Dining Room), a program of the Franciscans and San Francisco City Impact founded by Pastor Roger Huang. These all provide meals and other social services to poor and homeless residents and others. Glide and the surrounding neighborhood provided much of the setting for the 2006 film ''The Pursuit of Happyness''. In 2008, The Salvation Army opened the Ray and Joan Kroc Community Center, a multipurpose center featuring a gym, swimming pool and fitness center among other amenities. The funding for this center was made possible by a 1.5 billion dollar bequest from Joan Kroc, the widow of McDonald's founder, Ray Kroc. Adjacent to the Kroc center is Railton Place, a 110 unit apartment complex run by the Salvation Army for former foster youth, homeless veterans, and adults recovering from addictions. Culture In recent years, residents have spearheaded a local arts revival. In 1987, residents and others from the Aarti Hotel on Leavenworth Street founded the 509 Cultural Center at 509 Ellis Street. After the 1989 earthquake damaged that facility, artists founded The Luggage Store at 1007 Market, at the intersection of 6th Street, Market, Taylor and Golden Gate Avenue. In 1989 the Tenderloin Reflection and Education Center (TREC) spun off from St Anthony foundation and operated a cultural center including dance, music, writing quilting, and other arts workshops in the St. Boniface Neighborhood Center. Artists and activists such as Eric Ehn from the Iowa Writing Workshop and Theatre Artaud; Miya Masoaka, a recording artist with Asian Improv Records; Lucy Jane Bledsoe, published novelist and writer for the East Bay Express; Pearl Ubungen, choreographer; Ben Clarke, Founding Editor of Freedom Voices; and Maketa Groves, poet and published author at Curbstone Press; and Tenderloin resident and Athabaskan poet Mary TallMountain offered numerous free workshops. TREC and its publishing project Freedom Voices continue to offer workshops on an occasional basis at the Public Library, Hospitality House, the Faithful Fools and other locations in the neighborhood. Tender Leaves, the Center's literary journal was published from 1987-2006. From 2006 to 2009, ''The Loin's Mouth'', conceived by its editor Rachel M., was a semi-quarterly publication about life in the Tenderloin and Tendernob areas. Since then, others have come about to fill the gap including the ''Tenderloin Reading Series'', which is a quarterly literary event in the neighborhood as well as The Tender, which is a local journal focusing on the events, food, and politics of the neighborhood. In 2006, Gray Area Foundation for the Arts was formed to produce, exhibit, and develop creativity with the most contemporary new media technologies. Initially located on Taylor Street in an San Francisco, California, United States type Nightclub


free legal

) has offered important social services to the poor of this neighborhood for decades. According to its Director, Randy Shaw, the clinic's "mission is to prevent tenant displacement, preserve and expand the city’s low cost housing stock and to provide comprehensive legal assistance to low income tenants. The Clinic is successful in fulfilling this mission by providing free legal services, securing SRO units through the Master Lease program and offering comprehensive support services to our


prostitution

were able to afford the good cut of meat. Yet another story, also likely apocryphal, is that the name is a reference to the "loins" of prostitutes (Prostitution). The Tenderloin borders the Mission Market Street corridor, which follows the Spaniards' El Camino Real (El Camino Real (California)), which in turn traced an ancient north south Indian trail. The Tenderloin is sheltered by Nob Hill (Nob Hill, San Francisco), and far enough from the San Francisco Bay bay

, the name "Tenderloin" does not appear on any maps of San Francisco prior to the 1930s; before then, it was labeled as "Downtown", although it may have been informally referred to as "the Tenderloin" as early as the 1910s. The area had an active nightlife in the late 19th century with many theaters, restaurants and hotels. Notorious madam (Procuring (prostitution)) Tessie Wall opened her first brothel on O'Farrell Street in 1898. Almost all of the buildings

reference to Tenderloin as "worst neighborhood in San Francisco http: www.sfgate.com traveler guide sf neighborhoods tenderloin.shtml Squalid conditions, homelessness, crime, illegal drug trade, prostitution, liquor stores, and strip clubs give the neighborhood a seedy reputation. Part of the neighborhood forms part of the theater district. Prominent theatres include the Geary, the home of the American Conservatory Theater, and the Curran Theatre Curran


quot shooting

is the Mitchell Brothers O'Farrell Theater. In his seminar 'Take Charge of Your Life', Jim Rohn recounted his visits to the Tenderloin to experience the "human tragedy". He described his visit to a bar in the Tenderloin where the bar tender told him about a dancer by the name of Cookie, who was severely crippled and had a child suffering from leukemia. Murals The Tenderloin serves as a mecca for the art scene in San Francisco, housing the "White Walls" gallery and &quot

;Shooting Gallery". The Tenderloin has been home to mural work by artists such as Banksy, Shepard Fairey, Barry McGee, Mike Giant, Blek Le Rat and Dan Plasma. The "Book & Job" gallery has become known for hosting skating legends such as Tommy Guerrero


dance music

damaged that facility, artists founded The Luggage Store at 1007 Market, at the intersection of 6th Street, Market, Taylor and Golden Gate Avenue. In 1989 the Tenderloin Reflection and Education Center (TREC) spun off from St Anthony foundation and operated a cultural center including dance, music, writing quilting, and other arts workshops in the St. Boniface Neighborhood Center. Artists and activists such as Eric Ehn from the Iowa Writing Workshop and Theatre Artaud; Miya Masoaka, a recording

Tenderloin, San Francisco

The '''Tenderloin''' is a neighborhood in downtown San Francisco, California, in the flatlands on the southern slope of Nob Hill (Nob Hill, San Francisco), situated between the Union Square (Union Square, San Francisco) shopping district to the northeast and the Civic Center (Civic Center, San Francisco) office district to the southwest. It encompasses about 50 square blocks, is a large wedge triangle in shape (point faces East), and a conservative description has it bounded on the north by Geary Street, on the east by Mason Street, on the south by Market Street (Market Street (San Francisco)) and on the west by Van Ness Avenue. The northern boundary with Lower Nob Hill (Neighborhoods in San Francisco#Lower Nob Hill) historically has been set at Geary Street (Geary Boulevard).

The terms Tenderloin Heights or The Tendernob (Tendernob) refer to the area around the indefinite boundary between the Upper Tenderloin and Lower Nob Hill. The eastern extent, near Union Square, overlaps with the Theater District (San Francisco Theater District). Part of the western extent of the Tenderloin, Larkin and Hyde Streets between Turk and O'Farrell (Jasper O'Farrell), was officially named "Little Saigon (Little Saigon#San Francisco)" by the City of San Francisco.

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