Tehuantepec

What is Tehuantepec known for?


extraordinary variety

; Schimmer As stated by Schatzkès & Schimmer, "Amongst the collections of cancellations, Mexico is pre-eminent. No other country possesses such a remarkable selection of ornamental cachets of unusual dimensions and of an extraordinary variety." Schatzkès & Schimmer (#Schatzkès&Schimmer) p. x. In 1852, Augustus was appointed United States consul for the port of Tehuantepec on the Pacific Ocean


local power

" DeMott, p.93. The role model for Tehuana women was a woman by the name of Juana Cata Romero who lived in the late 19th and early 20th century. She began as a humble candy seller, but would rise to become a local power brokers and one of the most revered figures in the city. DeMott, p.18. Romero rose to prominence by befriending a young soldier, then Lieutenant Colonel Porfirio Díaz. Díaz was charged with guarding


political activism

; During the 1980s, the diocese faced violence by regional power-holders, with two serious assassination attempts in the years before Lona’s retirement. The goal of these groups was to suppress further political activism similar to the Zapatista uprising in Chiapas. Cleary, p.175. Attacks against Lona and allies would continue into the 1990s.


introducing quot

of the city is divided into fifteen neighborhoods called barrios, each of which has its own church. Each of these churches have their own patron saint, which is celebrated each year during an event called a “vela.” Velas are celebrations of pre Hispanic origin which occur in each

as religious festivals, today, most have lost their religious basis. DeMott, p.76. Most of these velas occur in the summer. The vela of Santa María Reoloteca occurs between 13 and 18 August. The Vela of Guiexoba occurs at the beginning of the year. The neighborhood is divided into north and south into a friendly rivalry of who can bring the best musicians from various parts of the state. In addition


works projects

''), in this region coffee and chili peppers are produced. The eastern Mixe live near the city Matías Romero in the tropical lowlands of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, here, at elevations from 35 to 1000 meters tropical crops such as bananas and plantains and sugar cane is produced. The Mixe region borders on regions inhabited by Zapotec (Zapotec people)s and Chinantecs, with whom the Mixe have some contact. The Mixe region is watered by three large rivers the Papaloapan (Papaloapan River), the Coatzacoalcos (Coatzacoalcos River) and the Tehuantepec (Tehuantepec River). Three peaks in the Sierra Mixe reach heights above 3300 meters: at Cempoaltepetl (in Mixe ''Ipxyukp'' "the Mountain of twenty heads"), Cerro Blanco and Cerro Malinche. 500px left thumb The major towns of the Mixe Region (Image:Sierramixes.png) :::"''In the whole territory, from one sea to the other, the natives serve without complaint, save for two provinces which lie between those of Teguantepeque (Tehuantepec), Chinanta (Chinantla), Guaxaca (Oaxaca) and Guazacualco (Coatzacoalcos), in the middle of all four; the people of these two provinces are called Zapotecas and Mixes. Their land is so rocky that it cannot be crossed even on foot, for I have twice sent people to conquer them, who were unable to do so because of the roughness of the terrain, and because the warriors are very fierce and well armed''" Hernán Cortés, Fourth Letter to King Charles V Page 318 ''Letters from Mexico'' translated by Anthony Pagden (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1986.) ISBN 0300090943 Before the Aztecs, the area was a restless tribute region of Tehuantepec, with the dominant ethnicity being Mame (Mame people). In 1486, Aztec emperor Ahuitzotl conquered it and into what is now Central America. The area was then required to send cotton clothing, bird feathers, tiger skins and cacao. However, rebellions against the Aztecs continued with Moctezuma Xocoyotzin sending troops to pacify the area in 1502 and 1505. When John Forsyth Jr., editor-in-chief of the ''Mobile Register'' of Mobile, Alabama became minister to Mexico in 1856, O'Hara took his place in the newspaper. He continued to follow government orders, such as his diplomatic mission into the Tehuantepec grant debate. Although speculated, it was never proven that he was involved with William Walker (William Walker (filibuster))'s filibuster expedition to Nicaragua. right thumb upright One real stamp, 1856, with Oaxaca "Oajaca" (Image:Mexico 2 Oajaca.jpg) overprint and Tehuantepec cancellation The postal cancellations used on Mexico's classic period stamps have been very popular among philatelists and have been the subject of extensive study. Schatzkès & Schimmer (#Schatzkès&Schimmer) As stated by Schatzkès & Schimmer, "Amongst the collections of cancellations, Mexico is pre-eminent. No other country possesses such a remarkable selection of ornamental cachets of unusual dimensions and of an extraordinary variety." Schatzkès & Schimmer (#Schatzkès&Schimmer) p. x. In 1852, Augustus was appointed United States consul for the port of Tehuantepec on the Pacific Ocean, and in 1858 he was given the same position for the port of Minotitlán. These offices gave him control of the consular affairs of the United States for the entire Isthmus of Tehuantepec, a commercially important position. The excesses and abuses of his subordinates provoked the revolt of various groups of Indians. The most notable of these occurred in 1661, when the Indians of Tehuantepec, led by the mayor, Juan Arellano, rose in rebellion. They were pacified by the intervention and mediation of the bishop of Oaxaca, Alonso Cuevas Dávalos.


title introducing

of the city is divided into fifteen neighborhoods called barrios, each of which has its own church. Each of these churches have their own patron saint, which is celebrated each year during an event called a “vela.” Velas are celebrations of pre Hispanic origin which occur in each


nearby volcanic

is located on a large hill called Guiengola, Gola, Gui’ngola or Guien-Gola. It and a nearby volcanic cone were fortified with walls, trenches and towers on the slopes. On the summit, terraces, bases, pyramids and temples were constructed with slabs of stone covered in stucco. The fortress city also had pens of deer and wild boar as well as artificial ponds with fish to act as food reserves. The area is filled with small ravines, which makes access more difficult. The fortifications served


poor program

” (Choice for the Poor) program which he heads would remain intact after he hands his resignation to the Vatican. In the “Church of the People” the offering consist of food and gifts brought by hundreds of indigenous. The bishop’s sermons often contained references to those “excluded from the system,” “community cooperatives” and “human rights.” The current bishop of Tehuantepec is Oscar Armando Campos Cantreras.


local products

, sesame seed, melons, cucumbers, squash, peanuts and flowers. Livestock includes cattle, pigs and goats. The Union of Indigenous Communities of the Isthmus Region, a cooperative founded in 1982, assists in production and distribution of the local products, notably coffee, under a fair trade label.

is the '''Parroquia de San Vicente Ferrer''' (Parish of San Vicente Ferrer) which dates from the 17th century. To the west of the Palacio is a large market where local products can be seen and a local variant of the Zapotec (Zapotec language) language can be heard.


188

of Santo Domingo Tehuantepec (Tehuantepec) in the state of Oaxaca, which in turn comes from the Nahuatl (Nahuatl language) ''tecuani-tepec'' ("jaguar hill (Jaguars in Mesoamerican culture)"). *188 (Mexican Federal Highway 188): Haltunchén, CAM - San Antonio Cayal, CAM *190 (Mexican Federal Highway 190): Puebla (Puebla, Puebla), PUE - Huajuapan de León, OAX - Oaxaca (Oaxaca, Oaxaca), OAX - Tehuantepec, OAX - La Ventosa, OAX - Tapanatepec, OAX

Tehuantepec

'''Tehuantepec''' (in full, '''Santo Domingo Tehuantepec''') is a city and municipality (municipalities of Mexico) in the southeast of the Mexican (Mexico) state (States of Mexico) of Oaxaca. It is part of the Tehuantepec District (Tehuantepec District, Oaxaca) in the west of the Istmo Region (Istmo de Tehuantepec, Oaxaca). The area was important in pre Hispanic period as part of a trade route that connected Central America with what is now the center of Mexico. Later it became a secondary capital of the Zapotec dominion (Zapotec civilization), before it was conquered by the Spanish in the early 16th century.

The city is still the center of Zapotec culture (Zapotec peoples) in the Isthmus of Tehuantepec and is the second largest in the region. The city is known for its women and their traditional dress, which was adopted by Frida Kahlo. Tehuantepec has a reputation for being a “matriarchal society.” Women do dominate the local markets and are known to taunt men. However, political power is still the domain of men. The city experienced a short economic boom in the early 20th century related to a rail line that was built linking the two oceans, but it was soon eclipsed by the Panama Canal. There have been plans to resurrect the line linking the Gulf of Mexico and Pacific Ocean but financing has been a problem.

Search by keywords:


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017