Taylor, British Columbia

What is Taylor, British Columbia known for?


natural

in 1980, which controlled the level and flow of the Peace River, making navigation and flood control much easier. Following the construction of a natural gas processing plant by Westcoast Energy in 1985, Fibreco Pulp opened its sawmill in 1988, and the Village was re-incorporated into the District of Taylor in 1989. Despite the closure of the Petro-Canada refinery in 1991, economic growth continued throughout the decade as Westcoast Energy's McMahon Gas Plant expanded in 1991 and added

a cogeneration plant in 1993. Fibreco Pulp doubled its capacity in 1996, the Younger Natural Gas Liquids Extraction Plant (to extract water and sulphur from natural gas) was expanded in 1996, and the Taylor Straddle plant (to extract ethane from natural gas) was built in 1997.Since 1993, the town of 1,373 residents have built a new hockey arena, leisure skating arena, curling rink, and an 18 hole golf course. Strong community pride also developed as demonstrated by the town placing first at the provincial

the Taylor Medical Clinic. Economy thumb 250px Spectra Energy Aerial: District of Taylor (File:Spectra Energy.JPG) For a town of 1,373 people, Taylor has a very large industrial base and calls itself "Where Peace and Prosperity Meet." Industrial plants include the Westcoast Energy's (Duke Energy) McMahon plant for natural gas processing with sulfur recovery and cogeneration, two straddle plants which extract ethane and other impurities from liquid natural gas


quot annual

-color:lavender" Time Precipitation - - style "text-align:center;background-color:#ffffff" January 26 mm (1.0 in) - style "text-align:center;background-color:#ffffff" July 80 mm (3.1 in) - style "text-align:center;background-color:#ffffff" Annual 321 mm (12.6 in) - style "text-align:center;background-color:lavender" colspan "2" Annual snowfall: 135 cm (53.0


local projects

level, in its small category, in the parks and gardens-oriented Communities in Bloom Competition in 1997 and second in the national competition in 1998. District of Taylor (October 24, 2014), ''History 1960 to Present''. Other local projects have included building a memorial garden and cenotaph in 2000 dedicated to the 341st Engineers of the U.S


years style

Canada (October 23, 2014), ''2011 Community Profiles''. - style "text-align:center;background-color:#ffebad;" Taylor British Columbia - style "text-align:center;" Median age 30.7 years 41.9 years

- style "text-align:center;" Under 15 years old 22.9% 15.4% - style "text-align:center;" Over 65 years old 6.2% 15.7% - style "text-align:center;" Visible minority 1.4% 27.3% - style "text-align:center;" Protestant 50.0% 44.6% - style "text-align:center;" No religious affiliation 50.0% 44.1% Image:Taylor, BC population.png thumb right Population trend 1976–2006, BC Stats. BC Stats (October 24, 2014), http


made sense

small cities (like, Taylor (Taylor, British Columbia)) that I just could not find elsewhere. This will really help. Concerning the footnote style: it was something that made sense in the beginning, but it just kept on growing and growing. I'm going to have to turn them into plain old references and merge(?) the notes. --maclean25 (User:Maclean25) 01:02, 12 November 2005 (UTC) That being said, I think it has a spark that I haven't seen in other small towns, and i'm looking for ideas on how to make a small town into an FA, with this one as the test case. So far, I believe that all the municipal area FAs are all large cities, content length may be a factor holding back small towns, regardless of how good they are. Karmafist (User:Karmafist) 20:55, 22 November 2005 (UTC) *I have been experimenting in small town articles, too. My works in progress include Dawson Creek, British Columbia (pop 10,000), Chetwynd (Chetwynd, British Columbia) (pop. 3,000), Taylor (Taylor, British Columbia) (pop. 1,300), and Hudson's Hope (Hudson's Hope, British Columbia) (pop. 1,150). As you can see they are all in different stages of development. They follow the same structure which was based on some of the better FAs on other cities. I have found that the best resource for these have been the local historical associations. Personal knowledge of the town has also been invaluable. --maclean25 (User:Maclean25) 04:40, 23 November 2005 (UTC) right thumb (Image:WestCoast_pipeline.png) '''Westcoast Pipeline''' is a natural gas pipeline in British Columbia that brings natural gas to the United States and to TransCanada pipeline. Built in 1957 by Frank McMahon's (Frank M. McMahon) Westcoast Transmission Co. Ltd., the 650-mile gas pipeline from Taylor (Taylor, British Columbia) in north-eastern British Columbia to the United States was Canada's first "big-inch (Big Inch)" pipeline. It is located on the banks of the Peace River (Peace River (Canada)), at the confluence with Kiskatinaw River, downstream from Taylor (Taylor, British Columbia). It is in the Boreal White and Black Spruce biogeoclimatic zone within the Peace Lowlands ecosection. It is used by ungulates as a winter range and by migratory waterfowl as a staging area.


events+annual

, by agricultural fields, and a community forest, is the 4.2 km ParticipACTION Trail. In the winter the golf course and its trails are used for cross-country skiing, snowshoeing and other winter activities. Since 2004 the District has operated Peace Island Park with its boat launch, campsites, and facilities for recreational outdoor events. Annual events in the community include a conformation dog show in May, and the Invitational Class 'A' Gold Panning Championships in the summer, among others. The gold panning (Placer mining) competition is a three-day event that has been held in Taylor annually since 1972 and includes advanced and amateur competitions, a parade and other community-wide events. District of Taylor. Events: Gold Panning Also, to preserve its heritage (Cultural heritage), several pioneer log houses, such as the Information Centre, where a replica of Alexander Mackenzie's birch bark canoe is displayed, and Peace Island Park meeting hall, have been restored and are used today. In 2010 11 the town was featured on the CBC (CBC Television) documentary series ''Village on a Diet''. The '''Peace River Regional District''' is a regional district in northeastern British Columbia, Canada. The regional district comprises seven municipalities and four electoral areas. Its member municipalities are the cities of Fort St. John (Fort St. John, British Columbia) and Dawson Creek (Dawson Creek, British Columbia), the district municipalities (district municipality) of Tumbler Ridge (Tumbler Ridge, British Columbia), Chetwynd (Chetwynd, British Columbia), Taylor (Taylor, British Columbia), and Hudson's Hope (Hudson's Hope, British Columbia), and the village of Pouce Coupe (Pouce Coupe, British Columbia). Peace River also has four regional district electoral areas: B (Peace River B, British Columbia), C (Peace River C, British Columbia), D (Peace River D, British Columbia) and E (Peace River E, British Columbia), six Indian reserves, and one Indian settlement. The district's administrative centre is in Dawson Creek. '''South:''' Peace River E (Peace River E, British Columbia), Taylor (Taylor, British Columbia), Peace River D (Peace River D, British Columbia) '''North:''' Taylor (Taylor, British Columbia), Peace River C (Peace River C, British Columbia), Peace River B (Peace River B, British Columbia) *Pretty good comprehensive article. I'd like to try doing some copyediting, especially on the introduction and the first para of the history (too many "settlements" :-) ) but life is interfering with Wikipedia so I won't get to it until next week. I find the footnotes interfere with the text and most could be incorporated in it as they are not references. Like I said, I'll take a gander at it next week. You might want to include some climate data from See Dawson City for an example of what I did. 207.189.233.198 (User:207.189.233.198) 21:16, 10 November 2005 (UTC) Somehow, I was logged off. It's me: Luigizanasi (User:Luigizanasi) 21:17, 10 November 2005 (UTC) **Luigizanasi, where do you find those wonderful sources? I noticed that website has climate data on other small cities (like, Taylor (Taylor, British Columbia)) that I just could not find elsewhere. This will really help. Concerning the footnote style: it was something that made sense in the beginning, but it just kept on growing and growing. I'm going to have to turn them into plain old references and merge(?) the notes. --maclean25 (User:Maclean25) 01:02, 12 November 2005 (UTC) That being said, I think it has a spark that I haven't seen in other small towns, and i'm looking for ideas on how to make a small town into an FA, with this one as the test case. So far, I believe that all the municipal area FAs are all large cities, content length may be a factor holding back small towns, regardless of how good they are. Karmafist (User:Karmafist) 20:55, 22 November 2005 (UTC) *I have been experimenting in small town articles, too. My works in progress include Dawson Creek, British Columbia (pop 10,000), Chetwynd (Chetwynd, British Columbia) (pop. 3,000), Taylor (Taylor, British Columbia) (pop. 1,300), and Hudson's Hope (Hudson's Hope, British Columbia) (pop. 1,150). As you can see they are all in different stages of development. They follow the same structure which was based on some of the better FAs on other cities. I have found that the best resource for these have been the local historical associations. Personal knowledge of the town has also been invaluable. --maclean25 (User:Maclean25) 04:40, 23 November 2005 (UTC) right thumb (Image:WestCoast_pipeline.png) '''Westcoast Pipeline''' is a natural gas pipeline in British Columbia that brings natural gas to the United States and to TransCanada pipeline. Built in 1957 by Frank McMahon's (Frank M. McMahon) Westcoast Transmission Co. Ltd., the 650-mile gas pipeline from Taylor (Taylor, British Columbia) in north-eastern British Columbia to the United States was Canada's first "big-inch (Big Inch)" pipeline. It is located on the banks of the Peace River (Peace River (Canada)), at the confluence with Kiskatinaw River, downstream from Taylor (Taylor, British Columbia). It is in the Boreal White and Black Spruce biogeoclimatic zone within the Peace Lowlands ecosection. It is used by ungulates as a winter range and by migratory waterfowl as a staging area.


personal knowledge

Taylor (pop. 1,300), and Hudson's Hope (Hudson's Hope, British Columbia) (pop. 1,150). As you can see they are all in different stages of development. They follow the same structure which was based on some of the better FAs on other cities. I have found that the best resource for these have been the local historical associations. Personal knowledge of the town has also been invaluable. --maclean25 (User:Maclean25) 04:40, 23 November 2005 (UTC) right thumb (Image:WestCoast_pipeline.png) '''Westcoast Pipeline''' is a natural gas pipeline in British Columbia that brings natural gas to the United States and to TransCanada pipeline. Built in 1957 by Frank McMahon's (Frank M. McMahon) Westcoast Transmission Co. Ltd., the 650-mile gas pipeline from Taylor (Taylor, British Columbia) in north-eastern British Columbia to the United States was Canada's first "big-inch (Big Inch)" pipeline. It is located on the banks of the Peace River (Peace River (Canada)), at the confluence with Kiskatinaw River, downstream from Taylor (Taylor, British Columbia). It is in the Boreal White and Black Spruce biogeoclimatic zone within the Peace Lowlands ecosection. It is used by ungulates as a winter range and by migratory waterfowl as a staging area.


time year

Time year-round. Transportation and infrastructure Taylor's transportation network is dominated by the two-lane Alaska Highway (Highway 97 (British Columbia Highway 97)) which runs north-south through the middle of community and provides the only highway entrance and exit to the town. Cherry Avenue East is a rural road transportation route that travels through Baldonnel to Fort St. John. Intersections along the highway give access to frontage roads lined with businesses


local historical

Taylor (pop. 1,300), and Hudson's Hope (Hudson's Hope, British Columbia) (pop. 1,150). As you can see they are all in different stages of development. They follow the same structure which was based on some of the better FAs on other cities. I have found that the best resource for these have been the local historical associations. Personal knowledge of the town has also been invaluable. --maclean25 (User:Maclean25) 04:40, 23 November 2005 (UTC) Image:WestCoast_pipeline.png right thumb


documentary series

a replica of Alexander Mackenzie's birch bark canoe is displayed, and Peace Island Park meeting hall, have been restored and are used today. In 2010 11 the town was featured on the CBC (CBC Television) documentary series ''Village on a Diet''. The '''Peace River Regional District''' is a regional district in northeastern British Columbia, Canada. The regional district comprises seven municipalities and four electoral areas. Its member municipalities are the cities of Fort St. John (Fort St. John, British Columbia) and Dawson Creek (Dawson Creek, British Columbia), the district municipalities (district municipality) of Tumbler Ridge (Tumbler Ridge, British Columbia), Chetwynd (Chetwynd, British Columbia), Taylor (Taylor, British Columbia), and Hudson's Hope (Hudson's Hope, British Columbia), and the village of Pouce Coupe (Pouce Coupe, British Columbia). Peace River also has four regional district electoral areas: B (Peace River B, British Columbia), C (Peace River C, British Columbia), D (Peace River D, British Columbia) and E (Peace River E, British Columbia), six Indian reserves, and one Indian settlement. The district's administrative centre is in Dawson Creek. '''South:''' Peace River E (Peace River E, British Columbia), Taylor (Taylor, British Columbia), Peace River D (Peace River D, British Columbia) '''North:''' Taylor (Taylor, British Columbia), Peace River C (Peace River C, British Columbia), Peace River B (Peace River B, British Columbia) *Pretty good comprehensive article. I'd like to try doing some copyediting, especially on the introduction and the first para of the history (too many "settlements" :-) ) but life is interfering with Wikipedia so I won't get to it until next week. I find the footnotes interfere with the text and most could be incorporated in it as they are not references. Like I said, I'll take a gander at it next week. You might want to include some climate data from See Dawson City for an example of what I did. 207.189.233.198 (User:207.189.233.198) 21:16, 10 November 2005 (UTC) Somehow, I was logged off. It's me: Luigizanasi (User:Luigizanasi) 21:17, 10 November 2005 (UTC) **Luigizanasi, where do you find those wonderful sources? I noticed that website has climate data on other small cities (like, Taylor (Taylor, British Columbia)) that I just could not find elsewhere. This will really help. Concerning the footnote style: it was something that made sense in the beginning, but it just kept on growing and growing. I'm going to have to turn them into plain old references and merge(?) the notes. --maclean25 (User:Maclean25) 01:02, 12 November 2005 (UTC) That being said, I think it has a spark that I haven't seen in other small towns, and i'm looking for ideas on how to make a small town into an FA, with this one as the test case. So far, I believe that all the municipal area FAs are all large cities, content length may be a factor holding back small towns, regardless of how good they are. Karmafist (User:Karmafist) 20:55, 22 November 2005 (UTC) *I have been experimenting in small town articles, too. My works in progress include Dawson Creek, British Columbia (pop 10,000), Chetwynd (Chetwynd, British Columbia) (pop. 3,000), Taylor (Taylor, British Columbia) (pop. 1,300), and Hudson's Hope (Hudson's Hope, British Columbia) (pop. 1,150). As you can see they are all in different stages of development. They follow the same structure which was based on some of the better FAs on other cities. I have found that the best resource for these have been the local historical associations. Personal knowledge of the town has also been invaluable. --maclean25 (User:Maclean25) 04:40, 23 November 2005 (UTC) right thumb (Image:WestCoast_pipeline.png) '''Westcoast Pipeline''' is a natural gas pipeline in British Columbia that brings natural gas to the United States and to TransCanada pipeline. Built in 1957 by Frank McMahon's (Frank M. McMahon) Westcoast Transmission Co. Ltd., the 650-mile gas pipeline from Taylor (Taylor, British Columbia) in north-eastern British Columbia to the United States was Canada's first "big-inch (Big Inch)" pipeline. It is located on the banks of the Peace River (Peace River (Canada)), at the confluence with Kiskatinaw River, downstream from Taylor (Taylor, British Columbia). It is in the Boreal White and Black Spruce biogeoclimatic zone within the Peace Lowlands ecosection. It is used by ungulates as a winter range and by migratory waterfowl as a staging area.

Taylor, British Columbia

The '''District of Taylor''' is a small town in northeastern British Columbia, Canada, located on mile 36 of the Alaska Highway. Taylor, a member municipality of the Peace River Regional District (Peace River Regional District, British Columbia), covers an area of about 17.09 km² with 1,373 residents. Stats Canada (October 23, 2014), ''Census Profile''. As it is just south of the much larger city of Fort St. John, British Columbia Fort St. John , there is a sizable amount of commuting and interaction between the two.

The town sits on a terrace (Terrace (geology)) 60 m above the north bank of the Peace River (Peace River (Canada)). The first settler on the flat was a trapper named Herbert Taylor in 1911. The town incorporated in 1958 with industrial business beginning to locate there. Since then, Taylor has remained a small town, even though it has developed a large industrial base. It has become home to the annual World's Invitational Class 'A' Gold Panning Championships and was featured on the CBC Television program ''Village on a Diet''.

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