Tangier

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by the Germans near Arras and spent the rest of the war in a prisoner-of-war camp in Karlsruhe. He went on to a career as a successful author, although never as successful or innovative as his younger brother. He lived much of his life overseas, in exotic places such as Tangier – a lifestyle made possible by his second marriage, to a rich Australian (Joan Chirnside). His work, possibly in consequence, tends to be reminiscent of Somerset Maugham, although without Maugham's huge popular success


modern music

oasis in a three-year campaign. John IV was a beloved monarch, a patron of fine art and music, and a proficient composer and writer on musical subjects. He collected one of the largest libraries in the world. (Madeira & Aguiar, 2003) Among his writings is a defense of Palestrina (Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina) and a Defense of Modern Music (Lisbon, 1649). Abroad, the Dutch took Malacca (January 1641) and the Sultan

Pierluigi da Palestrina Palestrina and a Defense of Modern Music (Lisbon, 1649). Abroad, the Dutch took Malacca (January 1641) and the Sultan of Oman captured Muscat (Muscat, Oman) (1648). By 1654, however, most of Brazil was back in Portuguese hands and had effectively ceased to be a viable Dutch colony. John died in 1656, and his widow, Luisa of Guzman, married their daughter Catherine of Braganza to Charles II of England in 1661 while she was regent for their son Afonso VI. Her


long poem

of the town, to Agadir, where the waters passed over the walls, killing many. The tsunami also reached Cornwall, in the present United Kingdom, at a height of three metres. Along the coast of Cornwall, the sea rose rapidly in vast waves, and then ebbed equally rapidly. A two metre tsunami also hit Galway in Ireland, and did some considerable damage to the Spanish Arch section of the city wall. Voltaire wrote a long poem, ''Poême sur le désastre de Lisbonne'', shortly after


history natural

commentary), the US Marine Corps actually shows this scene to its advanced infantry classes for midshipmen at the United States Naval Academy. '''Cristóbal Acosta''' ( Huelva, 1594), was a Portuguese (Portugal) doctor (Physician) and natural historian (natural history). He is considered a pioneer in the study of plants from the Orient, especially their use in pharmacology. Together with the apothecary


historical presence

, due to the historical presence of many civilizations and cultures starting from before the 5th century BCE. Between the period of being a strategic Berber (Berber people) town and then a Phoenician trading center to the independence era around the 1950s, Tangier was a refuge for many cultures. In 1923, Tangier was considered as having international status (International city) by foreign colonial powers, and became a destination for many European and American diplomats, spies, writers


paintings quot

of for themselves—with varying results. Matisse made several sojourns in Tangier, always staying at the Grand Hotel Villa de France. "I have found landscapes in Morocco," he claimed, "exactly as they are described in Delacroix's paintings." The Californian artist Richard Diebenkorn was directly influenced by the haunting colors and rhythmic patterns of Matisse's Morocco paintings. Antonio Fuentes was born in Tangier in 1905 from a Spanish family. An article in La


year campaign

oasis in a three-year campaign. John IV was a beloved monarch, a patron of fine art and music, and a proficient composer and writer on musical subjects. He collected one of the largest libraries in the world. (Madeira & Aguiar, 2003) Among his writings is a defense of Palestrina (Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina) and a Defense of Modern Music (Lisbon, 1649). Abroad, the Dutch took Malacca (January 1641) and the Sultan


independent feature

the Los Angeles area at The Gig, The Mint (The Mint (nightclub)) and The Rainbow and other acoustic venues such as Genghis Cohen, Tangier and The Derby. She played at the Indiegrrl festival in the Blue Ridge Mountains, VA last year and remains an avid supporter of women in music. She was on a compilation CD last year of women around the world called Females On FIre. She has also written and sang songs for several independent feature films and starred in the short film Facing The Lion. She is currently working with writer director and established editor Joe Plonsky and will be starring and performing her music in the Sci Fi trilogy called "Vex". Scandal On returning from one of his cable-laying expeditions, Varley found that his wife, Ellen ''née'' Rouse, had abandoned him for Ion Perdicaris. Married since 1855, the couple were divorced in 1873 and Ellen and Perdicaris emigrated to Tangier where the family subsequently became embroiled in the Perdicaris incident. In 1877, Varley married Heleanor Jessie. Perdicaris later moved to Tangier, where he built a house known as the ''Place of Nightingales'' and filled it with exotic animals. In 1871, Perdicaris met Ellen Varley, wife of the eminent telegraph engineer C.F. Varley in Malvern (Malvern, Worcestershire), England. Varley was away on a cable-laying expedition and Ellen abandoned him for Perdicaris. The Varleys divorced in 1873 and Ellen settled in Tangier with Perdicaris and her two sons and two daughters. Fascinated by Moroccan culture, Perdicaris wrote several books (few of them published to a wide audience) on Morocco, and became the unofficial head of Tangier's foreign community. He maintained business interests in England and the United States and frequently visited New York. *1660 - On the restoration of Charles II (Charles II of England) in Britain, the Queen-Regent re-negotiates the treaty of 1654. Portugal is allowed to recruit soldiers and horses in England for the fight against Spain; and to seek out 4,000 fighting men in Scotland and Ireland and charter 24 English ships to carry them. The expeditionary force is to be issued with English weapons on arrival in Portugal and guaranteed religious freedom of worship. *1661 - Catarina da Bragança (Catherine of Braganza), sister of Afonso VI, marries Charles II of Great Britain on 31 May. She brings to London a dowry of 2,000,000 gold pieces, the practice of drinking afternoon tea, and England is given colonial toe-holds in the Portuguese Empire at Tangier and Bombay. Servicing the wedding debt burdens the Portuguese exchequer for the next half-century, and this marriage with a Protestant monarch is deeply unpopular with that section of the Portuguese nobility which favours alliance with France. *1662 - In a palace coup d’etat in Lisbon a restive younger faction of the nobility, supported by the young Afonso VI, overthrows the Queen Regent and installs the 26-year-old Count of Castelo Melhor as ‘dictator’ to prosecute the war with Spain. The adolescent (and possibly retarded) king is married to a French princess and the young dictator models his government on the royal absolutism of the Bourbon dynasty. Opposition to this pro-French absolutism (from the King’s sister the Queen of England, and his younger brother Prince Pedro) is swept aside, and Castelo Melhor initiates the final, successful phase of the Portuguese war of restoration with the aid of the Franco-German Marshal Schomberg (Frederick Schomberg, 1st Duke of Schomberg), who brilliantly commands an international mercenary army against the Spanish forces. Naval career Byng was born at Wrotham, Kent, England. In 1678, he entered the Royal Navy as a King's Letter Boy (Volunteer-per-order). He left the navy for a brief time to join an army garrison stationed at Tangier, but in 1683 Byng rejoined the navy as a lieutenant, and shipped for the East Indies. In 1688 he was instrumental in instigating the Royal Navy to switch allegiance to William III (William III of England), Prince of Orange. This naval force took part in the Glorious Revolution of 1688, and William was installed as King of England, thus insuring Byng's rapid rise in rank and fortune. caption Courtyard of the Legation location Tangier, Morocco lat_degrees 35 The '''Tangier American Legation''' is a building in the medina (Medina quarter) of Tangier, Morocco. The first American public property outside of the United States, it commemorates the historic cultural and diplomatic relations (Morocco–United States relations) between the United States and the Kingdom of Morocco (Morocco). It is now officially called the Tangier American Legation Institute for Moroccan Studies, and is a cultural center, museum, and a research library, concentrating on Arabic language studies. Reign of terror, 2004–06 The Crane patriarch's reign of terror over Harmony's citizens truly begins on September 27, 2004, when viewers glimpse Alistair's face for the first time. Alistair takes great joy in tormenting his newly-returned wife and eventually sends Katherine to a Crane compound in the North Atlantic in early 2005; there, he holds Katherine, along with stowaways Gwen (Gwen Winthrop) and Jane Winthrop and would-be rescuer grandson Fox Crane, captive, and both rapes Katherine and physically assaults Gwen. Later, when DNA testing proves Sheridan, and not Beth, to be Marty's biological mother, Alistair assists Beth, who is revealed to be the product of his one-night stand with former Harmony harlot Edna Wallace, in escaping the country with his grandson. Sheridan is furious with Luis for refusing to believe her unfounded claims about Marty's maternity, and Luis sets off to find Marty on his own. While he is in Tangier, Alistair has Luis attacked and kidnapped, and holds him prisoner in the same Hawaiian compound that he had once used to house Rachel (Crane family#Rachel Barrett); Alistair then fakes Luis's death in October 2005. In August 1437, the Portuguese expeditionary force, under Henry's leadership, set out to seize Tangier. Ferdinand brought his household and Aviz knights with him. The campaign proved disastrous. Henry impetuously launched a series of assaults on the walls of Tangier with no success, while allowing his siege camp to be encircled by a Moroccan army rushed north by the Wattasid strongman Abu Zakariya Yahya al-Wattasi, governor of the Marinid palace of Fez (Fes, Morocco) (called ''Lazeraque'' by the Portuguese chroniclers). Unable to break out, the Portuguese expeditionary force was starved into submission. To preserve his army from destruction, Henry signed a treaty with the Moroccan ruler, agreeing to restore Ceuta (which had been captured by the Portuguese in 1415), in return for being allowed to withdraw his army unmolested. Henry handed his brother Infante Ferdinand over to the Moroccans as a hostage until the fulfillment of the treaty. Ferdinand was placed under house arrest first in Asilah, then later moved to Fez (Fez, Morocco). From a young age, Joan expressed a desire to become a nun; however, as she was second-in-line to the throne, her father did not allow it. During his military expedition to Tangier in 1471, Joan served as Regent of the Portuguese Kingdom (Portuguese Empire). After vehemently refusing several proposals of marriage, Joan joined the Dominican (Dominican order) Convent of Jesus in Aveiro (Aveiro, Portugal) in 1475. Her brother had, by then, been given an heir, so the family line was no longer in danger of extinction. Still, she was compelled several times to leave the convent and return to the court. She turned down an offer of marriage from Charles VII of France, 18 years her junior. In 1485, she received another offer, from the recently-widowed Richard III of England, who was only 8 months younger. This was to be part of a double marital alliance, with his niece Elizabeth of York marrying her cousin, the future Manuel I (Manuel I of Portugal). However, his death in battle, of which Joan allegedly had a prophetic dream, halted these plans. Joan never formally professed (Profession (religious)) as a nun. She continued to be a great supporter of her brother, John II of Portugal, throughout his reign and her life. '''Mohamed Hamri''' (August 27, 1932 WikiPedia:Tangier Commons:Category:Tangier Dmoz:Regional Africa Morocco Localities Tanger


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WikiPedia:Tangier Commons:Category:Tangier Dmoz:Regional Africa Morocco Localities Tanger


modern business

and businessmen. The city is currently undergoing rapid development and modernization. Projects include new tourism projects along the bay, a modern business district called Tangier City Center, a new airport terminal and a new football stadium. Tangier's economy is also set to benefit greatly from the new Tanger-Med port. History Tangier was founded by Carthaginian (Carthage) colonists in the early 5th century BC, on a former small Berbers berber

Tangier

'''Tangier''' ( ; the major English (English (language))-language dictionaries also accept the spelling ''Tangiers'') in is a major city in northern Morocco with a population of about 850,000 (2014 estimates). It is located on the North African coast at the western entrance to the Strait of Gibraltar where the Mediterranean Sea meets the Atlantic Ocean off Cape Spartel. It is the capital of the Tangier-Tetouan Region and of the Tangier-Asilah prefecture of Morocco.

The history of Tangier is very rich, due to the historical presence of many civilizations and cultures starting from before the 5th century BCE. Between the period of being a strategic Berber (Berber people) town and then a Phoenician trading center to the independence era around the 1950s, Tangier was a refuge for many cultures. In 1923, Tangier was considered as having international status (International city) by foreign colonial powers, and became a destination for many European and American diplomats, spies, writers and businessmen.

The city is currently undergoing rapid development and modernization. Projects include new tourism projects along the bay, a modern business district called Tangier City Center, a new airport terminal and a new football stadium. Tangier's economy is also set to benefit greatly from the new Tanger-Med port.

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