Taiyuan

What is Taiyuan known for?


historical architecture

of well laid out exhibition halls. Permanent exhibits include those devoted to relics from the Paleolithic and Neolithic ages, ancient Chinese porcelain, painting and calligraphy, jades, bronzes, Chinese currency, historical architecture, Buddhist stone scultptures, and Shanxi merchants. Signage in Chinese and English. directions "Bus 1 then walk" *


quot reporting

. Thompson, "Reporting the Taiyuan Massacre: Culture and Politics in the China War of 1900," in Robert A. Bickers and R. G. Tiedemann, ed., ''The Boxers, China, and the World'' (Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2007): 65-92. Thompson points out that the widely circulated accounts were by people who could not have seen the and that these accounts closely followed (often word for word) well known earlier martyr literature. Image:Buddhist paintings Yungang.jpg


music story

price content Comprises halls for opera, folk music, story telling and disco. Stages both modern and traditional performances. Festivals * WikiPedia:Taiyuan


family providing

), whilst holding appointments in both Hedong and Taiyuan, Li stayed in the Wu household many times and became close to the Wu family. After Li Yuan overthrew Emperor Yang, he was generous to the Wu family, providing them with money, grain, land and clothing. Once the Tang Dynasty became established, Wu Shihou held a succession of senior ministerial posts including governor of Yangzhou, Lizhou and Jingzhou (荊州) (modern day Jiangling County, Hubei Province). ! 晉 晋 Táng (Taiyuan) (唐), renamed Jìnyáng (晉陽 晋陽) Qǔwò (Quwo County) (曲沃) Jiàng (Yicheng County) (絳 绛) also known as Yì (翼) Xīntián (Houma, Shanxi) (新田), renamed Xīnjiàng (新絳 新绛) 11th century BC Taiyuan, China WikiPedia:Taiyuan


linfen

, Linfen, and Yuncheng (Yuncheng, Shanxi). Thirty-one counties lie in its track. established 1951 city Taiyuan, Shanxi country China - Shanxi 山西 Shānxī 晋 jìn Taiyuan 太原 Tàiyuán List of county-level divisions (List of administrative divisions of Shanxi) '''Shanxi Zhongyu Brave Dragons (Shanxi Zhongyu)''' Taiyuan, Shanxi Riverside Sports Arena - Guan Jing 關靖 Shiqi 士起 Unknown 199 Taiyuan (present

, and then south through the central valley of Shanxi before turning west to join the Yellow River west of Hejin. The Fen and the Wei Rivers are the two largest tributaries of the Yellow River. The river is 694 km long and drains an area of 39,417 km 2 , 25.3% of the area of Shanxi Province. Modern Modern cities on or near the Fen from north to south are: Taiyuan, Linfen, Houma (Houma, Shanxi), Hejin. In 1990s

) is a prefecture-level city in the west of Shanxi province, People's Republic of China, bordering Shaanxi province to the west, Jinzhong and the provincial capital of Taiyuan to the east, Linfen to the south, and Xinzhou to the north. It has a total area of 21,000 square kilometers and total population of 3,600,000.


time keeping

, Shanxi), defeating all Former Yan resistance on the way. He then captured Jinyang (晉陽, in modern Taiyuan, Shanxi). Murong Ping led a 300,000-men strong force against Wang, but apprehensive of Wang, he stopped at Lu River (潞川, in modern Changzhi as well). Wang soon arrived to prepare to face off against him. Meanwhile, Murong Ping made the worst display of his corruption at this time -- keeping guards at forests and streams, disallowing commoners and even his own soldiers from cutting firewood or fishing unless they paid a usage fee in either money or silk. He soon had a stash of wealth, but completely lost the morale of his soldiers. Murong Wei, hearing this, sent a messenger to rebuke him and ordering him to distribute the wealth to the soldiers, but the damage was done. In winter 370, the armies engaged, and despite the numerical advantage that Murong Ping had, Wang crushed him, and Murong Ping fled back to the Former Yan capital Yecheng by himself. Murong Wei abandoned Yecheng and tried to flee to the old capital Helong (和龍, in modern Jinzhou, Liaoning), but was captured on the way. Fu Jiān pardoned him but had him formally surrender with his officials, ending Former Yan. Jin is spoken over most of Shanxi province, except for the lower Fen River valley; much of central Inner Mongolia; as well as adjoining areas in Hebei, Henan, and Shaanxi provinces. Cities covered within this area include Taiyuan, Zhangjiakou, Hohhot, Jiaozuo, and Yulin (Yulin, Shaanxi). In total Jin is spoken by roughly 45 million people. '''Yuan''' (袁 (wikt:袁), WikiPedia:Taiyuan


made+technical

;ref name "tokyo" In 1980, the investigation ended and he was sent to Taiyuan, Shanxi to work as a coach of the provincial table tennis team, which made technical progress in leaps and bounds under the coaching of Zhuang. Early career Hao Zhao was born in an obscure family in Taiyuan, and joined the army at a young age. Described as masculine and strong, the physically adept Hao Zhao was soon assigned the post of a commander to a group of militia under the Han Dynasty's chancellor (Chancellor (China)), Cao Cao. He gained several deeds during his tenure as a captain, and was granted the lowest ranking of generalship for his diligent effort. Some time later, he was dispatched to Hexi and stayed there for roughly ten years. During his tenure, he had been successful on suppressing some local uprisings, and was feared by both the residents and foreign tribes alike. (昭字伯道,太原人,为人雄壮,少入军为部曲督,数有战功,为杂号将军,遂镇守河西十余年,民夷畏服。). ''Brief History of Wei''. Yu Huan. As Princess of Qin and crown princess In 617, Li Yuan, aided by Li Shimin and his older brother Li Jiancheng, among others, rebelled at Taiyuan (太原, in modern Taiyuan, Shanxi), and later that year captured the capital Chang'an, declaring Emperor Yang's grandson Yang You (Emperor Gong of Sui) the Prince of Dai emperor (as Emperor Gong). In 618, after news arrived that Emperor Yang had been killed in a coup at Jiangdu (江都, in modern Yangzhou, Jiangsu) led by the general Yuwen Huaji, Li Yuan had Emperor Gong yield the throne to him, thus establishing the Tang Dynasty. Li Yuan became the first Tang ruler, Emperor Gaozu. He appointed his son, Li Shimin, as the Prince of Qin, his wife as the Princess of Qin. The couple would eventually have three sons -- Li Chengqian, Li Tai, and Li Zhi (Emperor Gaozong of Tang) -- and at least three daughters, who were later named the Princesses Changle, Jinyang, and Xincheng. Early career Sima Yong was the grandson of Sima Fu Prince Xian of Anping, the younger brother of Sima Yi and granduncle to Jin Dynasty's founder, Emperor Wu (Emperor Wu of Jin). His father Sima Gui (司馬瑰) was the Prince of Taiyuan, and after his death, Sima Yong inherited his principality. In 276, he was sent to his principality (roughly modern Taiyuan, Shanxi), but in 277 his principality was moved to Hejian (河間, roughly modern Cangzhou, Hebei). He became known for his knack for finding capable associates, and when he visited Lthe capital Luoyang on an official visit, Emperor Wu became impressed by him and stated that he could be a good example to other princes. In 299, during the reign of Emperor Hui, he was put in charge of defending the important city of Chang'an -- a post which Emperor Wu had left instructions that only someone who was closely related to the emperor should be allowed to take, but which the high level officials found appropriate for Sima Yong due to his reputation. In fall 312, Han Zhao forces, under Liu Can and Liu Yao, dealt a serious blow to the Jin general Liu Kun (劉琨) the governor of Bing Province (Bing (province)) (并州, modern northern and central Shanxi), who had been a constant threat to Han Zhao, capturing Liu Kun's headquarters at Jinyang (晉陽, in modern Taiyuan, Shanxi) and killing Liu Kun's parents. While Liu Kun was able to recapture Jinyang with the assistance of the Xianbei chief Tuoba Yilu the Duke of Dai (State of Dai), he would not pose a serious threat to Han Zhao from that point on. The scattered references to the Di do not add up to a coherent history. According to legend the ancestors of Zhou dynasty lived among the Rong and Di until Gu Gong Danfu led then away to the mid-Wei River valley where they built their capital near Mount Qi (Qishan County) (before 1107BC). In 676-651 Duke Xian of Jin conquered a number of Rong and Di groups. In 662 the Di drove the Rong out of Taiyuan. In 662-659 the state of Xing was nearly destroyed by the Chi Di until it was rescued by Qi (Qi (Shandong)). In 660BC the Chi Di took the capital of Wey and killed its king, but were driven out by Qi. From 660 to 507 Jin fought many wars with the Di, destroying Chi Di state of Lu in 594, 'subjugating' them in 541 and being severely defeated by the Xianyu Di in 507. In 640 the Di were allied with Qi and Xing against Wey and in 636 the Di helped the Zhou king against the state of Cheng. In 531 Jin attacked the Xianyu and Fei. By about 400bc most of the Di and Rong had been eliminated as independent polities. Zhongshan was conquered by Wei in 406, regained its independence in 377 and was conquered by Zhou in 295. Circa 283-265 Tian Dan (ROCS Tian Dan (FFG-1110)) fought some Di who seem to have lived within the area of the Chinese states. * '''ZBYC''' (YCU) – Yuncheng Guangong Airport – Yuncheng, Shanxi * '''ZBYN''' (TYN) – Taiyuan Wusu International Airport – Taiyuan, Shanxi In spring 370, Wang first advanced on Luoyang and forced its surrender. He then advanced on Hu Pass (壺關, in modern Changzhi, Shanxi), defeating all Former Yan resistance on the way. He then captured Jinyang (晉陽, in modern Taiyuan, Shanxi). Murong Ping led a 300,000-men strong force against Wang, but apprehensive of Wang, he stopped at Lu River (潞川, in modern Changzhi as well). Wang soon arrived to prepare to face off against him. Meanwhile, Murong Ping made the worst display of his corruption at this time—keeping guards at forests and streams, disallowing commoners and even his own soldiers from cutting firewood or fishing unless they paid a usage fee in either money or silk. He soon had a stash of wealth, but completely lost the morale of his soldiers. Murong Wei, hearing this, sent a messenger to rebuke him and ordering him to distribute the wealth to the soldiers, but the damage was done. In winter 370, the armies engaged, and despite the numerical advantage that Murong Ping had, Wang crushed him, and Murong Ping fled back to Yecheng by himself. Murong Wei abandoned Yecheng and tried to flee to the old capital Helong (和龍, in modern Jinzhou, Liaoning), but was captured on the way. Fú Jiān pardoned him but had him formally surrender with his officials, ending Former Yan. In spring 370, Wang first advanced on Luoyang and forced its surrender. He then advanced on Hu Pass (壺關, in modern Changzhi, Shanxi), defeating all Former Yan resistance on the way. He then captured Jinyang (晉陽, in modern Taiyuan, Shanxi). Murong Ping led a 300,000-men strong force against Wang, but apprehensive of Wang, he stopped at Lu River (潞川, in modern Changzhi as well). Wang soon arrived to prepare to face off against him. Murong Wei became confident, however, that Wang would be defeated by sheer numbers, and did not appear concerned. In spring 370, Wang first advanced on Luoyang and forced its surrender. He then advanced on Hu Pass (壺關, in modern Changzhi, Shanxi), defeating all Former Yan resistance on the way. He then captured Jinyang (晉陽, in modern Taiyuan, Shanxi). Murong Ping led a 300,000-men strong force against Wang, but apprehensive of Wang, he stopped at Lu River (潞川, in modern Changzhi as well). Wang soon arrived to prepare to face off against him. Meanwhile, Murong Ping made the worst display of his corruption at this time—keeping guards at forests and streams, disallowing commoners and even his own soldiers from cutting firewood or fishing unless they paid a usage fee in either money or silk. He soon had a stash of wealth, but completely lost the morale of his soldiers. Murong Wei, hearing this, sent a messenger to rebuke him and ordering him to distribute the wealth to the soldiers, but the damage was done. In winter 370, the armies engaged, and despite the numerical advantage that Murong Ping had, Wang crushed him, and Murong Ping fled back to Yecheng by himself. Murong Wei abandoned Yecheng and tried to flee to Helong, but was captured on the way, ending Former Yan. Murong Ping fled to Goguryeo, which, however, arrested him and delivered him back to Former Qin. Fu Jiān pardoned him and made him an imperial assistant. In 372, Murong Chui told Fu Jiān that Murong Ping was the cause of Former Yan's destruction and should be killed; instead Fu Jiān effectively exiled Murong Ping by making him a governor of a remote commandery. This was the last historical record of him, and it is not known when or how he died. In 886, Emperor Xizong, who had returned to Chang'an after Huang's defeat, was again forced to flee Chang'an, to Xingyuan (興元, in modern Hanzhong, Shaanxi) after his trusted eunuch (eunuch (court official)) advisor Tian Lingzi got into a confrontation with the warlords Wang Chongrong the military governor of Huguo Circuit (護國, headquartered in modern Yuncheng, Shanxi) and Li Keyong the military governor of Hedong Circuit (河東, headquartered in modern Taiyuan, Shanxi) and was subsequently defeated by Wang Chongrong and Li Keyong. Two other warlords, Zhu Mei the military governor of Jingnan Circuit (靜難, headquartered in modern Xianyang) and Li Changfu the military governor of Fengxiang, who had previously been allied with Tian, turned against Emperor Xizong as well and supported his distant relative Li Yun the Prince of Xiang as a rival emperor at Chang'an. Zhu subsequently sent his general Wang Xingyu to advance on Xingyuan to try to capture Emperor Xizong, and Wang Xingyu initially defeated the imperial guard general Yang Sheng (楊晟). In response, Emperor Xizong sent Song, Li Chan (李鋋), and Chen Pei (陳佩) to station themselves at Mount Datang (大唐峰, in modern Hanzhong) to defend against Wang Xingyu. Wang Xingyu was unable to advance and later, after enticement by Tian's successor as the leading eunuch, Yang Fugong, turned against Zhu and killed him; Li Yun fled to Wang Chongrong's territory but was killed by Wang Chongrong. ''Zizhi Tongjian'', vol. 256 (:zh:s:資治通鑑 卷256). For Song's accomplishments, Emperor Xizong bestowed the imperial surname of Li (Li (李)) on him and gave him a new personal name of Maozhen ("prosperous and faithful") as well as a courtesy name of Zhengcheng ("rightful subject"). In spring 887, Emperor Xizong made him the military governor of Wuding Circuit (武定, headquartered in modern Hanzhong). Meanwhile, Li Maozhen and Han Quanhui sent out various calls for help in Emperor Zhaozong's name. A number of eunuchs that Han sent to southeastern circuits were intercepted and executed by Zhu's ally Feng Xingxi the military governor of Rongzhao Circuit (戎昭, i.e., Jinshang). Wang Jian, meanwhile, tried to play both sides, as he publicly denounced Li Maozhen and offered assistance to Zhu, while secretly sending messengers to Fengxiang to encourage Li Maozhen to hold out — yet sent his adoptive sons Wang Zongji (王宗佶) and Wang Zongbi (i.e., Hua Hong, whom Wang had adopted as a son by that point) toward Fengxiang, claiming to want to welcome the emperor to his realm, but instead was intending to capture Shannan West from Li Maozhen. Li Keyong did have his nephew Li Sizhao and officer Zhou Dewei launch an attack on Huguo, to try to divert Zhu's attention, but Zhu reacted by having his officer Shi Shucong (氏叔琮) and nephew Zhu Youning (朱友寧) make a major counterattack that reached all the way to Li Keyong's capital Taiyuan Municipality and had it under siege, with the situation being so desperate that Li Keyong even considered abandoning Taiyuan and fleeing; eventually, Taiyuan's defenses held, but the damage to Li Keyong's army was so severe that it was said for several years Li Keyong did not dare to seriously consider engaging Zhu again. ''Zizhi Tongjian'', vol. 263 (:zh:s:資治通鑑 卷263). In spring 384, Murong Chui openly declared the establishment of Later Yan, claiming the title of Prince of Yan. Fu Pi tried to persuade Murong Chui to end his rebellion, but Murong Chui refused and attacked Yecheng but was unable to capture it quickly. However, most cities north of the Yellow River and east of Taihang Mountains switched allegiance or were captured by Later Yan forces, leaving Yecheng isolated. (The Former Qin cities south of the Yellow River were largely captured by Jin.) With the heart of the empire itself under attacks by rebel regimes Later Qin and Western Yan, Fu Pi could have no expectation of receiving aid, and the situation soon grew desperate for him and his troops. In late 384, Murong Chui briefly lifted the siege of Yecheng to try to regroup, but at the same time, Jin forces attacked. Fu Pi sued for peace, but without his knowledge his assistant Yang Ying (楊膺) also promised on his behalf that he would surrender to Jin. With that promise, the Jin general Xie Xuan aided him with troops and food supplies, but eventually the temporary alliance broke up again. Meanwhile, Murong Chui returned and again put the city under siege after defeating Jin troops under Liu Laozhi (劉牢之). In 385, Fu Pi abandoned Yecheng and headed northwest to Jinyang (晉陽, in modern Taiyuan, Shanxi), where he received news that his father Fu Jiān had been killed by the Later Qin ruler Yao Chang. He then declared himself emperor. In 385, the Former Qin capital Chang'an fell to the rebel state Western Yan, and Fu Jiān was killed by another rebel general, Yao Chang the founder of Later Qin. Upon hearing this news, Fu Pi, who had then withdrawn from Yecheng to Jinyang (晉陽, in modern Taiyuan, Shanxi), declared himself emperor, and he created Princess Yang empress. In 386, however, as he tried to intercept Western Yan's prince Murong Yong, who was trying to return east, he was defeated by Murong Yong, and Empress Yang was captured. Fu Pi would then be intercepted by the Jin general Feng Gai (馮該) and killed. Murong Yong wanted to take Empress Yang as a consort, but she tried to assassinate him with a sword. He then put her to death. '''Lüliang''' ( WikiPedia:Taiyuan


amp+extreme

is among one of ten most air polluted cities in the world. Administrative divisions class "wikitable" style "font-size:90%;" align center


dance song

price content Festival focusing on Shanxi Province as a centre for local wine production. * Buy One area to visit for shopping is '''Bell Tower Street''' where you will find Fenjiu Dasha, Dongfang Department Store, Jinge Clothing Store and lots of smaller


nearby+important

resistance in the North China area. Near the end of the reign of Emperor Yang (Emperor Yang of Sui), Li Jing served as the Vice Prefect of Mayi Commandery (馬邑, roughly modern Shuozhou, Shanxi), when he served under the general Li Yuan (Emperor Gaozu of Tang) the Duke of Tang, who was in charge of the nearby important city of Taiyuan (太原, in modern Taiyuan, Shanxi) against Eastern Tujue forces. Li Jing came to suspect that Li Yuan was plotting a rebellion, and therefore pretended to commit a crime and asked to be locked up and delivered to Emperor Yang, who was then at Jiangdu (江都, in modern Yangzhou, Jiangsu). However, he was first delivered to Chang'an, and then, as nearly the entire Sui state was engulfed in agrarian rebellions at that time, there was no way to deliver him to Jiangdu from there. * Shenzhen (Shenzhen Baoan International Airport) * Taiyuan (Taiyuan Wusu Airport) * Ürümqi (Ürümqi Diwopu International Airport) *Beitongpu Railway; Datong-Fenglingdu 北同蒲线 *Taijiao Railway; Taiyuan-Jiaozuo 太焦线 *Jiaoliu Railway; Jiaozuo-Liuzhou 焦柳线 During the Tian Hu campaign, he suggests flooding the enemy city of Taiyuan to trap Tian Hu's forces and his proposal becomes instrumental in the eventual defeat of Tian. He joins the heroes on their campaign against Fang La later and makes even greater contributions. He goes behind enemy lines by diving into Lake Tai and infiltrating Fang La's battleships from underwater. He befriends some local heroes (Fei Bao, Ni Yun, Bo Qing and Di Cheng) and becomes sworn brothers with them. Early career Zhou's father, Zhou Bo (周勃), was one of the key generals for Liu Bang during the Chu Han Contention who would continue to play important roles in government and who was instrumental in the ascension to the throne by Emperor Jing's father Emperor Wen (Emperor Wen of Han). For his accomplishments, Zhou Bo was created the Marquess of Jiang. After Zhou Bo died in 169 BC, his son and Zhou Yafu's older brother Zhou Shengzhi (周勝之) inherited the march (marches), but after one year he was accused of murder and executed. In his stead, Zhou Yafu was created a marquess, but of a different march (Tiao). Later made the governor of the Commandery of Taiyuan (modern Taiyuan, Shanxi), Zhou quickly gained the reputation of being a capable administrator and military commander. WikiPedia:Taiyuan

Taiyuan

pic TY name.svg piccap "Taiyuan", as written in Chinese picsize 122px c 太原 p Tàiyuán w T'ai-yüan j taai 3 jyun 4 wuu tha 去 nyoe 平 poj Thài-goân l Great Plains '''Taiyuan''' (

Search by keywords:


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017