Taghaza

What is Taghaza known for?


translation

Sixteenth century At some date Taghaza came under the control of the Songhai Empire which had its capital at the city of Gao on the Niger River across the Sahara. Al-Sadi in his ''Tarikh al-Sudan'' chronicles the efforts of the Moroccan rulers of the Saadi

, Volume 3. The original text of Pory's 1600 English translation together with an introduction and notes by the editor. * . First published in 1981 by Cambridge University Press, ISBN 0-521-22422


150

blank5_info blank6_name blank6_info website footnotes '''Taghaza''' (also '''Teghaza''') is an abandoned salt-mining centre located in a salt pan (Dry lake) in the desert region of northern Mali. It was an important source of rock salt for West Africa up to the end of the 16th century when it was abandoned and replaced by the salt-pan at Taoudenni which lies

was abandoned and Taoudenni, situated to the southeast and thus nearer to Timbuktu, took its place as the region's key salt producer. In 1828 the French

with those of Taghaza. Fifty years later Valentim Fernandes wrote


place recording

days, arrived at the dry salt-lake bed of Taghaza with its salt mines. All of the local buildings were made from slabs of salt by slaves of the Masufa tribe, who cut the salt in thick slabs for transport by camel. Taghaza was a commercial centre and awash with Malian (Mali Empire) gold, though Ibn Battuta did not form a favourable impression of the place, recording that it was plagued by flies and the water was brackish. Mining Mining has long been an important aspect of the Malian economy. Gold, the third largest source of Malian exports, is still mined in the southern region: at the end of the 20th century Mali had the third highest gold production in Africa (after South Africa and Ghana).


Taghaza

blank5_info blank6_name blank6_info website footnotes '''Taghaza''' (also '''Teghaza''') is an abandoned salt-mining centre located in a salt pan (Dry lake) in the desert region of northern Mali. It was an important source of rock salt for West Africa up to the end of the 16th century when it was abandoned and replaced by the salt-pan at Taoudenni which lies

on to the southeast. Salt from the Taghaza mines formed an important part of the long distance trans-Saharan trade. The salt-pan is located north-northeast of Oualata (in Mauritania). Early Arabic sources The Taghaza mines are first mentioned by name (as Taghara) in around 1275 by the geographer Zakariya al-Qazwini al Qazwini


600

but would also be traded as slaves. On the return from Takedda to Morocco, his caravan transported 600 female slaves, suggesting that slavery was a substantial part of the commercial activity of the empire. Candice Goucher, Charles LeGuin, and Linda Walton, Trade, Transport, Temples, and Tribute: The Economics of Power, in In the Balance: Themes in Global History (Boston: McGraw-Hill, 1998) ref>

for trade but would also be traded as slaves. On the return from Takedda to Morocco, his caravan transported 600 female slaves, suggesting that slavery was a substantial part of the commercial activity of the empire. Candice Goucher, Charles LeGuin, and Linda Walton, Trade, Transport, Temples, and Tribute: The Economics of Power, in In the Balance: Themes in Global History (Boston: McGraw-Hill, 1998) ref>

a surrounding wall with a single small entrance on the western side. The ruins are still visible 600 m north of the prison building. The ruins of the ksar are at . A plan of the ksar was published by Cortier 1906, p. 327. The western routes were the Walata (Oualata) Road, from the Sénégal River, and the Taghaza Trail, from the Mali River, which had


vivid

servants and families and assigning them to conquered territories. They were responsible for raising local militias. Centralization made Songhay very stable, even during dynastic disputes. Leo Africanus left vivid descriptions of the empire under Askiya Muhammad. Askiya Muhammad was deposed by his son in 1528. After much rivalry, Muhammad Ture's last son Askiya Daoud (Askia Daoud) (1529–1582) assumed the throne. Collins and Burns (2007), p. 88. In the autumn


salt

blank5_info blank6_name blank6_info website footnotes '''Taghaza''' (also '''Teghaza''') is an abandoned salt-mining centre located in a salt pan (Dry lake) in the desert region of northern Mali. It was an important source of rock salt for West Africa up to the end of the 16th century when it was abandoned and replaced by the salt-pan at Taoudenni which lies

on to the southeast. Salt from the Taghaza mines formed an important part of the long distance trans-Saharan trade. The salt-pan is located north-northeast of Oualata (in Mauritania). Early Arabic sources The Taghaza mines are first mentioned by name (as Taghara) in around 1275 by the geographer Zakariya al-Qazwini al Qazwini

who spent most of his life in Iraq but obtained information from a traveller who had visited the Sudan (Sudan (region)). . He wrote that the town was situated south of the Maghreb near the Ocean and that the ramparts, walls and roofs of the buildings were made of salt which was mined by slaves of the Masufa, a Berber (Berber people) tribe, and exported


328

of Taoudenni is by al-Sadi in his ''Tarikh al-Sudan'' who wrote that in 1586 when Moroccan forces attacked the salt mining center of Taghaza (150 km north west of Taoudenni) some of the miners moved to 'Tawdani'. At the time the only building was the Ksar de Smida which had


single small

a surrounding wall with a single small entrance on the western side. The ruins are still visible 600 m north of the prison building. The ruins of the ksar are at


486

-5. * . Page 329 has a map showing the sabkha and the two settlements. Page 486 has plans of the settlements. Further reading *

Taghaza

'''Taghaza''' (also '''Teghaza''') is an abandoned salt-mining centre located in a salt pan (Dry lake) in the desert region of northern Mali. It was an important source of rock salt for West Africa up to the end of the 16th century when it was abandoned and replaced by the salt-pan at Taoudenni which lies north-northeast of Oualata (in Mauritania).

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