Taghaza

What is Taghaza known for?


Taghaza

blank5_info blank6_name blank6_info website footnotes '''Taghaza''' (also '''Teghaza''') is an abandoned salt-mining centre located in a salt pan (Dry lake) in the desert region of northern Mali. It was an important source of rock salt for West Africa up to the end of the 16th century when it was abandoned and replaced by the salt-pan at Taoudenni which lies

on to the southeast. Salt from the Taghaza mines formed an important part of the long distance trans-Saharan trade. The salt-pan is located north-northeast of Oualata (in Mauritania). Early Arabic sources The Taghaza mines are first mentioned by name (as Taghara) in around 1275 by the geographer Zakariya al-Qazwini al Qazwini


place+recording

days, arrived at the dry salt-lake bed of Taghaza with its salt mines. All of the local buildings were made from slabs of salt by slaves of the Masufa tribe, who cut the salt in thick slabs for transport by camel. Taghaza was a commercial centre and awash with Malian (Mali Empire) gold, though Ibn Battuta did not form a favourable impression of the place, recording that it was plagued by flies and the water was brackish. Mining Mining has long been an important aspect of the Malian economy. Gold, the third largest source of Malian exports, is still mined in the southern region: at the end of the 20th century Mali had the third highest gold production in Africa (after South Africa and Ghana).


single small

a surrounding wall with a single small entrance on the western side. The ruins are still visible 600 m north of the prison building. The ruins of the ksar are at


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blank5_info blank6_name blank6_info website footnotes '''Taghaza''' (also '''Teghaza''') is an abandoned salt-mining centre located in a salt pan (Dry lake) in the desert region of northern Mali. It was an important source of rock salt for West Africa up to the end of the 16th century when it was abandoned and replaced by the salt-pan at Taoudenni which lies

was abandoned and Taoudenni, situated to the southeast and thus nearer to Timbuktu, took its place as the region's key salt producer. In 1828 the French

with those of Taghaza. Fifty years later Valentim Fernandes wrote


blue field

This maritime trade competed with the trans-Saharan gold trade. Economy There were integrated kingdoms and empires, with substantial cities and significant towns; and less organised territories with large scattered populations. People practised agriculture, stock-rearing, hunting, fishing, slaving, and crafts (metalworking, textiles, ceramics). They navigated along rivers and across lakes, trading over short and long distances, using their own currencies. Like in many other regions across Africa, powerful indigenous kingdoms along the Bight of Benin relied heavily on a long established slave trade (African slave trade). The Ashanti (The Ashanti) exploited their military predominance to bring slaves to coastal forts established first by Portugal after 1480, and afterwards by the Dutch (Netherlands), Danish (Denmark), and English (England). The slaving network quickly expanded deep


vivid

servants and families and assigning them to conquered territories. They were responsible for raising local militias. Centralization made Songhay very stable, even during dynastic disputes. Leo Africanus left vivid descriptions of the empire under Askiya Muhammad. Askiya Muhammad was deposed by his son in 1528. After much rivalry, Muhammad Ture's last son Askiya Daoud (Askia Daoud) (1529–1582) assumed the throne. Collins and Burns (2007), p. 88. In the autumn


important

blank5_info blank6_name blank6_info website footnotes '''Taghaza''' (also '''Teghaza''') is an abandoned salt-mining centre located in a salt pan (Dry lake) in the desert region of northern Mali. It was an important source of rock salt for West Africa up to the end of the 16th century when it was abandoned and replaced by the salt-pan at Taoudenni which lies

on to the southeast. Salt from the Taghaza mines formed an important part of the long distance trans-Saharan trade. The salt-pan is located north-northeast of Oualata (in Mauritania). Early Arabic sources The Taghaza mines are first mentioned by name (as Taghara) in around 1275 by the geographer Zakariya al-Qazwini al Qazwini

) Descrittione dell’Africa '' he mentions that the location of the mines, 20 days journey from a source of food, meant that there was a risk of starvation. At the time of Leo's visit, Oualata was no longer an important terminus for the trans-Saharan trade and salt was instead taken south to Timbuktu. Like Ibn Battuta before him, Leo complained about the brackish well water.


describing

was abandoned and Taoudenni, situated to the southeast and thus nearer to Timbuktu, took its place as the region's key salt producer. In 1828 the French


Taghaza

blank5_info blank6_name blank6_info website footnotes '''Taghaza''' (also '''Teghaza''') is an abandoned salt-mining centre located in a salt pan (Dry lake) in the desert region of northern Mali. It was an important source of rock salt for West Africa up to the end of the 16th century when it was abandoned and replaced by the salt-pan at Taoudenni which lies

on to the southeast. Salt from the Taghaza mines formed an important part of the long distance trans-Saharan trade. The salt-pan is located north-northeast of Oualata (in Mauritania). Early Arabic sources The Taghaza mines are first mentioned by name (as Taghara) in around 1275 by the geographer Zakariya al-Qazwini al Qazwini


architectural quot" and "67"="89

who spent most of his life in Iraq but obtained information from a traveller who had visited the Sudan (Sudan (region)). . He wrote that the town was situated south of the Maghreb near the Ocean and that the ramparts, walls and roofs of the buildings were made of salt which was mined by slaves of the Masufa, a Berber (Berber people) tribe, and exported

u7xjAAAAMAAJ&pg PA128#v onepage&q&f false 128 Vol. 2 . Caillié uses the spelling ''Trasas'' or ''Trarzas''. See The larger

Brill place Leiden isbn 90-04-11211-1 page 89 url https: archive.org stream EncyclopaediaDictionaryIslamMuslimWorldEtcGibbKramerScholars.13 10.EncycIslam.NewEdPrepNumLeadOrient.EdEdComCon.BearBianBosDonHein.etc.UndPatIUA.v10.T-U.Leid.EJBrill.2000.#page n103 mode 1up . *

Taghaza

'''Taghaza''' (also '''Teghaza''') is an abandoned salt-mining centre located in a salt pan (Dry lake) in the desert region of northern Mali. It was an important source of rock salt for West Africa up to the end of the 16th century when it was abandoned and replaced by the salt-pan at Taoudenni which lies north-northeast of Oualata (in Mauritania).

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