Switzerland

What is Switzerland known for?


small significant

. By the early 2000s, Ukrainian embassies reported that 300,000 Ukrainian citizens were working in Poland, 200,000 in Italy, approximately 200,000 in the Czech Republic, 150,000 in Portugal, 100,000 in Spain, 35,000 in Turkey, 20,000 in the United States and small significant numbers in Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Greece, Sweden, Switzerland and the UK. The largest number of Ukrainian workers abroad, about one million, are in the Russian Federation. Since 1992, 232,072 persons born in Ukraine have emigrated to the US. Many Swiss (Switzerland) settlements (''colonias'' or "colonies") such as Colonia Suiza, Colonia Valdense and Nueva Helvecia were founded in the department of Colonia (Colonia Department). Also, there are towns founded by early British settlers, such as Conchillas and Barker (Barker, Uruguay). A Russian colony called San Javier (San Javier, Uruguay), is found in the department of Río Negro (Río Negro Department). Also there are Mennonite colonies in the department of Río Negro and in the department of Canelones (Canelones Department). The '''Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees''' ('''UNHCR'''), also known as '''The UN Refugee Agency''' is a United Nations agency mandated to protect and support refugees at the request of a government or the UN itself and assists in their voluntary repatriation, local integration or resettlement to a third country. Its headquarters are in Geneva, Switzerland and is a member of the United Nations Development Group. http: www.undg.org index.cfm?P 13 The UNHCR has won two Nobel Peace Prizes, once in 1954 and again in 1981. commons:Confoederatio Helvetica


military complex

for the migration of wildlife. A military complex near Nunspeet was removed instead of being redeveloped as a business area. By now again in agreement with Himmler on the issue of futility of continuing the war, from February 1945 Wolff under Operation Sunrise (Operation Sunrise (World War II)) took over command and management of intermediaries including Swiss (Switzerland)-national Max Waibel, in order to make contact in Switzerland with the headquarters of the U.S. Office


scale based

merger acquisition of Mettler Instrumente AG (Switzerland, 1945) and Toledo Scale (Columbus, Ohio, 1901) location_city Greifensee '''Mettler-Toledo''' ( ) is a manufacturer of scales and analytical instruments. It was formed by the merging of two companies: Mettler, based in Switzerland, and Toledo Scale, based in Columbus, Ohio, USA. The resultant company is currently headquartered in Columbus, Ohio and in Zurich, Switzerland, with offices for its many brands


artistic activities

and composition in the Conservatories (College or university school of music) of Verona, Bolzano, and Milan. At the age of 17, he made his professional debut as an orchestra director. After the war, Zanolli returned to artistic activities, working in some of the most important theatres in Italy, Switzerland, France, Portugal, Spain and the United States. Later years In 1874, Padial went into a self-impossed exile in Switzerland, when the Spanish Monarchy returned to power. Padial returned to Spain on January 1879 and died on March 5, 1879 in Madrid. '''Erik Truffaz''' (born 1960 in Switzerland) is a Swiss (Switzerland)-born French (France) jazz trumpeter, infusing elements of hip hop, rock and roll and dance music into his compositions. He signed with the French EMI label in 1996. Truffaz gained international attention with his second album on Blue Note, ''The Dawn'', produced together with Pat Muller, Marcello Giuliani and Mark Erbetta. Since then they have produced many Blue Note albums together such as ''Bending New Corners'', which became a Silver Album in France. The 2007 release Arkhangelsk (Arkhangelsk (album)) is a mixture of pop songs, French ''chanson'', and jazz-groove. In 2007 he and Ed Harcourt appeared in a ''Take-Away Show'' video session shot by Vincent Moon. '''Erik Truffaz''' (born 1960 in Switzerland) is a Swiss (Switzerland)-born French (France) jazz trumpeter, infusing elements of hip hop, rock and roll and dance music into his compositions. He signed with the French EMI label in 1996. Truffaz gained international attention with his second album on Blue Note, ''The Dawn'', produced together with Pat Muller, Marcello Giuliani and Mark Erbetta. Since then they have produced many Blue Note albums together such as ''Bending New Corners'', which became a Silver Album in France. The 2007 release Arkhangelsk (Arkhangelsk (album)) is a mixture of pop songs, French ''chanson'', and jazz-groove. In 2007 he and Ed Harcourt appeared in a ''Take-Away Show'' video session shot by Vincent Moon. '''Solar Impulse''' is a Swiss (Switzerland) long-range solar powered plane project being undertaken at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, by Bertrand Piccard and André Borschberg. The project eventually hopes to succeed in the first circling of the earth with a piloted fixed-wing aircraft using only solar power. The project is promoted by Bertrand Piccard, who co-piloted the first balloon to circle the world non-stop. Fédération Aéronautique Internationale FAI entry of the 1999 record On 8 July 2010, HB-SIA achieved the world's first manned 26-hour solar flight. commons:Confoederatio Helvetica


numerous scenes

The German sport '''kegeln''' or nine-pin bowling is played with nine pins, in broadly organized leagues and is also popular in many other countries with long German connections, including Austria, Switzerland, Serbia, Slovenia, Croatia, Hungary and Liechtenstein. The game was once also the dominant bowling game in the United States (but today only survives in rural Texas), and also led to an Australian variant (#Australia). However, in February 1983, the programme "A bon entendeur" on Télévision Suisse Romande, a French language Swiss (Switzerland) TV channel, followed the route of the barrels to Saint-Quentin (Saint-Quentin, Aisne) in northern France where they disappeared. A public debate ensued in which numerous theories were put forward when it was found that Mannesmann Italiana had hired two subcontractors to get rid of the toxic waste. On May 19 the 41 barrels were found in an unused abattoir (slaughterhouse) in Anguilcourt-le-Sart, a village in northern France. From there they were transferred to a French military base near Sissonne. The Roche Group (parent firm of Givaudan) took it upon itself to properly dispose of the waste. On November 25, over nine years after the disaster, the Roche Group issued a public statement that the toxic waste consisting of 42 barrels (1 was added earlier that year) had all been incinerated in Switzerland. According to New Scientist it was thought that the high chlorine content of the waste might cause damage to the high temperature incinerator used by Roche, but Roche stated that they would burn the waste in the incinerator and repair it afterward if it were damaged. They stated that they wanted to take responsibility for the safe destruction of the waste. However, in February 1983, the programme "A bon entendeur" on Télévision Suisse Romande, a French language Swiss (Switzerland) TV channel, followed the route of the barrels to Saint-Quentin (Saint-Quentin, Aisne) in northern France where they disappeared. A public debate ensued in which numerous theories were put forward when it was found that Mannesmann Italiana had hired two subcontractors to get rid of the toxic waste. On May 19 the 41 barrels were found in an unused abattoir (slaughterhouse) in Anguilcourt-le-Sart, a village in northern France. From there they were transferred to a French military base near Sissonne. The Roche Group (parent firm of Givaudan) took it upon itself to properly dispose of the waste. On November 25, over nine years after the disaster, the Roche Group issued a public statement that the toxic waste consisting of 42 barrels (1 was added earlier that year) had all been incinerated in Switzerland. According to New Scientist it was thought that the high chlorine content of the waste might cause damage to the high temperature incinerator used by Roche, but Roche stated that they would burn the waste in the incinerator and repair it afterward if it were damaged. They stated that they wanted to take responsibility for the safe destruction of the waste. * In the Netherlands some Frisians covet an autonomous country or area (Friese beweging). *Switzerland’s division into cantons (Cantons of Switzerland) along geographical, religious and linguistic lines. Harold E. Glass, Ethnic Diversity, Elite Accommodation and Federalism in Switzerland, Publius, Vol. 7, No. 4, Federalism and Ethnicity (Autumn, 1977), 31-48. Oxford University Press. * French-speaking Quebec debating and voting on separation from Canada over several decades. It is unclear if this is a matter of ethnic, linguistic or territorial nationalism (Quebec nationalism). The reform was based on an international agreement signed in Vienna in July 1996 by the governments of the German (German language)-speaking countries of Germany, Austria, Liechtenstein and Switzerland. Luxembourg, in which German is one of the three official languages, regarded itself "as a non-German-speaking country not to be a contributory determinant upon the German system of spelling" (statement of Othon Neuen, spokesman for the Luxembourg Ministry of Education). Institution of the reform On July 1, 1996, all of the German states (''Bundesländer (States of Germany)''), and the countries of Austria, Switzerland, and Liechtenstein, as well as some other countries with German-speaking minorities (but notably not Luxembourg) agreed to introduce the new spelling by August 1, 1998. A few German Bundesländer introduced the new rules starting with the 1996–1997 school year. In Switzerland The German debate about the spelling reform produced much surprise among Swiss media companies, rather than agreement. In Switzerland, the reform has had a less noticeable impact since the letter "ß", which was the most prominent part of the reform, had not been in much use anyway. Most Swiss newspapers and magazines follow house style that, in the case of the ''Neue Zürcher Zeitung'', Switzerland's leading daily paper, diverges substantially from the official rules. The ''Schweizer Monatshefte'' company returned to the traditional Swiss spelling in 2004. Education He briefly attended schools in Switzerland and Britain (United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland), and later studied at St. Paul's School (St. Paul's School (Concord, New Hampshire)) in Concord, New Hampshire and Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where he was a classmate of Theodore Roosevelt, an editor of the Harvard Lampoon and a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon (Alpha chapter). Wister graduated from Harvard in 1882. After the arrival of steam-powered transportation, around 1825, the Grand Tour custom continued, but it was of a qualitative difference — cheaper to undertake, safer, easier, open to anyone. During much of the 19th century, most educated young men of privilege undertook the Grand Tour. Germany and Switzerland came to be included in a more broadly defined circuit. Later, it became fashionable for young women as well; a trip to Italy, with a spinster aunt as chaperon (Chaperone (social)), was part of the upper-class woman's education, as in E.M. Forster's novel ''A Room with a View''. At least into the late 1960s organized bus tours staffed by teachers took American high school graduates on eight week trips across Europe. These roughly followed the traditional route, but flying the longer segments expanded the area covered to include parts of Scandinavia. From Paris he would typically go to urban Switzerland for a while, often to Geneva (the cradle of the Protestant Reformation) or Lausanne. ("Alpinism" or mountaineering developed in the 19th century.) Sometimes he would go to Spain, to visit Barcelona, and in rare occasions, the itinerary would include Madrid and Seville. From there the traveler would endure a difficult crossing over the Alps into northern Italy (such as at the St. Bernard Pass), which included dismantling the carriage and luggage. If wealthy enough, he might be carried over the hard terrain by servants. In 1789 Madame de Genlis showed herself favourable to the French Revolution


driving quot

of work, the first section of the road, from Fort Bay to The Bottom, was completed. It was not until 1947, however, that the first motor vehicle arrived. In 1951, the road to Windwardside and St. Johns was opened, and in 1958 the road was completed. Driving "The Road" is considered to be a daunting task, and the curves in Windwardside are extremely difficult to negotiate. Driving is on the right hand side. Image:Jet d'eau 1886.jpg right thumb 220px The first jet d'eau, around 1886

(and white letters), while for minor roads the signs are white (with black letters). Moreover, some roads are limited to '''30km h''' (19 mph) or even to '''20km h''' (12 mph) in '''built-up areas''' and to 70km h outside built-up areas. Vehicles unable to travel at 80 km h are not permitted on the motorways or autoroutes. Whilst driving "a wee bit too fast" is common on motorways, people tend to stick pretty closely to the other two limits. Fines are hefty and traffic rules are strictly


speed energy

, no. 10, pp. 1021–1023, Nov. 1984. A substantial simplification of this proposes that as other forms of energy changes are inconsequential during the flow of air around a wing and that energy transfer in out of the air is not significant, then the sum of pressure energy and speed energy for any particular parcel of air must be constant. Consequently, an increase in speed must be accompanied by a decrease in pressure and vice-versa. It should be noted that this is not a causational


event popular

winning the men's championship. The 2006 European Championships were held in Switzerland, with Great Britain taking both the Men's and Under-18's titles, while the hosts won the Ladies event. Popular Music Popular styles of music in Namibia include hip hop, R&B, Soul (Soul music), reggae, afro-pop, house (house music) and kwaito. Upon Namibia's independence Jackson Kaujeua and Ras Sheehama had been the most outstanding Namibian performers. Kaujeua had been


tradition title

Cenovis is popular in Switzerland, (particularly Romandy). It was developed in Rheinfelden in 1931, on the initiative of a master brewer called Alex Villinger, commons:Confoederatio Helvetica


great performance

football team Switzerland and was selected again for Euro 2008 (UEFA Euro 2008) but did not play any games. National team Michalis Kapsis was included in the squad of Euro 2004 http: news.bbc.co.uk sport2 hi football euro_2004 3844467.stm that ended up winning the tournament and in particular Kapsis achieved a great performance. Kapsis was included in the Greek squad for the 2005 FIFA Confederations Cup in Germany. Otto Rehhagel also included him in the squad for the qualifying rounds (UEFA Euro 2008 qualifying) to the UEFA Euro 2008 in Switzerland and Austria. Michalis Kapsis made 34 appearances and even scored a goal against Georgia for FIFA World Cup qualification 2006 (2006 FIFA World Cup qualification (UEFA)) on 26 March 2005 in Georgia where Greece won 1-3. Exhibitions Kapoor initially began exhibiting as part of New British Sculpture art scene, along with fellow British sculptors Tony Cragg and Richard Deacon. His first solo exhibition took place at Patrice Alexandra, Paris, in 1980. Anish Kapoor, March 16 - October 12, 2010 Museo Guggenheim, Bilbao. In 1992 Kapoor contributed to documenta IX (Documenta) with the ''Building Decent into Limbo''. Anish Kapoor, May 5 - July 1, 2000 Lisson Gallery, London. He achieved widespread recognition when he represented Britain at the 1990 Venice Biennale. ''Imagine (Imagine (TV series)) - Winter 2009 - 1. The Year of Anish Kapoor'': BBC One, 11:35pm Tuesday 17th November 2009 Solo exhibitions of his work have since been held in the Tate and Hayward Gallery in London, Kunsthalle Basel in Switzerland, Reina Sofia (Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía) in Madrid, the National Gallery in Ottawa, Musee des arts contemporains (Grand-Hornu) in Belgium, the CAPC Museum of Contemporary Art in Bordeaux, the Centro Cultural Banco do Brasil in Brazil, and the Guggenheim (Guggenheim Museum Bilbao) in Bilbao and New York. In 2008, the Institute of Contemporary Art (Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston) in Boston exhibited Kapoor's first U.S. mid-career survey. Sebastian Smee, Anish Kapoor challenges perceptions in a mind-bending show at the ICA. ''The Boston Globe'', May 30, 2008. That same year, Kapoor’s ''Islamic Mirror'' (2008), a circular concave mirror, was installed in a 13th-century Arab palace now being used as by the Convent of Santa Clara in Murcia. Quinn Latimer (December 6, 2008), Rosa Martinez on Anish Kapoor’s “Islamic Mirror” ''ARTINFO''. Kapoor was the first living British artist to take over the Royal Academy, London, in 2009; commons:Confoederatio Helvetica

Switzerland

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-- '''Switzerland''' ( . While the Alps occupy the greater part of the territory, the Swiss population of approximately 8 million people is concentrated mostly on the Plateau, where the largest cities are to be found; among them are the two global (global city) and economic centres of Zürich and Geneva.

The establishment of the Swiss Confederation is traditionally dated to 1 August 1291, which is celebrated annually as Swiss National Day. The country has a long history of armed neutrality—it has not been in a state of war internationally since 1815—and did not join the United Nations until 2002. Nevertheless it pursues an active foreign policy and is frequently involved in peace-building processes around the world. Thomas Fleiner, Alexander Misic, Nicole Töpperwien, ''Swiss Constitutional Law'', p. 28, Kluwer Law International In addition to being the birthplace of the Red Cross (International Committee of the Red Cross), Switzerland is home to numerous international organizations, including the second largest UN office (United Nations Office at Geneva). On the European level, it is a founding member of the European Free Trade Association and is part of the Schengen Area – although it is notably not a member of the European Union, nor the European Economic Area.

Straddling the intersection of Germanic (German-speaking Europe) and Romance (Romance-speaking Europe) Europe, Switzerland comprises four main linguistic and cultural regions: German, French, Italian and Romansh (Romansh language). Therefore the Swiss (Swiss people), although predominantly German-speaking, do not form a nation in the sense of a common ethnicity or language; rather, Switzerland's strong sense of identity and community is founded on a common historical background, shared values such as federalism and direct democracy, Constitutional Patriotism and Exclusion: the Swiss Case

Switzerland ranks high in several metrics of national performance, including government transparency, civil liberties, economic competitiveness (Global Competitiveness Report), and human development (Human Development Index). It has the highest nominal wealth per adult (financial and non-financial assets) in the world according to Credit Suisse and the eighth-highest (List of countries by GDP (PPP) per capita) per capita gross domestic product on the IMF list.

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