Swaziland

What is Swaziland known for?


years making

) Swaziland was then briefly a Protected State until 1968, when independence was regained. Following the elections of 1973, the constitution of Swaziland was suspended by King Sobhuza II who thereafter ruled the country by decree until his death in 1982. At this point Sobhuza II had ruled Swaziland for 61 years, making him the longest ruling monarch in history. A regency followed his death, with Queen Regent Dzeliwe Shongwe being head of state until 1984 when she was removed by Liqoqo and replaced by Queen Mother Ntfombi Tfwala. Mswati III, the son of Ntfombi, was crowned king on 25 April 1986 as King and ''Ingwenyama (Ngwenyama)'' of Swaziland. The 1990s saw a rise in student and labour protests pressuring the king to introduce reforms. Thus, progress toward constitutional reforms began, culminating with the introduction of the current Swaziland constitution in 2005. This happened despite objections by political activists. The current constitution does not clearly deal with the status of political parties. The first election under the new constitution, took place in 2008. Members of parliament were elected from 55 constituencies (also known as tinkhundla ). These MPs served five-year terms which ended in 2013. In 2011, Swaziland suffered an economic crisis, due to reduced SACU (Southern African Customs Union) receipts. This led to the government of Swaziland to request a loan from neighbouring South Africa. However, the Swazi government did not agree with the conditions of the loan, which included political reforms. During this period, there was increased pressure on the Swaziland government to carry out more reforms. Public protests by civic organisations and trade unions became more common. Improvements in SACU receipts from 2012 on-wards, eased the fiscal pressure on the Swazi government. The new parliament, the second since promulgation of the constitution, was elected on 20 September 2013. This saw the reappointment of Sibusiso Dlamini (Barnabas Sibusiso Dlamini), by the king, as prime minister for the third time. Government and politics Commons:Category:Swaziland WikiPedia:Swaziland Dmoz:Regional Africa Swaziland


time elegant

(not everyone in Bulgaria is ethnically Bulgarian, the ethnic group predates the modern country, there are ethnic Bulgarians outside Bulgaria and the adjective doesn't distinguish nationality from ethnicity - but those problems don't cause much fuss and moving "Bulgarian people" to "People of Bulgaria" would probably get little support on its At the current time, elegant redirects to elegance, democratic redirects to democracy, and adjectival redirects to adjective.own) --VivaEmilyDavies (User:VivaEmilyDavies) 01:40, 3 Apr 2005 (UTC) :This is just another case of political correctness or of foolish consistency run amok among the Wikipedia categorizers. The very notion of "Foowegian people" is fraught with difficulty, since that is the form usually used in reference to peoples. "Swazi people" can refer to an ethnic group, the Swazi people, and to individual members of that group, rather than to individuals "of Swaziland". Gene Nygaard (User:Gene Nygaard) 00:55, 3 Apr 2005 (UTC) ::I do see the point, but it is an overwhelming consistency (see :Category:People by nationality) and using "Foowegian ..." rather than "... of Foo" makes more sense for people - precisely because (a) it is a bit fuzzier round the edges (just like people - and unlike, for example, political structures or geographic features which are better categorised by country) and (b) many historical figures can be classed as Foowegian even though Foo did not exist as a country at that time. The real "categorisation gone mad", as far as I can see, would be to try to class people together by country instead, with the view that that, being less fuzzy, it is somehow more exact. "Swazi" is better for categorisation than "... of Swaziland" when referring to people because a person who would fit easier into the first than the second ought to have a place to go (and does it really matter that Swazis who don't fit the Swaziland definition are side by side with those who do? They really aren't so different, and people will know how to find either). On the other hand, "Mountains of Swaziland" and "Olympic athletes of Swaziland" make more sense than their "Swazi" equivalents because the ambiguity would hold no benefit there. Consistency is only a limited good, but here it makes sense - I can't see why Swazis and Swaziland should be treated any differently to Bulgarians and Bulgaria (not everyone in Bulgaria is ethnically Bulgarian, the ethnic group predates the modern country, there are ethnic Bulgarians outside Bulgaria and the adjective doesn't distinguish nationality from ethnicity - but those problems don't cause much fuss and moving "Bulgarian people" to "People of Bulgaria" would probably get little support on its At the current time, elegant redirects to elegance, democratic redirects to democracy, and adjectival redirects to adjective.own) --VivaEmilyDavies (User:VivaEmilyDavies) 01:40, 3 Apr 2005 (UTC) image 230px border (File:RhodesiaAllies1975.png) caption The geopolitical situation of the war after the independence of Angola and Mozambique in 1975. Rhodesia itself is shown in green, South Africa (South Africa under Apartheid) and its dependency South-West Africa (now Namibia) are coloured blue and other nations, friendly to the nationalist guerrillas, are shown in camel. 1 Malawi, 2 Swaziland, 3 Lesotho date 4 July 1964 – 12 December 1979 Commons:Category:Swaziland WikiPedia:Swaziland Dmoz:Regional Africa Swaziland


rock world

(Level 42), Bah Samba, members of Jamiroquai and Beverley Martyn. His playing covers a variety of styles including jazz, Latin (Latin American music), rock (rock (music)), world music, flamenco and funk . He released a solo album, entitled ''Esprit'', in 1999 and has recently collaborated with members of Paco de Lucia and Chick Corea's bands on his latest album ''Alkimia:'' Jorge Pardo, Rubem Dantas as well as Juan Manuel Canizares, Benjamin Sarfas


major hit

: University of California Press. 1989. pp. 310-316. - Swaziland King Mswati II (Mswati II of Swaziland) - ''Mbube'' is both a song, originally released in the 1940s by Solomon Linda, and a genre of South African popular music that was inspired by it. "Mbube" was recorded in 1939 and became a major hit in Swaziland. The song was in a traditional Zulu choral style, which soon came to the attention of American musicologist (musicology) Alan Lomax


quot membership

); Haiti (1.28% of the population); Barbados (1.0% of the population); and Swaziland (0.96% of the population). In 2000 there was the highest percentage of Nazarene presence in the USA, with 2.25 members for every 1,000 US people (0.25%). Finke and Starke, 177. According to the Board of General Superintendents (General Superintendent (Church of the Nazarene)) in December 2009, "an average of 455 people came


title radical

, and Tanzania before entering Kenya.


wooden sculptures

, as well as in the UK. All Swazi vendors will take Rand, but no South African vendors will take emalangeni. When travelling on the kombis in Swaziland, the operators will NOT take Rand coins. Shopping There are smaller stores, where you can buy everything from Swazi Foods to Swazi wooden sculptures and handmade bags. Eat Many Western foods are available in Swazi grocery stores, but traditional foods are still common, as is modern convenient food based on traditional ingredients


analysis published

author Ansley J. Coale coauthors Judith Banister month December year 1996 title Five decades of missing females in China journal Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society volume 140 issue 4 pages 421–450 jstor 987286 An analysis published in 2011 in ''The Lancet'' attributes Japanese life expectancy to equal opportunities and public health as well as diet.


made international

of schools, homes, libraries, and community centers full of books, computers and other literacy materials, where a general awareness is fostered, among all age groups, of the power of literacy as a tool for life-long learning, personal upliftment, and self-reliance. *Carl Bowman '79, Sociologist Author Educator, Bridgewater College, Bridgewater, VA *Phesheya Dube (Swaziland Broadcasting and Information Service#Phesheya Dube) '00, a journalist from Swaziland who made

international news by posing as a war correspondent in Iraq on state-run radio while actually broadcasting from a broom closet in the Swazi capital. *Bill Foster (Bill Foster (college basketball coach)) '54, former head coach, Duke (Duke University) men's basketball and 1978 Coach of the Year Duke Blue Devils#Coaches * '''Sudan''' - Mustafa Osman Ismail (1998-2005) * '''Swaziland''' - Albert Nhlanhla Shabangu (1998-2001) * '''Tanzania''' - Jakaya Kikwete (1995-2006) * '''Sudan''' - Ali Osman Taha (1995-1998) * '''Swaziland''' - Arthur Khoza (1995-1998) * '''Tanzania''' - Jakaya Kikwete (1995-2006) * '''Sudan''' - Ali Osman Taha (1995-1998) * '''Swaziland''' - Arthur Khoza (1995-1998) * '''Tanzania''' - Jakaya Kikwete (1995-2006) * '''Sudan''' - Hussein Suleiman Abu Saleh (1993-1995) * '''Swaziland''' - Solomon Dlamini (1993-1995) * '''Tanzania''' - Joseph Rwegasira (1993-1995) - Commons:Category:Swaziland WikiPedia:Swaziland Dmoz:Regional Africa Swaziland


population publications

title Swaziland Demographics Profile 2013 publisher Indexmundi.com date 2013-02-21 accessdate 2014-08-16 The present population growth rate is 1.195%. population publications wpp2006 WPP2006_Highlights_rev.pdf United Nations World Population Prospects: 2006 revision – Table A.8 Swaziland is well known for its culture.

web url http: www.un.org esa population publications wpp2008 wpp2008_text_tables.pdf title World Population Prospects: 2008 Revision. United Nations format PDF accessdate 7 September 2012 This translates into an estimated 0.6% of the population dying from AIDS every year. Chronic illnesses that are the most prolific causes of death in the developed world account only for a minute fraction of deaths in Swaziland; for example, heart disease, strokes, and cancer cause fewer than 5

Swaziland

'''Swaziland''', officially the '''Kingdom of Swaziland''' (

Swaziland is one of the smallest countries in Africa. It is no more than

The country is the last absolute monarchy in Africa. issue 630 last Tofa first Moses title Swaziland: Wither absolute monarchism? work Pambazuka News accessdate 2014-10-19 date 2013-05-16 url http: www.pambazuka.net en category features 87402 print It is currently ruled by King (Ngwenyama) Mswati III. title Swaziland: Africa′s last absolute monarchy work Deutsche Welle accessdate 2014-10-19 date 2014-07-14 url http: www.dw.de swaziland-africas-last-absolute-monarchy a-17784664 The king is head of state and appoints the prime minister and a number of representatives of both chambers of parliament (Parliament of Swaziland). Elections are held every five years to determine the majority of the house of assembly. The current constitution (Constitution of Swaziland) was adopted in 2005. Swaziland is a member of the Southern African Development Community, the African Union, and the Commonwealth of Nations.

Swaziland is a developing country, with a small economy. It is classified as a lower-middle-income country with a GDP per capita of $6,367. With membership in the Southern African Customs Union (SACU) and COMESA, its main trading partners are South Africa, United States, and the country's currency, the lilangeni (Swazi lilangeni), is pegged to the South African Rand. The agriculture and manufacturing sectors of the country's economy are responsible for the majority of employment.

The Swazi population faces major health issues. HIV AIDS, and to a lesser extent, tuberculosis are the main health challenges. The present population growth rate is 1.195%. United Nations World Population Prospects: 2006 revision – Table A.8

Swaziland is well known for its culture.

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