Sukhumi

What is Sukhumi known for?


related style

-1600-5. Neo-Byzantine architecture had a small following in the wake of the 19th-century Gothic revival, resulting in such jewels as Westminster Cathedral in London, and in Bristol from about 1850 to 1880 a related style known as Bristol Byzantine was popular for industrial buildings which combined elements of the Byzantine style with Moorish architecture. It was developed on a wide-scale basis in Russia during the reign of Alexander II (Alexander II of Russia) by Grigory Gagarin and his followers who designed St Volodymyr's Cathedral in Kiev, St Nicholas Naval Cathedral (:Image:Kronstadt Naval Cathedral 1.jpg) in Kronstadt, Alexander Nevsky Cathedral in Sofia, Saint Mark's church (St. Mark's Church, Belgrade) in Belgrade and the New Athos Monastery in New Athos near Sukhumi. The largest Neo-Byzantine project of the 20th century was the Temple of Saint Sava in Belgrade. - SUI UGSS Sukhumi Dranda Airport Sukhumi, Georgia (Georgia (country)) - - bgcolor "#F9F9F9" 1. align "left" Sukhumi align "left" Аҟәа სოხუმი 119,200 39,100 align "left" Sukhumi District - bgcolor "#F9F9F9" The Soviet Union Hertz, who was concerned for his safety and was looking, like his fellow Nobel laureate Franck, to move to the USA or any other place outside Germany, Manfred von Ardenne, director of his private laboratory ''Forschungslaboratorium für Elektronenphysik'', Peter Adolf Thiessen, ordinarius professor at the Humboldt University of Berlin and director of the Kaiser-Wilhelm Institut für physikalische Chemie und Elektrochemie (KWIPC) in Berlin-Dahlem (Dahlem (Berlin)), and Max Volmer, ordinarius professor and director of the Physical Chemistry Institute at the Berlin Technische Hochschule (Technical University of Berlin), had made a pact. sachen.de – ''Zur Ehrung von Manfred von Ardenne''. The pact was a pledge that whoever first made contact with the Russians would speak for the rest. The objectives of their pact were threefold: (1) Prevent plunder of their institutes, (2) Continue their work with minimal interruption, and (3) Protect themselves from prosecution for any political acts of the past. Heinemann-Grüder, 2002, 44. Before the end of World War II, Thiessen, a member of the Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei (NSDAP), had Communist contacts. Hentschel, 1996, Appendix F; see the entry for Thiessen. On 27 April 1945, Thiessen arrived at von Ardenne’s institute in an armored vehicle with a major of the Soviet Army, who was also a leading Soviet chemist. Oleynikov, 2000, pp 5, 10–13, 18, 21 All four of the pact members were taken to the Soviet Union. Hertz was made head of Institute G, in Agudseri (Agudzery),about 10 km southeast of Sukhumi and a suburb of Gul’rips (Gulrip’shi). Naimark, 1995, 213. Topics assigned to Gustav Hertz’s Institute G included: (1) Separation of isotopes by diffusion in a flow of inert gases, for which Gustav Hertz was the leader, (2) Development of a condensation pump, for which Justus Mühlenpfordt was the leader, (3) Design and build a mass spectrometer for determining the isotopic composition of uranium, for which Werner Schütze was the leader, (4) Development of frameless (ceramic) diffusion partitions for filters, for which Reinhold Reichmann was the leader, and (5) Development of a theory of stability and control of a diffusion cascade, for which Heinz Barwich was the leader; Kruglov, 2002, 131. Barwich had been deputy to Hertz at Siemens. Naimark, 1995, 209. Other members of Institute G were Werner Hartmann (Werner Hartmann (physicist)) and Karl-Franz Zühlke. Maddrell, 2006, 179–180. Von Ardenne was made head of Institute A, Goals of Manfred von Ardenne’s Institute A included: (1) Electromagnetic separation of isotopes, for which von Ardenne was the leader, (2) Techniques for manufacturing porous barriers for isotope separation, for which Peter Adolf Thiessen was the leader, and (3) Molecular techniques for separation of uranium isotopes, for which Max Steenbeck was the leader. In his first meeting with Lavrentij Beria (Lavrentiy Beria), von Ardenne was asked to participate in building the bomb, but von Ardenne quickly realized that participation would prohibit his repatriation to Germany, so he suggested isotope enrichment as an objective, which was agreed to. By the end of the 1940s, nearly 300 Germans were working at the institute, and they were not the total work force. Institute A was used as the basis for the Sukhumi Physical-Technical Institute in Sinop, a suburb of Sukhumi. Volmer went to the Nauchno-Issledovatel’skij Institut-9 (NII-9, Scientific Research Institute No. 9), Today, NII-9 is the Bochvar All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, Bochvar VNIINM. See Oleynikov, 2000, 4. in Moscow; he was given a design bureau to work on the production of heavy water. In Institute A, Thiessen became leader for developing techniques for manufacturing porous barriers for isotope separation. The Soviet Union Hertz, who was concerned for his safety and was looking, like his fellow Nobel laureate Franck, to move to the USA or any other place outside Germany, Manfred von Ardenne, director of his private laboratory ''Forschungslaboratorium für Elektronenphysik'', Peter Adolf Thiessen, ordinarius professor at the Humboldt University of Berlin and director of the Kaiser-Wilhelm Institut für physikalische Chemie und Elektrochemie (KWIPC) in Berlin-Dahlem (Dahlem (Berlin)), and Max Volmer, ordinarius professor and director of the Physical Chemistry Institute at the Berlin Technische Hochschule (Technical University of Berlin), had made a pact. sachen.de – ''Zur Ehrung von Manfred von Ardenne''. The pact was a pledge that whoever first made contact with the Russians would speak for the rest. The objectives of their pact were threefold: (1) Prevent plunder of their institutes, (2) Continue their work with minimal interruption, and (3) Protect themselves from prosecution for any political acts of the past. Heinemann-Grüder, 2002, 44. Before the end of World War II, Thiessen, a member of the Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei (NSDAP), had Communist contacts. Hentschel, 1996, Appendix F; see the entry for Thiessen. On 27 April 1945, Thiessen arrived at von Ardenne’s institute in an armored vehicle with a major of the Soviet Army, who was also a leading Soviet chemist. Oleynikov, 2000, pp 5, 10–13, 18, 21 All four of the pact members were taken to the Soviet Union. Hertz was made head of Institute G, in Agudseri (Agudzery),about 10 km southeast of Sukhumi and a suburb of Gul’rips (Gulrip’shi). Naimark, 1995, 213. Topics assigned to Gustav Hertz’s Institute G included: (1) Separation of isotopes by diffusion in a flow of inert gases, for which Gustav Hertz was the leader, (2) Development of a condensation pump, for which Justus Mühlenpfordt was the leader, (3) Design and build a mass spectrometer for determining the isotopic composition of uranium, for which Werner Schütze was the leader, (4) Development of frameless (ceramic) diffusion partitions for filters, for which Reinhold Reichmann was the leader, and (5) Development of a theory of stability and control of a diffusion cascade, for which Heinz Barwich was the leader; Kruglov, 2002, 131. Barwich had been deputy to Hertz at Siemens. Naimark, 1995, 209. Other members of Institute G were Werner Hartmann (Werner Hartmann (physicist)) and Karl-Franz Zühlke. Maddrell, 2006, 179–180. Von Ardenne was made head of Institute A, Goals of Manfred von Ardenne’s Institute A included: (1) Electromagnetic separation of isotopes, for which von Ardenne was the leader, (2) Techniques for manufacturing porous barriers for isotope separation, for which Peter Adolf Thiessen was the leader, and (3) Molecular techniques for separation of uranium isotopes, for which Max Steenbeck was the leader. In his first meeting with Lavrentij Beria (Lavrentiy Beria), von Ardenne was asked to participate in building the bomb, but von Ardenne quickly realized that participation would prohibit his repatriation to Germany, so he suggested isotope enrichment as an objective, which was agreed to. By the end of the 1940s, nearly 300 Germans were working at the institute, and they were not the total work force. Institute A was used as the basis for the Sukhumi Physical-Technical Institute in Sinop, a suburb of Sukhumi. Volmer went to the Nauchno-Issledovatel’skij Institut-9 (NII-9, Scientific Research Institute No. 9), Today, NII-9 is the Bochvar All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, Bochvar VNIINM. See Oleynikov, 2000, 4. in Moscow; he was given a design bureau to work on the production of heavy water. In Institute A, Thiessen became leader for developing techniques for manufacturing porous barriers for isotope separation. * Meliton Kantaria (1920–1993) sergeant of the Red Army who raised the Soviet victory banner over the Reichstag in Berlin, April 30, 1945 * Geno Adamia (1936–1993) Georgian major general and garrison commander of Sukhumi. Executed with the entire garrison and extermination of the city's population by Abkhazian militia during the Sukhumi massacre. * John Shalikashvili (Poland, 1936–2011) general of the United States, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and supreme commander of NATO forces in Europe. Partially solved Kurdish conflict on the Iraqi-Turkish border saving around 500.000 Kurdish people being displaced. Developed the Joint Vision 10 plan, a template which combined all elements of the United States armed forces to one efficient network of the different combat components. - SSSR-65893 (Transair Georgian Airline Shootdowns (September 1993)) Sukhumi September 21, 1993 Tupolev TU-134 (TU-134) Shot down by the Abkhaz forces in the course of war - - SSSR-85163 (Transair Georgian Airline Shootdowns (September 1993)) Sukhumi September 22, 1993 Tupolev TU-154 Shot down by the Abkhaz forces in the course of war - - SSSR-65001 (Transair Georgian Airline Shootdowns (September 1993)) Sukhumi September 23, 1993 Tupolev TU-154 Shot down by the Abkhaz forces in the course of war - WikiPedia:Sukhumi Commons:Category:Sukhumi


political acts

;sachen.de – ''Zur Ehrung von Manfred von Ardenne''. The pact was a pledge that whoever first made contact with the Russians would speak for the rest. The objectives of their pact were threefold: (1) Prevent plunder of their institutes, (2) Continue their work with minimal interruption, and (3) Protect themselves from prosecution for any political acts of the past. Heinemann-Grüder, 2002, 44. Before the end of World War II, Thiessen, a member of the Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei (NSDAP), had Communist contacts. Hentschel, 1996, Appendix F; see the entry for Thiessen. On 27 April 1945, Thiessen arrived at von Ardenne’s institute in an armored vehicle with a major of the Soviet Army, who was also a leading Soviet chemist. Oleynikov, 2000, pp 5, 10–13, 18, 21 All four of the pact members were taken to the Soviet Union. Hertz was made head of Institute G, in Agudseri (Agudzery),about 10 km southeast of Sukhumi and a suburb of Gul’rips (Gulrip’shi). Naimark, 1995, 213. Topics assigned to Gustav Hertz’s Institute G included: (1) Separation of isotopes by diffusion in a flow of inert gases, for which Gustav Hertz was the leader, (2) Development of a condensation pump, for which Justus Mühlenpfordt was the leader, (3) Design and build a mass spectrometer for determining the isotopic composition of uranium, for which Werner Schütze was the leader, (4) Development of frameless (ceramic) diffusion partitions for filters, for which Reinhold Reichmann was the leader, and (5) Development of a theory of stability and control of a diffusion cascade, for which Heinz Barwich was the leader; Kruglov, 2002, 131. Barwich had been deputy to Hertz at Siemens. Naimark, 1995, 209. Other members of Institute G were Werner Hartmann (Werner Hartmann (physicist)) and Karl-Franz Zühlke. Maddrell, 2006, 179–180. Von Ardenne was made head of Institute A, Goals of Manfred von Ardenne’s Institute A included: (1) Electromagnetic separation of isotopes, for which von Ardenne was the leader, (2) Techniques for manufacturing porous barriers for isotope separation, for which Peter Adolf Thiessen was the leader, and (3) Molecular techniques for separation of uranium isotopes, for which Max Steenbeck was the leader. In his first meeting with Lavrentij Beria (Lavrentiy Beria), von Ardenne was asked to participate in building the bomb, but von Ardenne quickly realized that participation would prohibit his repatriation to Germany, so he suggested isotope enrichment as an objective, which was agreed to. By the end of the 1940s, nearly 300 Germans were working at the institute, and they were not the total work force. Institute A was used as the basis for the Sukhumi Physical-Technical Institute in Sinop, a suburb of Sukhumi. Volmer went to the Nauchno-Issledovatel’skij Institut-9 (NII-9, Scientific Research Institute No. 9), Today, NII-9 is the Bochvar All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, Bochvar VNIINM. See Oleynikov, 2000, 4. in Moscow; he was given a design bureau to work on the production of heavy water. In Institute A, Thiessen became leader for developing techniques for manufacturing porous barriers for isotope separation. The Soviet Union Hertz, who was concerned for his safety and was looking, like his fellow Nobel laureate Franck, to move to the USA or any other place outside Germany, Manfred von Ardenne, director of his private laboratory ''Forschungslaboratorium für Elektronenphysik'', Peter Adolf Thiessen, ordinarius professor at the Humboldt University of Berlin and director of the Kaiser-Wilhelm Institut für physikalische Chemie und Elektrochemie (KWIPC) in Berlin-Dahlem (Dahlem (Berlin)), and Max Volmer, ordinarius professor and director of the Physical Chemistry Institute at the Berlin Technische Hochschule (Technical University of Berlin), had made a pact. sachen.de – ''Zur Ehrung von Manfred von Ardenne''. The pact was a pledge that whoever first made contact with the Russians would speak for the rest. The objectives of their pact were threefold: (1) Prevent plunder of their institutes, (2) Continue their work with minimal interruption, and (3) Protect themselves from prosecution for any political acts of the past. Heinemann-Grüder, 2002, 44. Before the end of World War II, Thiessen, a member of the Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei (NSDAP), had Communist contacts. Hentschel, 1996, Appendix F; see the entry for Thiessen. On 27 April 1945, Thiessen arrived at von Ardenne’s institute in an armored vehicle with a major of the Soviet Army, who was also a leading Soviet chemist. Oleynikov, 2000, pp 5, 10–13, 18, 21 All four of the pact members were taken to the Soviet Union. Hertz was made head of Institute G, in Agudseri (Agudzery),about 10 km southeast of Sukhumi and a suburb of Gul’rips (Gulrip’shi). Naimark, 1995, 213. Topics assigned to Gustav Hertz’s Institute G included: (1) Separation of isotopes by diffusion in a flow of inert gases, for which Gustav Hertz was the leader, (2) Development of a condensation pump, for which Justus Mühlenpfordt was the leader, (3) Design and build a mass spectrometer for determining the isotopic composition of uranium, for which Werner Schütze was the leader, (4) Development of frameless (ceramic) diffusion partitions for filters, for which Reinhold Reichmann was the leader, and (5) Development of a theory of stability and control of a diffusion cascade, for which Heinz Barwich was the leader; Kruglov, 2002, 131. Barwich had been deputy to Hertz at Siemens. Naimark, 1995, 209. Other members of Institute G were Werner Hartmann (Werner Hartmann (physicist)) and Karl-Franz Zühlke. Maddrell, 2006, 179–180. Von Ardenne was made head of Institute A, Goals of Manfred von Ardenne’s Institute A included: (1) Electromagnetic separation of isotopes, for which von Ardenne was the leader, (2) Techniques for manufacturing porous barriers for isotope separation, for which Peter Adolf Thiessen was the leader, and (3) Molecular techniques for separation of uranium isotopes, for which Max Steenbeck was the leader. In his first meeting with Lavrentij Beria (Lavrentiy Beria), von Ardenne was asked to participate in building the bomb, but von Ardenne quickly realized that participation would prohibit his repatriation to Germany, so he suggested isotope enrichment as an objective, which was agreed to. By the end of the 1940s, nearly 300 Germans were working at the institute, and they were not the total work force. Institute A was used as the basis for the Sukhumi Physical-Technical Institute in Sinop, a suburb of Sukhumi. Volmer went to the Nauchno-Issledovatel’skij Institut-9 (NII-9, Scientific Research Institute No. 9), Today, NII-9 is the Bochvar All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, Bochvar VNIINM. See Oleynikov, 2000, 4. in Moscow; he was given a design bureau to work on the production of heavy water. In Institute A, Thiessen became leader for developing techniques for manufacturing porous barriers for isotope separation. * Meliton Kantaria (1920–1993) sergeant of the Red Army who raised the Soviet victory banner over the Reichstag in Berlin, April 30, 1945 * Geno Adamia (1936–1993) Georgian major general and garrison commander of Sukhumi. Executed with the entire garrison and extermination of the city's population by Abkhazian militia during the Sukhumi massacre. * John Shalikashvili (Poland, 1936–2011) general of the United States, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and supreme commander of NATO forces in Europe. Partially solved Kurdish conflict on the Iraqi-Turkish border saving around 500.000 Kurdish people being displaced. Developed the Joint Vision 10 plan, a template which combined all elements of the United States armed forces to one efficient network of the different combat components. - SSSR-65893 (Transair Georgian Airline Shootdowns (September 1993)) Sukhumi September 21, 1993 Tupolev TU-134 (TU-134) Shot down by the Abkhaz forces in the course of war - - SSSR-85163 (Transair Georgian Airline Shootdowns (September 1993)) Sukhumi September 22, 1993 Tupolev TU-154 Shot down by the Abkhaz forces in the course of war - - SSSR-65001 (Transair Georgian Airline Shootdowns (September 1993)) Sukhumi September 23, 1993 Tupolev TU-154 Shot down by the Abkhaz forces in the course of war - WikiPedia:Sukhumi Commons:Category:Sukhumi


causing big

and the sciences, but was considered cunning and devious. The Polytechnicum's curiculum was mostly about the petroleum industry. *1993 – A barge strikes a railroad bridge near Mobile, Alabama, causing the deadliest train wreck (Big Bayou Canot train disaster) in Amtrak history. 47 passengers are killed. *1993 – A Transair Georgian Airlines (Transair Georgian Airline Crash (22 September)) Tu-154 (Tupolev Tu-154) is shot down


original version

that was approved in Russia in autumn 2008, ref


games year

publisher Fizkultura i sport (Fizkultura i sport (publisher)) series Heroes of the Olympic Games year 1978 location Moscow language Russian url http: www.sportlib.ru books la saneev The major success came in 1968, when he won at the USSR Championships and at the 1968 Summer Olympics, where on October 17 he set the World Record twice: to 17.23 m and to 17.39 m.


small original

monastery. *


major success

publisher Fizkultura i sport (Fizkultura i sport (publisher)) series Heroes of the Olympic Games year 1978 location Moscow language Russian url http: www.sportlib.ru books la saneev The major success came in 1968, when he won at the USSR Championships and at the 1968 Summer Olympics, where on October 17 he set the World Record twice: to 17.23 m and to 17.39 m. World Record Progression - Triple Jump. IOC On the same date four years later Saneyev set the World Record once again, now in Sukhumi, to 17.44 m. He won gold medals at the 1972 Summer Olympics and at the 1976 Summer Olympics and a silver at the 1980 Summer Olympics. Demobilized in 1946, he lived thereafter in Sukhumi working as a statal shop manager. Afilied PCUS in 1947. A year after the secessionist war (War in Abkhazia (1992–1993)) in the region had begun he moved with his family to Moscow Izvestia, Сын Героя Советского Союза Мелитона Кантарии Шота: "Отец для прочности древко своим ремнем закрепил", 8.5.2007 WikiPedia:Sukhumi Commons:Category:Sukhumi


training place

cucumbers, peaches and other delicacies intended for the animals phone tollfree fax hours price 150 RUB content Once a research centre and alleged training place for the monkeys sent to the space by the USSR, now it's a pretty sad zoo around a huge monkey sculpture. Unfortunately, animals kept in a torturing conditions. * WikiPedia:Sukhumi Commons:Category:Sukhumi


successful defense

OF DEATH The successful defense against the Arabs, and new territorial gains, gave the Abkhazian princes enough power to claim more autonomy from the Byzantine Empire. Towards circa 786, Leon won his full independence with the help of the Khazars; he assumed the title of ''King of the Abkhazians'' and transferred his capital to the western Georgian city of Kutatisi (modern-day Kutaisi). According to Georgian annals, Leon subdivided his kingdom into eight duchies : Abkhazia proper, Tskhumi (Sukhumi), Bedia (Bedia (Egrisi)), Guria, Racha and Takveri, Svaneti, Argveti, and Kutatisi. Vakhushti Bagrationi, ''The History of Egrisi, Abkhazeti or Imereti'', part 1. He was killed by sniper fire while covering the battle for Sukhumi in Abkhazian war (War in Abkhazia). Mogilevsky died in a plane crash in 1925 headed to Sukhumi conference. The plane, which also carried two other high-ranking Soviet security officials Georgi Atarbekov and Alexander Myasnikov (Aleksandr Myasnikyan), blew up in mid-air not far from Tiflis. The cause of the crash was never determined, despite the fact that three separate commissions later investigated the incident. In 1992, the political situation in Abkhazia changed into the military confrontation between Georgian government and Abkhaz separatists. The fighting escalated as Georgian Interior and Defence Ministry forces (Military of Georgia) along with police units took Sukhumi and came near the city of Gudauta. The ethnically-based policies initiated by the Georgians in Sukhumi created simultaneously refugees and a core of fighters determined to regain lost homes. Human Rights Watch report. Georgia Abkhazia: Violations of the Laws of War and Russia's Role in the Conflict, page 23. Published in March, 1995 However, as the war progressed, the Abkhaz separatist have carried out same policies of violent displacement of ethnic Georgians from their homes in greater proportions which has left 250,000 people being forcefully evicted from their homes. Under the alleged aid from Russia, they managed to re-arm and organize “volunteer battalions” from North Caucasus. According to political analyst Georgy Mirsky, the Russian military base in Gudauta was, “supplying the Abkhazian side with weapons and ammunition.” Georgiy Mirsky. On Ruins of Empire: Ethnicity and Nationalism in the Former Soviet Union, (United States: Greenwood Press 1997),p 73 Furthermore he adds that, “no direct proof of this has ever been offered, but it would be more naïve to believe that the tanks, rockets, howitzers, pieces of ordnance, and other heavy weapons that the anti-Georgian coalition forces were increasing using in their war had been captured from the enemy.” This anti-Georgian military coalition were made up of North Caucasian Group “The Confederates of Mountain People of Caucasus”, Shamil Basaev’s Chechen division “Grey Wolf,” Armenian battalion “Bagramian,” Cossacks, militants from Transnistria and various Russian special units. Goltz Thomas. Georgia Diary: A Chronicle of War and Political Chaos in the Post-Soviet (United States: M.E. Sharpe 2006), 133 The War in Abkhazia (1993 Russian Forces Ethnic Cleansing Campaign) by Svante E. Cornell Allah's Mountains: The Battle for Chechnya, by Sebastian Smith, p 102 Oil and Geopolitics in the Caspian Sea Region, by Michael P. Croissant, Bülent Ara, p 279 Russian Foreign Policy and the CIS: Theories, Debates and Actions by Nicole J. Jackson, p 122 Open Democracy: Abkhazia-Georgia, Kosovo-Serbia: parallel worlds? According to Political Scientist Bruno Coppieters, "Western governments took some diplomatic initiatives in the United Nations and made up an appeal to Moscow to halt an active involvement of its military forces in the conflict. UN Security Council passed series of resolutions in which is appeals for a cease-fire and condemned the Abkhazian policy of ethnic-cleansing." Commonwealth and Independence in Post-Soviet Eurasia Commonwealth and Independence in Post-Soviet Eurasia by Bruno Coppieters, Alekseĭ Zverev, Dmitriĭ Trenin, p 61 birth_date 2 March 1947 birth_place Sukhumi, Abkhazian ASSR, Georgian SSR, USSR death_date WikiPedia:Sukhumi Commons:Category:Sukhumi


attempt made

and it was not until the second half of the 18th century that the ruling Shervashidze family embraced Islam. Until then, Abkhazia, secured from large-scale invasions by its mountainous location and impassable forests, had retained independence and profitted from commerce in traditional Caucasian (Caucasus) commodities, that of slaves not excepted. Aftermath In July 1866 an attempt made by the Russian authorities to collect information concerning the economic conditions of the Abkhaz, for the purpose of taxation, led to a revolt. The rebels proclaimed Michael Shervashidze's son George (Georgi Shervashidze) as prince and marched on Suhum-Kale (Sukhumi). Only the strong Russian reinforcements led by General D. Sviatopolk-Mirskii (Dmitry Ivanovitch Sviatopolk-Mirskii) were able to suppress the revolt by the same August. The harsh Russian reaction led, subsequently, to a considerable emigration of the Abkhaz ''muhajirs (Muhajir (Caucasus))'' to the Ottoman Empire, especially after the locals took part in the rebellion of the Caucasian mountaineers incited by the landing of Turkish troops in 1877. As a result many areas became virtually deserted and the population of Abkhazia was reduced threefold. Murder On June 9, 2004, Aiba's car came under fire, fifty metres from his home in Sukhumi. He got out of the car in an attempt to protect his ten-year old daughter, but was seriously injured, and died later that day in hospital. His death sent shockwaves through Abkhaz politics. Aiba had no business links and many people claimed that the killing was politically motivated. It sparked the resignations of several prominent ministers, including foreign minister (and fellow Amtsakhara leader) Sergey Shamba, interior minister Abessalom Beiya and Givi Agrba, head of the security services. WikiPedia:Sukhumi Commons:Category:Sukhumi

Sukhumi

'''Sukhumi''' or '''Sokhumi''' American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. ( , ''Sukhum'') is a city in western Georgia and the capital of Abkhazia, a disputed region on the Black Sea coast. The city suffered significant damage during the Georgian–Abkhazian conflict in the early 1990s.

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