Sukhumi

What is Sukhumi known for?


political+acts

;sachen.de – ''Zur Ehrung von Manfred von Ardenne''. The pact was a pledge that whoever first made contact with the Russians would speak for the rest. The objectives of their pact were threefold: (1) Prevent plunder of their institutes, (2) Continue their work with minimal interruption, and (3) Protect themselves from prosecution for any political acts of the past. Heinemann-Grüder, 2002, 44. Before the end of World War II, Thiessen, a member of the Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei (NSDAP), had Communist contacts. Hentschel, 1996, Appendix F; see the entry for Thiessen. On 27 April 1945, Thiessen arrived at von Ardenne’s institute in an armored vehicle with a major of the Soviet Army, who was also a leading Soviet chemist. Oleynikov, 2000, pp 5, 10–13, 18, 21 All four of the pact members were taken to the Soviet Union. Hertz was made head of Institute G, in Agudseri (Agudzery),about 10 km southeast of Sukhumi and a suburb of Gul’rips (Gulrip’shi). Naimark, 1995, 213. Topics assigned to Gustav Hertz’s Institute G included: (1) Separation of isotopes by diffusion in a flow of inert gases, for which Gustav Hertz was the leader, (2) Development of a condensation pump, for which Justus Mühlenpfordt was the leader, (3) Design and build a mass spectrometer for determining the isotopic composition of uranium, for which Werner Schütze was the leader, (4) Development of frameless (ceramic) diffusion partitions for filters, for which Reinhold Reichmann was the leader, and (5) Development of a theory of stability and control of a diffusion cascade, for which Heinz Barwich was the leader; Kruglov, 2002, 131. Barwich had been deputy to Hertz at Siemens. Naimark, 1995, 209. Other members of Institute G were Werner Hartmann (Werner Hartmann (physicist)) and Karl-Franz Zühlke. Maddrell, 2006, 179–180. Von Ardenne was made head of Institute A, Goals of Manfred von Ardenne’s Institute A included: (1) Electromagnetic separation of isotopes, for which von Ardenne was the leader, (2) Techniques for manufacturing porous barriers for isotope separation, for which Peter Adolf Thiessen was the leader, and (3) Molecular techniques for separation of uranium isotopes, for which Max Steenbeck was the leader. In his first meeting with Lavrentij Beria (Lavrentiy Beria), von Ardenne was asked to participate in building the bomb, but von Ardenne quickly realized that participation would prohibit his repatriation to Germany, so he suggested isotope enrichment as an objective, which was agreed to. By the end of the 1940s, nearly 300 Germans were working at the institute, and they were not the total work force. Institute A was used as the basis for the Sukhumi Physical-Technical Institute in Sinop, a suburb of Sukhumi. Volmer went to the Nauchno-Issledovatel’skij Institut-9 (NII-9, Scientific Research Institute No. 9), Today, NII-9 is the Bochvar All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, Bochvar VNIINM. See Oleynikov, 2000, 4. in Moscow; he was given a design bureau to work on the production of heavy water. In Institute A, Thiessen became leader for developing techniques for manufacturing porous barriers for isotope separation. The Soviet Union Hertz, who was concerned for his safety and was looking, like his fellow Nobel laureate Franck, to move to the USA or any other place outside Germany, Manfred von Ardenne, director of his private laboratory ''Forschungslaboratorium für Elektronenphysik'', Peter Adolf Thiessen, ordinarius professor at the Humboldt University of Berlin and director of the Kaiser-Wilhelm Institut für physikalische Chemie und Elektrochemie (KWIPC) in Berlin-Dahlem (Dahlem (Berlin)), and Max Volmer, ordinarius professor and director of the Physical Chemistry Institute at the Berlin Technische Hochschule (Technical University of Berlin), had made a pact. sachen.de – ''Zur Ehrung von Manfred von Ardenne''. The pact was a pledge that whoever first made contact with the Russians would speak for the rest. The objectives of their pact were threefold: (1) Prevent plunder of their institutes, (2) Continue their work with minimal interruption, and (3) Protect themselves from prosecution for any political acts of the past. Heinemann-Grüder, 2002, 44. Before the end of World War II, Thiessen, a member of the Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei (NSDAP), had Communist contacts. Hentschel, 1996, Appendix F; see the entry for Thiessen. On 27 April 1945, Thiessen arrived at von Ardenne’s institute in an armored vehicle with a major of the Soviet Army, who was also a leading Soviet chemist. Oleynikov, 2000, pp 5, 10–13, 18, 21 All four of the pact members were taken to the Soviet Union. Hertz was made head of Institute G, in Agudseri (Agudzery),about 10 km southeast of Sukhumi and a suburb of Gul’rips (Gulrip’shi). Naimark, 1995, 213. Topics assigned to Gustav Hertz’s Institute G included: (1) Separation of isotopes by diffusion in a flow of inert gases, for which Gustav Hertz was the leader, (2) Development of a condensation pump, for which Justus Mühlenpfordt was the leader, (3) Design and build a mass spectrometer for determining the isotopic composition of uranium, for which Werner Schütze was the leader, (4) Development of frameless (ceramic) diffusion partitions for filters, for which Reinhold Reichmann was the leader, and (5) Development of a theory of stability and control of a diffusion cascade, for which Heinz Barwich was the leader; Kruglov, 2002, 131. Barwich had been deputy to Hertz at Siemens. Naimark, 1995, 209. Other members of Institute G were Werner Hartmann (Werner Hartmann (physicist)) and Karl-Franz Zühlke. Maddrell, 2006, 179–180. Von Ardenne was made head of Institute A, Goals of Manfred von Ardenne’s Institute A included: (1) Electromagnetic separation of isotopes, for which von Ardenne was the leader, (2) Techniques for manufacturing porous barriers for isotope separation, for which Peter Adolf Thiessen was the leader, and (3) Molecular techniques for separation of uranium isotopes, for which Max Steenbeck was the leader. In his first meeting with Lavrentij Beria (Lavrentiy Beria), von Ardenne was asked to participate in building the bomb, but von Ardenne quickly realized that participation would prohibit his repatriation to Germany, so he suggested isotope enrichment as an objective, which was agreed to. By the end of the 1940s, nearly 300 Germans were working at the institute, and they were not the total work force. Institute A was used as the basis for the Sukhumi Physical-Technical Institute in Sinop, a suburb of Sukhumi. Volmer went to the Nauchno-Issledovatel’skij Institut-9 (NII-9, Scientific Research Institute No. 9), Today, NII-9 is the Bochvar All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, Bochvar VNIINM. See Oleynikov, 2000, 4. in Moscow; he was given a design bureau to work on the production of heavy water. In Institute A, Thiessen became leader for developing techniques for manufacturing porous barriers for isotope separation. * Meliton Kantaria (1920–1993) sergeant of the Red Army who raised the Soviet victory banner over the Reichstag in Berlin, April 30, 1945 * Geno Adamia (1936–1993) Georgian major general and garrison commander of Sukhumi. Executed with the entire garrison and extermination of the city's population by Abkhazian militia during the Sukhumi massacre. * John Shalikashvili (Poland, 1936–2011) general of the United States, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and supreme commander of NATO forces in Europe. Partially solved Kurdish conflict on the Iraqi-Turkish border saving around 500.000 Kurdish people being displaced. Developed the Joint Vision 10 plan, a template which combined all elements of the United States armed forces to one efficient network of the different combat components. - SSSR-65893 (Transair Georgian Airline Shootdowns (September 1993)) Sukhumi September 21, 1993 Tupolev TU-134 (TU-134) Shot down by the Abkhaz forces in the course of war - - SSSR-85163 (Transair Georgian Airline Shootdowns (September 1993)) Sukhumi September 22, 1993 Tupolev TU-154 Shot down by the Abkhaz forces in the course of war - - SSSR-65001 (Transair Georgian Airline Shootdowns (September 1993)) Sukhumi September 23, 1993 Tupolev TU-154 Shot down by the Abkhaz forces in the course of war - WikiPedia:Sukhumi Commons:Category:Sukhumi


frequent performances

was intentionally left untouched. Currently it operates as a monastery, they sell some basic souvenirs, books and maintain a smallish monastery hotel. Do thumb right The Botanical Gardens (File:Pond in botanical garden.jpg) * Swim at the moderately well maintained pebble '''beach'''. *


original version

that was approved in Russia in autumn 2008, ref


major success

publisher Fizkultura i sport (Fizkultura i sport (publisher)) series Heroes of the Olympic Games year 1978 location Moscow language Russian url http: www.sportlib.ru books la saneev The major success came in 1968, when he won at the USSR Championships and at the 1968 Summer Olympics, where on October 17 he set the World Record twice: to 17.23 m and to 17.39 m. World Record Progression - Triple Jump. IOC On the same date four years later Saneyev set the World Record once again, now in Sukhumi, to 17.44 m. He won gold medals at the 1972 Summer Olympics and at the 1976 Summer Olympics and a silver at the 1980 Summer Olympics. Demobilized in 1946, he lived thereafter in Sukhumi working as a statal shop manager. Afilied PCUS in 1947. A year after the secessionist war (War in Abkhazia (1992–1993)) in the region had begun he moved with his family to Moscow Izvestia, Сын Героя Советского Союза Мелитона Кантарии Шота: "Отец для прочности древко своим ремнем закрепил", 8.5.2007 WikiPedia:Sukhumi Commons:Category:Sukhumi


time main

time Main sights thumb Medieval Besleti Bridge bridge (File:Beslet bridge.JPG) over the Besletka river known as the Queen Tamar (Tamar of Georgia) Bridge. Sukhumi houses a number of historical monuments, notably the Beslet arcaded bridge built during the reign of queen Tamar of Georgia in the 12th century. It also retains visible vestiges of the defunct monuments, including the Roman walls, the 11th-century castle of Bagrat III, several towers of the Kelasuri Wall Great


bold short

, the first of 2,751 '''Liberty ships''' built during World War II by the United States, was launched. 2008 – During the '''''Shenzhou 7''''' mission, Zhai Zhigang became the first People's Republic of China Chinese


historic population

2011 Demographics Historic population figures for Sukhumi, split out by ethnicity, based on population censuses: Population censuses in Abkhazia: 1886, 1926, 1939, 1959, 1970, 1979, 1989, 2003 WikiPedia:Sukhumi Commons:Category:Sukhumi


active involvement

: Abkhazia-Georgia, Kosovo-Serbia: parallel worlds? According to Political Scientist Bruno Coppieters, "Western governments took some diplomatic initiatives in the United Nations and made up an appeal to Moscow to halt an active involvement of its military forces in the conflict. UN Security Council passed series of resolutions in which is appeals for a cease-fire and condemned the Abkhazian policy of ethnic-cleansing." Commonwealth and Independence in Post-Soviet


related style

-1600-5. Neo-Byzantine architecture had a small following in the wake of the 19th-century Gothic revival, resulting in such jewels as Westminster Cathedral in London, and in Bristol from about 1850 to 1880 a related style known as Bristol Byzantine was popular for industrial buildings which combined elements of the Byzantine style with Moorish architecture. It was developed on a wide-scale basis in Russia during the reign of Alexander II (Alexander II of Russia) by Grigory Gagarin and his followers who designed St Volodymyr's Cathedral in Kiev, St Nicholas Naval Cathedral (:Image:Kronstadt Naval Cathedral 1.jpg) in Kronstadt, Alexander Nevsky Cathedral in Sofia, Saint Mark's church (St. Mark's Church, Belgrade) in Belgrade and the New Athos Monastery in New Athos near Sukhumi. The largest Neo-Byzantine project of the 20th century was the Temple of Saint Sava in Belgrade. - SUI UGSS Sukhumi Dranda Airport Sukhumi, Georgia (Georgia (country)) - - bgcolor "#F9F9F9" 1. align "left" Sukhumi align "left" Аҟәа სოხუმი 119,200 39,100 align "left" Sukhumi District - bgcolor "#F9F9F9" The Soviet Union Hertz, who was concerned for his safety and was looking, like his fellow Nobel laureate Franck, to move to the USA or any other place outside Germany, Manfred von Ardenne, director of his private laboratory ''Forschungslaboratorium für Elektronenphysik'', Peter Adolf Thiessen, ordinarius professor at the Humboldt University of Berlin and director of the Kaiser-Wilhelm Institut für physikalische Chemie und Elektrochemie (KWIPC) in Berlin-Dahlem (Dahlem (Berlin)), and Max Volmer, ordinarius professor and director of the Physical Chemistry Institute at the Berlin Technische Hochschule (Technical University of Berlin), had made a pact. sachen.de – ''Zur Ehrung von Manfred von Ardenne''. The pact was a pledge that whoever first made contact with the Russians would speak for the rest. The objectives of their pact were threefold: (1) Prevent plunder of their institutes, (2) Continue their work with minimal interruption, and (3) Protect themselves from prosecution for any political acts of the past. Heinemann-Grüder, 2002, 44. Before the end of World War II, Thiessen, a member of the Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei (NSDAP), had Communist contacts. Hentschel, 1996, Appendix F; see the entry for Thiessen. On 27 April 1945, Thiessen arrived at von Ardenne’s institute in an armored vehicle with a major of the Soviet Army, who was also a leading Soviet chemist. Oleynikov, 2000, pp 5, 10–13, 18, 21 All four of the pact members were taken to the Soviet Union. Hertz was made head of Institute G, in Agudseri (Agudzery),about 10 km southeast of Sukhumi and a suburb of Gul’rips (Gulrip’shi). Naimark, 1995, 213. Topics assigned to Gustav Hertz’s Institute G included: (1) Separation of isotopes by diffusion in a flow of inert gases, for which Gustav Hertz was the leader, (2) Development of a condensation pump, for which Justus Mühlenpfordt was the leader, (3) Design and build a mass spectrometer for determining the isotopic composition of uranium, for which Werner Schütze was the leader, (4) Development of frameless (ceramic) diffusion partitions for filters, for which Reinhold Reichmann was the leader, and (5) Development of a theory of stability and control of a diffusion cascade, for which Heinz Barwich was the leader; Kruglov, 2002, 131. Barwich had been deputy to Hertz at Siemens. Naimark, 1995, 209. Other members of Institute G were Werner Hartmann (Werner Hartmann (physicist)) and Karl-Franz Zühlke. Maddrell, 2006, 179–180. Von Ardenne was made head of Institute A, Goals of Manfred von Ardenne’s Institute A included: (1) Electromagnetic separation of isotopes, for which von Ardenne was the leader, (2) Techniques for manufacturing porous barriers for isotope separation, for which Peter Adolf Thiessen was the leader, and (3) Molecular techniques for separation of uranium isotopes, for which Max Steenbeck was the leader. In his first meeting with Lavrentij Beria (Lavrentiy Beria), von Ardenne was asked to participate in building the bomb, but von Ardenne quickly realized that participation would prohibit his repatriation to Germany, so he suggested isotope enrichment as an objective, which was agreed to. By the end of the 1940s, nearly 300 Germans were working at the institute, and they were not the total work force. Institute A was used as the basis for the Sukhumi Physical-Technical Institute in Sinop, a suburb of Sukhumi. Volmer went to the Nauchno-Issledovatel’skij Institut-9 (NII-9, Scientific Research Institute No. 9), Today, NII-9 is the Bochvar All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, Bochvar VNIINM. See Oleynikov, 2000, 4. in Moscow; he was given a design bureau to work on the production of heavy water. In Institute A, Thiessen became leader for developing techniques for manufacturing porous barriers for isotope separation. The Soviet Union Hertz, who was concerned for his safety and was looking, like his fellow Nobel laureate Franck, to move to the USA or any other place outside Germany, Manfred von Ardenne, director of his private laboratory ''Forschungslaboratorium für Elektronenphysik'', Peter Adolf Thiessen, ordinarius professor at the Humboldt University of Berlin and director of the Kaiser-Wilhelm Institut für physikalische Chemie und Elektrochemie (KWIPC) in Berlin-Dahlem (Dahlem (Berlin)), and Max Volmer, ordinarius professor and director of the Physical Chemistry Institute at the Berlin Technische Hochschule (Technical University of Berlin), had made a pact. sachen.de – ''Zur Ehrung von Manfred von Ardenne''. The pact was a pledge that whoever first made contact with the Russians would speak for the rest. The objectives of their pact were threefold: (1) Prevent plunder of their institutes, (2) Continue their work with minimal interruption, and (3) Protect themselves from prosecution for any political acts of the past. Heinemann-Grüder, 2002, 44. Before the end of World War II, Thiessen, a member of the Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei (NSDAP), had Communist contacts. Hentschel, 1996, Appendix F; see the entry for Thiessen. On 27 April 1945, Thiessen arrived at von Ardenne’s institute in an armored vehicle with a major of the Soviet Army, who was also a leading Soviet chemist. Oleynikov, 2000, pp 5, 10–13, 18, 21 All four of the pact members were taken to the Soviet Union. Hertz was made head of Institute G, in Agudseri (Agudzery),about 10 km southeast of Sukhumi and a suburb of Gul’rips (Gulrip’shi). Naimark, 1995, 213. Topics assigned to Gustav Hertz’s Institute G included: (1) Separation of isotopes by diffusion in a flow of inert gases, for which Gustav Hertz was the leader, (2) Development of a condensation pump, for which Justus Mühlenpfordt was the leader, (3) Design and build a mass spectrometer for determining the isotopic composition of uranium, for which Werner Schütze was the leader, (4) Development of frameless (ceramic) diffusion partitions for filters, for which Reinhold Reichmann was the leader, and (5) Development of a theory of stability and control of a diffusion cascade, for which Heinz Barwich was the leader; Kruglov, 2002, 131. Barwich had been deputy to Hertz at Siemens. Naimark, 1995, 209. Other members of Institute G were Werner Hartmann (Werner Hartmann (physicist)) and Karl-Franz Zühlke. Maddrell, 2006, 179–180. Von Ardenne was made head of Institute A, Goals of Manfred von Ardenne’s Institute A included: (1) Electromagnetic separation of isotopes, for which von Ardenne was the leader, (2) Techniques for manufacturing porous barriers for isotope separation, for which Peter Adolf Thiessen was the leader, and (3) Molecular techniques for separation of uranium isotopes, for which Max Steenbeck was the leader. In his first meeting with Lavrentij Beria (Lavrentiy Beria), von Ardenne was asked to participate in building the bomb, but von Ardenne quickly realized that participation would prohibit his repatriation to Germany, so he suggested isotope enrichment as an objective, which was agreed to. By the end of the 1940s, nearly 300 Germans were working at the institute, and they were not the total work force. Institute A was used as the basis for the Sukhumi Physical-Technical Institute in Sinop, a suburb of Sukhumi. Volmer went to the Nauchno-Issledovatel’skij Institut-9 (NII-9, Scientific Research Institute No. 9), Today, NII-9 is the Bochvar All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, Bochvar VNIINM. See Oleynikov, 2000, 4. in Moscow; he was given a design bureau to work on the production of heavy water. In Institute A, Thiessen became leader for developing techniques for manufacturing porous barriers for isotope separation. * Meliton Kantaria (1920–1993) sergeant of the Red Army who raised the Soviet victory banner over the Reichstag in Berlin, April 30, 1945 * Geno Adamia (1936–1993) Georgian major general and garrison commander of Sukhumi. Executed with the entire garrison and extermination of the city's population by Abkhazian militia during the Sukhumi massacre. * John Shalikashvili (Poland, 1936–2011) general of the United States, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and supreme commander of NATO forces in Europe. Partially solved Kurdish conflict on the Iraqi-Turkish border saving around 500.000 Kurdish people being displaced. Developed the Joint Vision 10 plan, a template which combined all elements of the United States armed forces to one efficient network of the different combat components. - SSSR-65893 (Transair Georgian Airline Shootdowns (September 1993)) Sukhumi September 21, 1993 Tupolev TU-134 (TU-134) Shot down by the Abkhaz forces in the course of war - - SSSR-85163 (Transair Georgian Airline Shootdowns (September 1993)) Sukhumi September 22, 1993 Tupolev TU-154 Shot down by the Abkhaz forces in the course of war - - SSSR-65001 (Transair Georgian Airline Shootdowns (September 1993)) Sukhumi September 23, 1993 Tupolev TU-154 Shot down by the Abkhaz forces in the course of war - WikiPedia:Sukhumi Commons:Category:Sukhumi


international black

in 1840, one of the oldest botanical gardens in the Caucasus. The city has a number of research institutes, the Abkhazian State University and the Sukhum Open Institute. From 1945 to 1954 the city's electron physics laboratory was involved in the Soviet program to develop nuclear weapons. The city is a member of the International Black Sea Club. International Black Sea Club, members History File:Gamba - view of sukhumi

Sukhumi

'''Sukhumi''' or '''Sokhumi''' American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. ( , ''Sukhum'') is a city in western Georgia and the capital of Abkhazia, a disputed region on the Black Sea coast. The city suffered significant damage during the Georgian–Abkhazian conflict in the early 1990s.

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