South Africa

What is South Africa known for?


black school

WikiPedia:South Africa Dmoz:Regional Africa South Africa Commons:Category:South Africa


bass music

to the foundation of the World Archaeological Congress. He wrote about the moral issues involved in his most personal work, ''Academic Freedom and Apartheid''. '''Counterstrike''' is a drum and bass music producer duo from Cape Town consisting of Justin Scholtemeyer and Eaton Crous IMO Records "Counterstrike Biography", IMO Records, London, 25 October 2011. Retrieved on 23 November 2011. ref>


low scores

of attitude encouraged by Alec Bedser and Jim Laker, he forsaked the big hitting of his youth and became a stonewaller, making runs with the minimum of risk. This required endless net-practice and training at Gover's cricket school, but by 1958 Barrington emerged as one of the best batsmen in England. pp. 31–35, Peel South Africa 1960 Barrington made six 50s in his first ten innings for Surrey, but then had a string of low scores and was made tweflth man for the First Test against South Africa (South African cricket team in England in 1960). This hit him deeply and he told Micky Stewart "They'll never be able to leave me out again, I am going to see to that". p. 50, Peel Even ''Wisden'' noted that being dropped "seemed to weight on him and his disdained the slightest risk" p. 52, Peel He made 126, 63 and 62 in his next three matches and was back in the team for the Second Test at Lords, famous for the South African bowler Geoff Griffin taking a hat-trick and being no-balled out of Test cricket. Barrington made only 24 in England's innings victory, top-scored with 80 in the Third Test and hit the winning run after being missed in the slips before scoring. He top-scored in both innings in the Fourth Test with 76 and 35 and was dismissed by Trevor Goddard (Trevor Goddard (cricketer)) for the fourth time in a row. He failed in the Fifth Test, but England won 3–0 and Barrington ended with 227 runs (37.83). There was no tour that winter, so he went to Rhodesia and South Africa with the International Cavaliers, under Richie Benaud, who taught him the flipper (wrist spin), and he became friends with Bobby Simpson (Bob Simpson (cricketer)). pp. 50–52, Peel '''Justin Peter Rose''' (born 30 July 1980) is a South African-born English professional golfer who plays most of his golf on the PGA Tour, while keeping his membership on the European Tour. He first came to prominence at the 1998 Open Championship where he holed a dramatic shot from the rough at the final hole to finish in a tie for fourth place. He won the 2007 Order of Merit on the European Tour and was ranked in the World (Official World Golf Ranking) top ten for 34 weeks between November 2007 and July 2008, with a highest ranking of six. In March 2012, Rose won his first World Golf Championship event at the WGC-Cadillac Championship. This was the biggest win of his career, and as a result he re-entered the World top ten at number seven. Early life Rose was born in Johannesburg, South Africa, and moved to England at the age of five where he started to play golf seriously at Hartley Wintney GC, near his then Hampshire home. Rose broke 70 for the first time at the age of 11, and was a plus one handicap by 14. He played in the Walker Cup in 1997 as a 17-year-old. Shortly after that event, Rose burst to world-wide prominence at The Open Championship in 1998. He holed a dramatic shot from the rough from about 50 yards for birdie on the 18th hole, to finish in a tie for fourth. He won the silver medal for the low amateur. The following day he turned professional. White settlers in South Africa thought that the Khoi-San natives gabbled nonsense syllables, and so called them "Hottentots (Khoikhoi)." thumb left Australians and New Zealanders at Klerksdorp, 24 March 1901 by Charles Hammond. (Image:Australians and New Zealanders at Klerksdorp 24 March 1901 by Charles Hammond.jpg) British encroachment into areas of South Africa already settled by the Afrikaner (Afrikaners) Boers and the competition for resources and land that developed between them as a result, led to the Second Boer War in 1899. Pre-empting the deployment of British forces, the Afrikaner Republics of the Orange Free State and the Transvaal Republic (South African Republic) under President Paul Kruger declared war on 11 October 1899, striking deep into the British territories of Natal (Colony of Natal) and the Cape Colony. Odgers 1994, pp. 28–31. After the outbreak of war, plans for the dispatch of a combined Australian force were subsequently set aside by the British War Office and each of the six colonial governments sent separate contingents to serve with British formations, with two squadrons each of 125 men from New South Wales and Victoria, and one each from the other colonies. Odgers 1994, p. 32. The first troops arrived three weeks later, with the New South Wales Lancers—who had been training in England before the war, hurriedly diverted to South Africa. On 22 November, the Lancers came under fire for the first time near Belmont (Battle of Belmont (1899)), and they subsequently forced their attackers to withdraw after inflicting significant casualties on them. Odgers 1994, p. 33. Subsequent films have included ''An Inconvenient Truth'', ''American Gun'', ''Fast Food Nation'', and ''The World According to Sesame Street''. ''An Inconvenient Truth'' won two Oscars in 2007 and has been credited with extending the public debate over climate change. Other films in 2007 included ''Charlie Wilson's War'' with Tom Hanks and Julia Roberts, ''The Kite Runner'' directed by Marc Forster, ''Angels in the Dust'' about an AIDS orphanage in South Africa, ''Darfur Now'' about the genocide in Darfur with Don Cheadle, and ''Jimmy Carter Man from Plains'', a film about Jimmy Carter directed by Academy Award winning director Jonathan Demme. Both civilian and military versions of the Super Frelon were built, with the military variants being the most numerous by far, entering service with the French military as well as being exported to Israel, South Africa, Libya, China and Iraq. Early life Smith was born in London, England and educated at Charterhouse School and St John's College, Cambridge. ''Anglo-African Who's Who'' WikiPedia:South Africa Dmoz:Regional Africa South Africa Commons:Category:South Africa


significant partnership

to a new yard upstream from the Woodside Ferry (Woodside, Merseyside), where it remained. '''Monash University's South Africa campus''' was opened in 2001. It was first foreign university established in South Africa. It is located on a 100 hectare site in Ruimsig in north-west Johannesburg, in the province of Gauteng. It has been described by one high-ranking Australian official as Australia's most significant partnership with Africa in any sphere. http


abundant simple

'''Amatola''', '''Amatole''' or '''Amathole''' are a range of densely forested mountains, situated in the Eastern Cape province of South Africa. The word ''Amatole'' means ''"calves"'', and Amathole District Municipality, which lies to the south, is named after these mountains. Natural history Part the 'Amatola and Stormberg (Stormberg Mountains)' region, they form the eastern end of the great Cape coastal mountain range, rising over 1,800 metres above sea level. Their slopes are densely covered in ancient forests (Knysna-Amatole montane forests) of yellowwoods, white stinkwoods, Cape chestnuts and other indigenous trees. Deep indigenous woods (Knysna-Amatole montane forests) like Kologha and Kubusie are some of the largest swaths of forest in South Africa. The mountains are capped with flower-rich montane grassland. Albany thickets also feature prominently in the surrounding area. Kalahari Acacia-Baikiaea woodlands Botswana, Namibia, South Africa, Zimbabwe - Southern Africa bushveld Botswana, South Africa, Zimbabwe - Zambezian and Mopane woodlands Botswana, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia, Zimbabwe - Drakensberg montane grasslands, woodlands and forests Lesotho, South Africa, Swaziland - Maputaland-Pondoland bushland and thickets Mozambique, South Africa, Swaziland - Two years later, Peretti and Creatore signed a contract with RCA Records where they produced crooner Perry Como. In addition, they produced Sam Cooke and Ray Peterson and wrote English lyrics for the song Rondo Histriae, mixed choir from Croatia chant The Lion Sleep Tonight - (video) "The Lion Sleeps Tonight" (with the original bulk of the song written by Solomon Linda), producing the hit for The Tokens. With George David Weiss they co-wrote "Can't Help Falling in Love" for RCA's mega-star, Elvis Presley. Peretti and Creatore also wrote the Presley hit single ''Wild in the Country''. He and Creatore left RCA in 1964 to join George David Weiss in writing a musical about the American Civil War. Titled ''Maggie Flynn'', it ran on Broadway (Broadway theatre) in 1968. The family of South African composer Solomon Linda reached a settlement (Solomon Linda#Settlement) in the lawsuit over his world-famous song "The Lion Sleeps Tonight," in 2006. CBC News: "South African family settles 'Lion Sleeps Tonight' lawsuit" *...that the Christmas carol ''Carol of the Bells'' was originally a Ukrainian (Ukraine) New Year's (New Year) carol (carol (music)) called '''''Shchedryk'''''? *...that '''Thomas Vorster''', an alleged white supremacist (white supremacy) terrorist in South Africa, was accused of plotting to throw poisoned orange (orange (fruit))s into the streets of Soweto? '''Roger Goode''' is a South African DJ (Disc jockey) who rose to local fame for his first single (single (music)) "In The Beginning", which featured on 5FM's Top 40. This later led to him being signed up with a local dance (dance music) record label, SheerDance (Sheer Music), under which he released his first album, ''Coming Up for Air'' in 2001. thumb right 150px Logo of Sheer Music, South Africa's largest dance music record label (Image:Sheermusic_logo.jpg) '''Sheer Music''' is a South African record label that focuses primarily on club, dance (dance music) and trance (trance music) tracks, and is one of the biggest distributors of dance music in South Africa. Sheer Music (also known as SheerDance) represents local and aspiring DJs and artists, often through collaboration with local radio stations such as 5FM. *...that the '''1st and Ten (1st & Ten (graphics system))''' System creates the yellow line seen on American football telecasts which shows where a team will earn a first down? *...that '''Charles Nqakula''', the Minister of Safety and Security of South Africa and chairperson of the SACP (South African Communist Party) underwent military training in Angola, East Germany, and the Soviet Union in order to fight in Umkhonto we Sizwe, the armed wing of the ANC (African National Congress)? *...that the '''Gourd Dance''' is performed to "


academic publications

, the serial comma tends not to be used in non-academic publications unless its absence produces ambiguity. Many academic publishers (for example, Cambridge University Press, for books published in the UK) also avoid it, though some academic publishing houses in these countries do use it. The Australian Government Publishing Service's ''Style Manual for Authors, Editors and Printers'' (6th edition, 2002) recommends against it, except "to ensure clarity"


current personal

-religiosos UCKG Angola Website news WikiPedia:South Africa Dmoz:Regional Africa South Africa Commons:Category:South Africa


carrying oil

Minister. Later in February, the British government and world press began focusing on tankers carrying oil for Rhodesia when on 25 February, the Rhodesian Commerce and Industry Minister announced that a tanker with oil for Rhodesia would soon arrive. where ''M'' is a positive constant and ''D'' is a constant, called the dimension, greater than or equal to 1. Intuitively, if a coastline looks smooth it should have dimension close to 1; and the more irregular the coastline looks the closer its


academic title

of February 26–27, 1881. His motive for occupying the hill remains unclear. The Boers believed that he may have been attempting to outflank their positions at Laing's Nek. '''Valedictorian''' is an academic title conferred upon the student who delivers the closing or farewell statement at a graduation ceremony. Usually, the valedictorian is the highest ranked student among those graduating from an educational institution.


commercial single

. In Argentina, BMG released "I Think I'm Paranoid" as a commercial single, where it had reached #4 on their airplay charts. Argentina was the only Latin American country to see a commercial release. In Chile, "..Paranoid" reached #4 and spent five weeks in the airplay top ten; while in Venezuela the single spent thirteen weeks on their airplay charts. In Mexico, "...Paranoid" reached the airplay top five. Over in South Africa, "..Paranoid" was the #1 track on two radio stations, including 5FM. White Records (Mushroom Records) released "I Think I'm Paranoid" in Australia and New Zealand on July 27 as a two CD set. In Australia, the song peaked at #57, over a five week chart run, however in New Zealand, the song debuted at #29, before peaking on its second of five weeks at #19. Australia's Channel V and Triple-J radio heavily supported "...Paranoid". Recording thumb left Garbage recording with David Arnold (Image:ShirleyMansonBondstudio.png) at London's Metropolis Studios. alt The inside of a music studio. Four man sit in front of a soundboard, while a woman wearing a red shirt stands inside the recording booth. Garbage, who were in the middle of a European concert tour, and Arnold co-produced the string arrangement (String section) for the song over the phone. The band were anxious that the right keys (Key (music)) and tempo were considered before they could schedule a window in their itinery to record their parts. The band set up a portable digital studio (Pro Tools) to record material to present to Arnold from wherever in Europe they were performing. The strings would have to be finalised and recorded before Manson could sing her parts, as the string arrangement carried the structure of the song. WikiPedia:South Africa Dmoz:Regional Africa South Africa Commons:Category:South Africa

South Africa

'''South Africa''', officially the '''Republic of South Africa''' ('''RSA'''), is a country located in Southern Africa. It has South Africa is the 25th-largest country (List of countries and outlying territories by total area) in the world by land area, and with close to 53 million people (Demographics of South Africa), is the world's 25th-most populous nation (List of countries by population).

South Africa is a multiethnic society encompassing a wide variety of cultures, languages, and religions. Its pluralistic makeup is reflected in the constitution (Constitution of South Africa)'s recognition of 11 official languages, which is among the highest number of any country in the world. Two of these languages are of European origin: English (South African English) and Afrikaans, the latter originating from Dutch (Dutch language) and serving as the first language of most white (White South African) and coloured South Africans. Though English is commonly used in public and commercial life, it is only the fourth most-spoken first language.

About 80 percent of South Africans are of black (black people) African ancestry,

The country is one of the few in Africa never to have had a coup d'état, and regular elections (Elections in South Africa) have been held for almost a century; however, the vast majority of black South Africans were not enfranchised until 1994. Racial strife between the white minority and the black majority has played a large part in the country's recent history and politics. Apartheid was instituted in 1948 by the National Party (National Party (South Africa)), though racial segregation existed prior to that date. Discriminatory laws began to be repealed or abolished from 1990 onwards after a long and sometimes violent struggle by the African National Congress and other anti-apartheid activists.

South Africa is ranked as an upper-middle income economy by the World Bank, and is considered to be a newly industrialised country (newly industrialized country).

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