Siwa Oasis

What is Siwa Oasis known for?


Fathi

-born anthropologist Fathi Malim included reference to Siwan homosexuality (especially a love poem from a man to a youth) in his book ''Oasis Siwa'' (2001), the tribal council demanded that he blank out the material in the current edition of the book and remove it from future editions, or be expelled from the community. Malim reluctantly agreed and physically deleted the passages

'',"the Little Eid") and Eid al-Adha (''lʕid azuwwar'',"the Big Eid"). Unlike other Egyptians, however, on Id al-Adha Siwis cook the skin of the sheep (along with its innards) as a festival delicacy, after removing the hair. Ahmed Fakhry. 1973. ''Siwa Oasis'', Cairo: AUC, p. 64 They also eat palm hearts (''agroz''). Fathi Malim. 2001. ''Oasis Siwa: from the Inside. Traditions, customs, and magic''. Al Katan Dar al Kutub. p. 34 ref

collectively, with funds gathered by the oasis' mosques. Malim 2001:29 Siwi children traditionally also celebrated Ashura (Day of Ashura) by lighting torches, singing, and exchanging sweets. Fakhry 1973:67 Adults' celebration was limited to the preparation of a large meal. Relations with other ethnic groups Siwis are preferentially endogamous (endogamy), only rarely marrying non-Siwis. Fathi Malim. 2001


de construction

view of the Siwa Oasis in 2005 References , de Vincent Battesti, ''in'' Benfoughal T. et Boulay S. (dirs), ''Journal des Africanistes'', ''Sahara : identités et mutations sociales en objets'', Paris, Sociétés des Africanistes, 2006, Tome 76, fascicule 1, p.&


traditional silver

Mary Vale, 2011, Sand and Silver, 61–70. The arrival of the road and of television exposed the oasis to the styles and fashions of the outside world and the traditional silver ornaments were gradually replaced by gold. Evidence of the old styles and traditions are however still in evidence in the women’s embroidery and costume. Margaret Mary Vale, 2011, Sand and Silver Festivals Like other Muslim Egyptians, Siwis celebrate Eid al-Fitr (''lʕid ahakkik


strong relationship

الإسرائيليين وهذه المناطق في الواحة المصرية" (ie: "the third reason is that some people of Siwa protested about a previous episode because one of the guests spoke of a strong relationship between Israelis and these parts of the Egyptian oases" The File: The Egyptian Oasis of Siwa: Hidden Heritage, Al Jazeera, 5 November 2010 the program's host produced an episode about the history and Berber heritage


related

worn by women to weddings and important occasions. These pieces were decorated with symbols which related to Siwa’s history and beliefs and attitudes. Margaret Mary Vale, 2011, Sand and Silver: Jewellery, Costume and Life in Siwa Oasis, London:Kelim Tourism has in recent decades become a vital source of income. Much attention has been given to creating hotels that use local materials and play on local styles.

was officially added to Egypt by Muhammad Ali of Egypt in 1819. The Siwans are a Berber people, so demographically and culturally they were more closely related to nearby Libya, which has a large Berber population, than to Egypt, which has a negligible Berber population. Consequently, Arab rule from distant Cairo was at first tenuous and marked by several revolts. Egypt began to assert firmer control after a 1928 visit to the Oasis by King Fu'ad, who berated the locals

uncovered. Cambyses' Lost Army From September 1983 to February 1984, Gary S. Chafetz, an American journalist and author, led an expedition—sponsored by Harvard University, The National Geographic Society, the Egyptian Geological Survey and Mining Authority


long range

for "a certain vice" and specified punishments to bring Siwan behavior in line with Egyptian morals (see next section). Siwa was the site of some fighting during World War I and World War II. The British Army's Long Range Desert Group (LRDG) was based here, but Rommel's Afrika Korps also took possession three times. German soldiers went skinny dipping in the lake of the oracle, contrary to local customs which prohibit public nudity.

and visited the oasis of Qara (Qara Oasis) and Siwa (Siwa Oasis). Many of these trips used motor vehicles (Ford Model-Ts) which employed special techniques for driving in desert conditions. These techniques were an important asset of the Long Range Desert Group which Bagnold founded in 1940. Bagnold, R.A. 1931. ''Journeys in the Libyan Desert, 1929 and 1930''. The Geographical Journal 78(1): 13-39; (6):524-533. Attempts to conquer south and west

was declared fit for duty and returned to Africa. There he resumed his command of the 3rd recce battalion, garrisoned at a pleasant oasis near Siwa (Siwa Oasis) on the edge of the Qattara Depression, guarding the south flank of the Afrikakorps. Here, the battalion lived a mostly carefree existence, the only threat being the occasional raid by the British Long Range Desert Group. Benghazi and the desert retreat After basic training, Maclean was sent to Cairo, where David


amp version

referred to as "Shelha". http: www.rosettaproject.org live search showpages?ethnocode ZEN&doctype detail&version 0&scale six **Tahaggart Tuareg (Tuareg languages) of Ghat (Ghat, Libya): 17,000 (Johnstone 1993). *'''Egypt''': The oasis of Siwa (Siwa Oasis) near the Libyan border speaks a Berber language; according to the Ethnologue, there are 5,000 speakers there (1995). Its population in 1907 was 3884 (according to the 1911 '' Encyclopædia


previous episode

الإسرائيليين وهذه المناطق في الواحة المصرية" (ie: "the third reason is that some people of Siwa protested about a previous episode because one of the guests spoke of a strong relationship between Israelis and these parts of the Egyptian oases" The File: The Egyptian Oasis of Siwa: Hidden Heritage, Al Jazeera, 5 November 2010 the program's host produced an episode about the history and Berber heritage


quot field

settled since at least the 10th millennium BC, the earliest evidence of connection with ancient Egypt is the 26th Dynasty (Twenty-sixth dynasty of Egypt), when a necropolis was established. During the Ptolemaid period of Egypt its ancient Egyptian (Egyptian language) name was ''sḫ.t-ỉm3w,'' "Field of Trees". Wörterbuch der ägyptischen Sprache, ed. Adolf Erman, Hermann Grapow. Vol. IV, p.230; Vol. VI, p.141 Greek (Ancient Greece) settlers


huge silver

and beads that women wore in abundance to weddings and other ceremonies. Margaret Mary Vale, 2011, Sand and Silver, 71, 79–83. The best known of these pieces are a huge silver disc called ‘adrim’ and a torc, called ‘aghraw’ from which it hung over the breast. A girl would give up the disc at a special ceremony at the Spring the day she was married. The jewellery, which was made by local silversmiths, comprised silver necklaces, earrings, bangles, hair ornaments, pendants

Siwa Oasis

The '''Siwa Oasis''' (Siwi (Siwi language): Isiwan; ) is an oasis in Egypt, between the Qattara Depression and the Egyptian Sand Sea in the Libyan Desert, nearly 50 km (30 mi) east of the Libyan border, and 560 km (348 mi) from Cairo. first last author-link first2 last2 author2-link editor-last editor-first editor2-last editor2-first contribution Siwa contribution-url title Encyclopædia Britannica year 2007 pages place publisher url doi id first last author-link first2 last2 author2-link editor-last Bard editor-first Kathryn A. editor2-last Shubert editor2-first Steven Blake contribution contribution-url title Encyclopedia of the Archaeology of Ancient Egypt year 1999 pages place publisher Routledge (UK) url http: books.google.com ?id XNdgScxtirYC&pg PA738&lpg PA738&dq %22Siwa+Oasis%22 doi id ISBN 0-415-18589-0 isbn 978-0-415-18589-9 first last author-link first2 last2 author2-link editor-last Arnold editor-first Dieter editor2-last Strudwick editor2-first Helen editor3-last Strudwick editor3-first Nigel contribution contribution-url title The Encyclopaedia of Ancient Egyptian Architecture year 2003 pages place publisher I B Tauris url http: books.google.com ?id XIns9M_9DcgC&pg RA1-PA223&lpg RA1-PA223&dq %22Siwa+Oasis%22 doi id ISBN 1-86064-465-1 isbn 978-1-86064-465-8

About 80 km (50 mi) in length and 20 km (12 mi) wide, Siwa Oasis is one of Egypt's most isolated settlements, with 23,000 people, mostly Berber speakers (Berber people) who speak a distinct language of the Berber family (Berber languages) known as Siwi (Siwi language). Its fame lies primarily in its ancient role as the home to an oracle of Amon (Amun), the ruins of which are a popular tourist attraction which gave the oasis its ancient name '''Ammonium'''. Historically, it is part of Ancient Libya. Its modern name ''Siwa'', first attested in the 15th century (earlier Arab geographers termed it ''Santariyyah''), is of uncertain origin. Basset last Basset first René author-link last2 first2 author2-link year 1890 date publication-date contribution contribution-url editor-last editor-first title Le dialecte de Syouah edition series volume place Paris publication-place publisher Ernest Leroux page 3 id isbn doi oclc url links it to a Berber tribal name ''swh'' attested further west in the early Islamic period, while Ilahiane, last Ilahiane first Hsain author-link last2 first2 author2-link year 2006 date publication-date 2006 contribution Siwa Oasis contribution-url editor-last editor-first title Historical dictionary of the Berbers (Imazighen) edition series Historical dictionaries of peoples and cultures volume 5 place Lanham, MD publication-place publisher Scarecrow Press, Inc page 111 id isbn 978-0-8108-5452-9 doi oclc url following Chafik, links it to the Tashelhiyt Berber word ''asiwan'', a type of bird of prey, and hence to Amon-Ra, one of whose symbols was the falcon.

Agriculture is the main activity of modern Siwi, particularly the cultivation of date (date palm)s and olives. Handicrafts like basketry are also of regional importance. The isolation of the oasis caused the development of a unique culture which was shown in its pottery, costume, styles of embroidery and, most notably, in the silver jewellery worn by women to weddings and important occasions. These pieces were decorated with symbols which related to Siwa’s history and beliefs and attitudes. Margaret Mary Vale, 2011, Sand and Silver: Jewellery, Costume and Life in Siwa Oasis, London:Kelim Tourism has in recent decades become a vital source of income. Much attention has been given to creating hotels that use local materials and play on local styles. Can a Desert Oasis Lead the Way to Sustainable Eco-Tourism in Egypt?

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