Shelburne, Nova Scotia

What is Shelburne, Nova Scotia known for?


black history

States had to decide where their future lay. Those loyal to the British Crown were called United Empire Loyalists, and came north. White American Loyalists brought their African American slaves with them, while formerly enslaved Black Americans, about 10% of the total, Black History in Guelph and Wellington County also made their way to the colonies of British


year book

.statcan.gc.ca eng acyb_c1932-eng.aspx?opt eng 1932 193201410103_p.%20103.pdf , Censuses 1871–1931 Census 1941–1951 Census 1961 Canada Year Book 1974

: Censuses 1966, 1971 Canada Year Book 1988: Censuses 1981, 1986 Scotia.html, Census 1991–2006 Film production left thumb Present day barrel factory (File:shelburne nova scotia 2009.JPG) In 1992, Dock Street was the location for the filming of ''Mary Silliman's War'', based on a true story


shelburne nova scotia

: Imperial, if Imperial (metric) is desired-- area_footnotes 2011 Statistics Canada Community Profile: Shelburne, Nova Scotia area_total_km2

codes of Canada B0T 1W0 area_code 902 (Area code 902) blank_name Access Routes blank_info '''Shelburne''' is a town located in southwestern Nova Scotia, Canada. It is the seat of the Municipal District of Shelburne (Shelburne, Nova Scotia (municipal district)). History Early


902

codes of Canada B0T 1W0 area_code 902 (Area code 902) blank_name Access Routes blank_info '''Shelburne''' is a town located in southwestern Nova Scotia, Canada. It is the seat of the Municipal District of Shelburne (Shelburne, Nova Scotia (municipal district)). History Early


largest free

at the same time. They founded Birchtown (Birchtown, Nova Scotia) next to Shelburne and it developed as North America's largest free Black settlement. In the fall of 1783, a second wave of settlers arrived in Shelburne. By 1784, the population of this new community is estimated to have been 17,000, making it the fourth-largest city in North America.


major music

. Shelburne (Shelburne, Nova Scotia) is second largest, with Liverpool and Lunenburg next. Lunenburg, a UNESCO World Heritage Site and the host to several major music festivals and arts events, plus the Bluenose II, is generally considered to be the cultural capital of the South Shore, with Bridgewater its industrial centre. However, that is over-generalized, as several key industries, notably shipping and aerospace and software, have a presence in Lunenburg that exceeds that in Bridgewater. After the war, the British arranged transport to Nova Scotia for nearly 3500 Black Loyalists from the former Thirteen Colonies. John and Rose Gosman and their five-month-old daughter Fanny, born free in British lines, were recorded in the British embarkation record known as the ''Book of Negroes''. They had passage in 1783 on one of the last ships to leave New York for Nova Scotia. Measha's 4xgreat-grandparents first lived in Shelburne (Shelburne, Nova Scotia), but later settled in Fredericton. Brueggergosman learned of her African-American roots on ''Who Do You Think You Are'', a British-based program bought by the CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation). According to Y-DNA genetic testing of her brother, it is likely their direct-line paternal African ancestors came from the Bassa (Bassa (Cameroon)) people of Cameroon. In 1989, transmitters were added in Bridgewater (Bridgewater, Nova Scotia), Truro (Truro, Nova Scotia), and Wolfville (Wolfville, Nova Scotia). The transmitter network was expanded further in 1993 to include service to Shelburne (Shelburne, Nova Scotia), Sydney (Sydney, Nova Scotia), New Glasgow (New Glasgow, Nova Scotia), and Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia). free_label Locations free Halifax (Halifax Urban Area) Dartmouth (Dartmouth, Nova Scotia) Springhill (Springhill, Nova Scotia) Kentville (Kentville, Nova Scotia) Bridgewater (Bridgewater, Nova Scotia) Sydney (Sydney, Nova Scotia) Pictou (Pictou, Nova Scotia) Shelburne (Shelburne, Nova Scotia) Port Hawkesbury (Port Hawkesbury, Nova Scotia) Truro (Truro, Nova Scotia) Middleton (Middleton, Nova Scotia) Lawrencetown (Lawrencetown, Annapolis County, Nova Scotia) Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia) website www.nscc.ca Windsor West: Rob Spring Spring was born in 1964 in Shelburne (Shelburne, Nova Scotia), Nova Scotia. He moved to Windsor (Windsor, Ontario) in his youth, graduated from Essex District High School in 1982, and entered the workforce after his graduation. He served two years with the 21st Windsor Service Battalion as a reservist vehicle technician. Spring is an auto worker, and a veteran environmental activist in Windsor (Windsor, Ontario). He has served on the city's Environmental Advisory Committee, has been a member of the Citizens Environmental Alliance since 1985 (''Windsor Star'', 25 September 1998), and chaired the Canadian Auto Workers Local 444 environmental committee (''Windsor Star'', 22 October 1999). In 1998, he was part of a successful protest against the construction of a rock-crushing facility near a residential area (''Windsor Star'', 20 October 1998). He was also a member of Friends of Marshfield Woods in 2000, and unsuccessfully tried to prevent a logging operation in the area (''Windsor Star'', 17 January 2000). Alleged military search near Shelburne While the official story of the incident ends here, further evidence attributed to various military and civilian witnesses might imply a highly secretive military search involving a small flotilla of Royal Canadian Navy and United States Navy ships about of land fell through as the land boom in Nova Scotia petered out by the mid 1760s. McNutt spent time in the later part of the decade living with his brother on McNutt Island (McNutts Island, Nova Scotia) in Rosebay Harbour (near present-day Shelburne (Shelburne, Nova Scotia)) as well as in the Cobequid region where he appeared in the 1771 census. He seems to have supported himself at this time cutting timber. He was ordered to pay several debts and forced to sell his land at Port Roseway. Other land he held in Pictou (Pictou County, Nova Scotia), the Minas Basin, and Beaver Harbour (Beaver Harbour, Nova Scotia) were escheated. He left the colony around 1780, returned around 1786, and left for good in 1794 and finally settled in Rockbridge County, Virginia in 1796. Biography Born in Formby (Lancashire, England), W. Stewart Wallace (ed), ''The Macmillan Dictionary of Canadian Biography'', Toronto-London, Macmillan, revised ed. 1963, p. 116. Carr was educated in Scotland, and went to sea at the age of fourteen. W. Stewart Wallace (ed), ''The Macmillan Dictionary of Canadian Biography'', ''op. cit.'', p. 116. He served as Navigating Officer (Officer (armed forces)) of H.M.S. (Her Majesty's Ship) Submarines during World War One (World War I) (see : Royal Navy Submarine Service) and as Naval Control Officer and Senior Naval Officer in World War Two (World War II). In World War II he was Naval Control Officer for the St. Lawrence, then Staff Officer Operations at Shelburne, Nova Scotia, then Senior Naval Officer at Goose Bay, Labrador. As an Officer on the staff of Commodore Reginald W. Brock he organized the 7th Victory Loan for the twenty-two Royal Canadian Naval Training Divisions. These biographical details are provided by the Editor's preface of William Guy Carr, ''Pawns in the Game'', Omni Christian Book Club 1993 and ''Satan, prince of this World'', Palmdale, CA, Omni Publications, 1997


based program

Scotia Shelburne , but later settled in Fredericton. Brueggergosman learned of her African-American roots on ''Who Do You Think You Are'', a British-based program bought by the CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation). According to Y-DNA genetic testing of her brother, it is likely their direct-line paternal African ancestors came from the Bassa (Bassa (Cameroon)) people of Cameroon. In 1989, transmitters were added in Bridgewater (Bridgewater, Nova Scotia), Truro (Truro, Nova Scotia), and Wolfville (Wolfville, Nova Scotia). The transmitter network was expanded further in 1993 to include service to Shelburne (Shelburne, Nova Scotia), Sydney (Sydney, Nova Scotia), New Glasgow (New Glasgow, Nova Scotia), and Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia). free_label Locations free Halifax (Halifax Urban Area) Dartmouth (Dartmouth, Nova Scotia) Springhill (Springhill, Nova Scotia) Kentville (Kentville, Nova Scotia) Bridgewater (Bridgewater, Nova Scotia) Sydney (Sydney, Nova Scotia) Pictou (Pictou, Nova Scotia) Shelburne (Shelburne, Nova Scotia) Port Hawkesbury (Port Hawkesbury, Nova Scotia) Truro (Truro, Nova Scotia) Middleton (Middleton, Nova Scotia) Lawrencetown (Lawrencetown, Annapolis County, Nova Scotia) Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia) website www.nscc.ca Windsor West: Rob Spring Spring was born in 1964 in Shelburne (Shelburne, Nova Scotia), Nova Scotia. He moved to Windsor (Windsor, Ontario) in his youth, graduated from Essex District High School in 1982, and entered the workforce after his graduation. He served two years with the 21st Windsor Service Battalion as a reservist vehicle technician. Spring is an auto worker, and a veteran environmental activist in Windsor (Windsor, Ontario). He has served on the city's Environmental Advisory Committee, has been a member of the Citizens Environmental Alliance since 1985 (''Windsor Star'', 25 September 1998), and chaired the Canadian Auto Workers Local 444 environmental committee (''Windsor Star'', 22 October 1999). In 1998, he was part of a successful protest against the construction of a rock-crushing facility near a residential area (''Windsor Star'', 20 October 1998). He was also a member of Friends of Marshfield Woods in 2000, and unsuccessfully tried to prevent a logging operation in the area (''Windsor Star'', 17 January 2000). Alleged military search near Shelburne While the official story of the incident ends here, further evidence attributed to various military and civilian witnesses might imply a highly secretive military search involving a small flotilla of Royal Canadian Navy and United States Navy ships about of land fell through as the land boom in Nova Scotia petered out by the mid 1760s. McNutt spent time in the later part of the decade living with his brother on McNutt Island (McNutts Island, Nova Scotia) in Rosebay Harbour (near present-day Shelburne (Shelburne, Nova Scotia)) as well as in the Cobequid region where he appeared in the 1771 census. He seems to have supported himself at this time cutting timber. He was ordered to pay several debts and forced to sell his land at Port Roseway. Other land he held in Pictou (Pictou County, Nova Scotia), the Minas Basin, and Beaver Harbour (Beaver Harbour, Nova Scotia) were escheated. He left the colony around 1780, returned around 1786, and left for good in 1794 and finally settled in Rockbridge County, Virginia in 1796. Biography Born in Formby (Lancashire, England), W. Stewart Wallace (ed), ''The Macmillan Dictionary of Canadian Biography'', Toronto-London, Macmillan, revised ed. 1963, p. 116. Carr was educated in Scotland, and went to sea at the age of fourteen. W. Stewart Wallace (ed), ''The Macmillan Dictionary of Canadian Biography'', ''op. cit.'', p. 116. He served as Navigating Officer (Officer (armed forces)) of H.M.S. (Her Majesty's Ship) Submarines during World War One (World War I) (see : Royal Navy Submarine Service) and as Naval Control Officer and Senior Naval Officer in World War Two (World War II). In World War II he was Naval Control Officer for the St. Lawrence, then Staff Officer Operations at Shelburne, Nova Scotia, then Senior Naval Officer at Goose Bay, Labrador. As an Officer on the staff of Commodore Reginald W. Brock he organized the 7th Victory Loan for the twenty-two Royal Canadian Naval Training Divisions. These biographical details are provided by the Editor's preface of William Guy Carr, ''Pawns in the Game'', Omni Christian Book Club 1993 and ''Satan, prince of this World'', Palmdale, CA, Omni Publications, 1997


largest black

(Roseway Hospital) Heliport Shelburne (Shelburne, Nova Scotia), Nova Scotia - Nova Scotia Between 1776 and 1785, around 3,500 Blacks were transported to Nova Scotia from the United States, part of a larger migration of about 34,000 Loyalist refugees. This massive influx of people increased the population by almost 60%, and led to the establishment of New Brunswick as its own colony in 1784. Most of the free Blacks settled at Birchtown, the largest Black township in North America at the time. The indentured servants and newly freed slaves mostly settled in the town of Shelburne (Shelburne, Nova Scotia). of land fell through as the land boom in Nova Scotia petered out by the mid 1760s. McNutt spent time in the later part of the decade living with his brother on McNutt Island (McNutts Island, Nova Scotia) in Rosebay Harbour (near present-day Shelburne (Shelburne, Nova Scotia)) as well as in the Cobequid region where he appeared in the 1771 census. He seems to have supported himself at this time cutting timber. He was ordered to pay several debts and forced to sell his land at Port Roseway. Other land he held in Pictou (Pictou County, Nova Scotia), the Minas Basin, and Beaver Harbour (Beaver Harbour, Nova Scotia) were escheated. He left the colony around 1780, returned around 1786, and left for good in 1794 and finally settled in Rockbridge County, Virginia in 1796. Biography Born in Formby (Lancashire, England), W. Stewart Wallace (ed), ''The Macmillan Dictionary of Canadian Biography'', Toronto-London, Macmillan, revised ed. 1963, p. 116. Carr was educated in Scotland, and went to sea at the age of fourteen. W. Stewart Wallace (ed), ''The Macmillan Dictionary of Canadian Biography'', ''op. cit.'', p. 116. He served as Navigating Officer (Officer (armed forces)) of H.M.S. (Her Majesty's Ship) Submarines during World War One (World War I) (see : Royal Navy Submarine Service) and as Naval Control Officer and Senior Naval Officer in World War Two (World War II). In World War II he was Naval Control Officer for the St. Lawrence, then Staff Officer Operations at Shelburne, Nova Scotia, then Senior Naval Officer at Goose Bay, Labrador. As an Officer on the staff of Commodore Reginald W. Brock he organized the 7th Victory Loan for the twenty-two Royal Canadian Naval Training Divisions. These biographical details are provided by the Editor's preface of William Guy Carr, ''Pawns in the Game'', Omni Christian Book Club 1993 and ''Satan, prince of this World'', Palmdale, CA, Omni Publications, 1997


large+online

over the 30-year term of the contract. Cooke Aquaculture Ltd. has chosen Shelburne as site for a substantial increase in their salmon farming operation. Plans are to increase the number of farms in the area to eight or more and construct a fish processing plant employing 350 people. In February 2012, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency quarantined one site due to a suspected Infectious Salmon Anemia (ISA) occurrence. The area is served by a weekly newspaper, a large online news operation


sound stage

in the Shelburne area was sold to a group who planned to make more movies at a sound stage located on the station; they sold the complex for other purposes. In 2009, filming for portions of the 2-part TV miniseries, ''Moby Dick (Moby Dick (2011 miniseries)),'' was carried out in Shelburne. A recreation of the Whaleman's Chapel was constructed on the waterfront and the Spouter's Inn constructed as a set in Cox's Warehouse. The series stars William Hurt as Ahab, Gillian Anderson as his wife Elizabeth, Ethan Hawke as Starbuck and Donald Sutherland as Father Mappel. Public library Located at 17 Glasgow Street in Shelburne, the McKay Memorial Library is one of the larger branches of the Western Counties Regional Library. It joined the Western Counties Regional Library on June 5, 1969 but it did not have a physical location in Shelburne until the first branch opened on February 15, 1970. The branch relocated to its present site on July 21, 1989. WCRL – McKay Memorial Library. Retrieved August 13, 2010. See also * List of communities in Nova Scotia References of land fell through as the land boom in Nova Scotia petered out by the mid 1760s. McNutt spent time in the later part of the decade living with his brother on McNutt Island (McNutts Island, Nova Scotia) in Rosebay Harbour (near present-day Shelburne (Shelburne, Nova Scotia)) as well as in the Cobequid region where he appeared in the 1771 census. He seems to have supported himself at this time cutting timber. He was ordered to pay several debts and forced to sell his land at Port Roseway. Other land he held in Pictou (Pictou County, Nova Scotia), the Minas Basin, and Beaver Harbour (Beaver Harbour, Nova Scotia) were escheated. He left the colony around 1780, returned around 1786, and left for good in 1794 and finally settled in Rockbridge County, Virginia in 1796. Biography Born in Formby (Lancashire, England), W. Stewart Wallace (ed), ''The Macmillan Dictionary of Canadian Biography'', Toronto-London, Macmillan, revised ed. 1963, p. 116. Carr was educated in Scotland, and went to sea at the age of fourteen. W. Stewart Wallace (ed), ''The Macmillan Dictionary of Canadian Biography'', ''op. cit.'', p. 116. He served as Navigating Officer (Officer (armed forces)) of H.M.S. (Her Majesty's Ship) Submarines during World War One (World War I) (see : Royal Navy Submarine Service) and as Naval Control Officer and Senior Naval Officer in World War Two (World War II). In World War II he was Naval Control Officer for the St. Lawrence, then Staff Officer Operations at Shelburne, Nova Scotia, then Senior Naval Officer at Goose Bay, Labrador. As an Officer on the staff of Commodore Reginald W. Brock he organized the 7th Victory Loan for the twenty-two Royal Canadian Naval Training Divisions. These biographical details are provided by the Editor's preface of William Guy Carr, ''Pawns in the Game'', Omni Christian Book Club 1993 and ''Satan, prince of this World'', Palmdale, CA, Omni Publications, 1997

Shelburne, Nova Scotia

'''Shelburne''' is a town located in southwestern Nova Scotia, Canada. It is the seat of the Municipal District of Shelburne (Shelburne, Nova Scotia (municipal district)).

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