Shawinigan

What is Shawinigan known for?


famous people

-Marie , a private institution that provides the secondary curriculum and of the Collège Shawinigan: a CEGEP whose main campus is located at 2263 Avenue du Collège; Transportation Many of the oldest streets of Shawinigan were numbered, like the streets of Manhattan, New York. Similarly, Avenue Broadway (Broadway (Manhattan)) was named after the famous Manhattan thoroughfare. Several other streets and avenues were named to honor famous people, including:

l'Énergie * the Shawinigan Cataractes: the only QMJHL franchise to have stayed in the same city since the league's inception in 1969. They play at the Centre Bionest * the Shawinigan-Sud Tax Centre (Income taxes in Canada) Famous people The city is home to: * Peter Blaikie, a prominent lawyer * Phil Casabon, freestyle skier * Aline Chrétien, wife of former Prime Minister Jean Chrétien * Jean Chrétien, Prime Minister of Canada from 1993 to 2003, and former


822

in business - Chez Paul (Bistro Bar) 303, avenue Tamarac Saint-Bernard out of business - Chez Paul (Taverne) Au Gobelet 403, avenue Tamarac Saint-Pierre burned down - Chez Rosaire 763, rue Lambert Saint-Marc still in business - Corvette 822, rue Trudel Saint-Marc burned down in 1973 - Taverne Laliberté Taverne des Expos, Bar de l’Énergie 1572, avenue Saint-Marc Saint-Marc still in business - Taverne Moderne 2282, avenue Saint-Marc

822, rue Trudel Saint-Marc burned down in 1973 - Château Turcotte 1000, avenue Melville Saint-Pierre 1858 burned down in 1878 - De Lasalle Hôtel Central, Grand Central 590, 3e rue Saint-Paul, Grand-Mère damaged by fire in 2012, out of business Incendie à l'ancien Hôtel de Lasalle, Marie-Ève Lafontaine, Le


444

POPC&Code1 0750&Geo2 PR&Code2 24&Data Count&SearchText Shawinigan&SearchType Begins&SearchPR 01&B1 All&GeoLevel PR&GeoCode 0750&TABID 1 Shawinigan (Population centre), Quebec 2011 Census profile area_urban_km2 109.93 area_metro_footnotes 444&Geo2 PR&Code2 24&Data

Count&SearchText Shawinigan&SearchType Begins&SearchPR 01&B1 All&GeoLevel PR&GeoCode 444&TABID 1 Shawinigan (Census agglomeration), Quebec 2011 Census profile . The census agglomeration consists of Shawinigan, Saint-Boniface (Saint-Boniface, Quebec), Saint-Roch-de-Mékinac (Saint-Roch-de-Mékinac, Quebec). In the 2006 census, the census agglomeration had included Grandes-Piles (Grandes-Piles, Quebec), but had not included Saint-Roch-de-Mékinac. ref>


speaking community

bâti de la ville de Shawinigan, Corporation culturelle de Shawinigan, July 2010 Many of the opulent uphill homes located in the somewhat secluded areas of Maple Street and Hemlock Avenue were occupied by more affluent people, many of whom happened to belong to the once vibrant English-speaking community, which at times comprised more than 30% of the local population. As industrial plants began operation eastward and northward, neighborhoods were established in Uptown Shawinigan. The emergence of these new districts was defined by and intertwined with the parish structure of the Roman Catholic Church. The Saint-Marc neighborhood, originally known as Village St-Onge, was annexed in 1902, extending the city limits to Dufresne Street. The uptown presence of the Canadian Carborundum and Alcan no. 2 plants favored the foundation the Christ-Roi neighborhood, which was annexed in 1925 extending the city limits to St-Sacrement Boulevard. The land now occupied by the section of town currently known as Shawinigan-Est was annexed in 1932. Uptown Shawinigan had its own fire station by 1922 and its own landscaped public park and swimming pool by 1940. Fabien LaRochelle, Shawinigan depuis 75 ans, Shawinigan, 1976 Westside near the Shawinigan River, the existence of the pulp and paper Belgo plant attracted enough residents to form a small, yet stable independent urban community called Baie-de-Shawinigan. Across the St-Maurice River, Shawinigan-Sud (then Almaville) maintained home-rule and developed as a residential hub. Great Depression Local prosperity (Prosperous) was interrupted by the Great Depression in the 1930s. Many plants were forced to temporarily reduce or stop their production, which left many residents jobless. Many families needed public assistance to survive. The City Council enacted a public works program to help families. The promenade along the St Maurice was a make work project during the depression. World War II World War II put Shawinigan Falls, and many others cities in Canada, back on the path of economic recovery (jobless recovery). During hostilities, the windows of local power plants were painted black to prevent any possible German (Germany) aerial (Air force) attack. The Shawinigan-based 81st Artillery Battery (62nd (Shawinigan) Field Artillery Regiment) was called to active duty during World War II. Its members were trained in Ontario and the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1944 and contributed to the Allies (Allies of World War II)' effort in the Normandy Landings in 1944-45, which led to the Liberation of France. J.J. Bellemare, 60 ans d'artillerie en Mauricie, Shawinigan, 1996 In 1948, a cenotaph, known as Monument des Braves (Monument des Braves, Shawinigan), was erected in downtown Shawinigan at the intersection of Fourth Street and Promenade du Saint-Maurice (then Riverside Street) near the Saint-Maurice River, in honour of soldiers who died during that conflict as well as World War I. Rise of the working class By the early 1950s, the industrial growth in Shawinigan was such that the city offered the steadiest employment and the highest wages in Quebec.


liberal member

and paper plant went on strike in 1955. In the 1952 provincial election (Quebec general election, 1952), Shawinigan (Saint-Maurice (provincial electoral district)) sent a Liberal (Liberal Party of Quebec) member to the legislature (National Assembly of Quebec). The gesture was largely considered an affront to Premier (Premier of Quebec) Maurice Duplessis, who responded by refusing to approve the construction of a new bridge between Shawinigan and Shawinigan-Sud. The new bridge was not built until after the Liberal Party won the 1960 election (Quebec general election, 1960). It was completed on September 2, 1962.


related articles

, February 23, 2007 Sister cities *


works program

-Sud (then Almaville) maintained home-rule and developed as a residential hub. Great Depression Local prosperity (Prosperous) was interrupted by the Great Depression in the 1930s. Many plants were forced to temporarily reduce or stop their production, which left many residents jobless. Many families needed public assistance to survive. The City Council enacted a public works program to help families. The promenade along the St Maurice was a make work project during


theme

of that initiative is the establishment of La Cité de l'Énergie, a theme park based on local industrial history, with a 115 metre high observation tower (observation tower of la Cité de l'Énergie). Since it opened in 1997, it has attracted thousands of visitors to the area. It currently hosts bus tours and cruises, as well as entertainment shows and interactive exhibits. Since 2012, it is also home to the Museum of Prime Minister Jean Chrétien, a venue similar to those operated

. location Shawinigan, Quebec, Canada type theme park '''La Cite de l'Énergie''' is a theme park based on local industrial history and located in Shawinigan, Quebec, Canada. * City of '''Shawinigan''': former city of Shawinigan; cities of Grand-Mère (Grand-Mère, Quebec) and Shawinigan-Sud (Shawinigan-Sud, Quebec); municipality of Lac-à-la-Tortue (Lac-à-la-Tortue, Quebec); village of Saint-Georges-de-Champlain, Quebec Saint-Georges-de


local association

Saint-Marc still in business - Taverne des Sports Club Social 382, 5e rue Saint-Pierre demolished In 1951, the local tavern keepers formed a business association. In 1981


long including

at Stanstead (Stanstead, Quebec (city)) to Shawinigan where it downgrades to Route 155. The total length of A-55 is currently

Shawinigan

'''Shawinigan''' is a city located on the Saint-Maurice River in the Mauricie area in Quebec, Canada. It had a population of 50,060 as of the Canada 2011 Census.

Shawinigan is also a territory equivalent to a regional county municipality (TE) and census division (Census geographic units of Canada) (CD) of Quebec, coextensive with the city of Shawinigan. Its geographical code is 36. Shawinigan is the seat of the judicial district (Judicial districts of Quebec) of Saint-Maurice. ''Territorial Division Act''. ''Revised Statutes of Quebec'' D-11.

The name Shawinigan has had numerous spellings over time: Chaouinigane, Oshaouinigane, Assaouinigane, Achawénégan, Chawinigame, Shawenigane, Chaouénigane. It may mean "south portage", "portage of beeches", "angular portage", or "summit" or "crest". Before 1958 the city was known as Shawinigan Falls.

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