San Cristóbal de las Casas

What is San Cristóbal de las Casas known for?


carrying heavy

name "encmuc" However, the most elaborate rituals are performed during Holy Week. Holy Week processions include both silent and chanting marchers. A number are dressed in pointed hoods and carrying heavy platform with religious figures. They go from home to home, stopping at those homes that have erected small shrines. There they say prayers and bless the house and its occupants before moving on. They finally come to rest in a gigantic open house where an inner shrine has been erected lit by thousands of candles and a large potluck supper. All, even passersby, are welcome to partake. Passion plays depicting the crucifixion of Jesus are common events with one large one centered in the open plaza behind the municipal palace. After dark, there is the Burning of Judas. These Judas figures are plentiful and include government bureaucrats, Church official, the army, the United States, Spanish conquistadors, celebrities as well as Judas. The figures are lit by local firemen who try to keep people back at a safe distance, but fireworks fall among the crowds anyway. The Feria de la Primavera y la Paz (Spring and Peace Fair) run concurrent with Holy Week, especially on Holy Saturday with music and costumes. It terminates with the burning of Judas. A queen is elected to be crowned the next day. Bullfights are held. The Festival Cervantino Barroco is held each year in the historic center featuring invited artists from various parts of Mexico and abroad. It is held in various forums in the city includes concerts, plays, exhibitions and conferences. The main town square is a marked copy of La Florida (park) of Álava, Spain, due to local euphoria with the last name "Ortés De Velasco". The center of the city is its main plaza. This plaza’s official name is Plaza 31 de marzo, but it is more often simply called the Zocalo. In the colonial era, the city’s main market was here as well as the main water supply. Today, it is centered on a kiosk which was added in the early 20th century. The corners of this structure have inscriptions marking the major events of San Cristóbal’s history. The rest of the plaza is filled with gardens and surrounded by the most important buildings and finest homes from the history of the city. Surrounding this plaza are the city’s most important buildings such as the Cathedral and the city hall. The Cathedral is to the north of the main plaza and it is the most emblematic symbol of the city. However, the main facade does not face the Zocalo, rather it faces its own atrium (atrium (architecture)) which is called the Cathedral Plaza. The Cathedral began as a modest church dedicated to the Virgin of the Assumption (Assumption of Mary) built in 1528. When Chiapas became a diocese (Roman Catholic Diocese of San Cristóbal de Las Casas) in the 17th century, with San Cristóbal as its seat, this church was torn down to build the current structure, dedicated to Saint Christopher, the patron of the city. The overall structure contains European Baroque, Moorish and indigenous influences. The main facade was finished in 1721 and some final touches were added in the 20th century. and a Quranic school (madrasa) where children learned Arabic and prayed five times a day in the backroom of a residential building. Nowadays, most of the Mayan Muslims have left the Murabitun and established ties with the CCIM, now following the orthodox Sunni school of Islam. They built the Al-Kausar Mosque in San Cristobal de las Casas.


life working

a new life. Working on behalf of the Mexican government, Trudi Duby was photographing the legendary Lacandon Maya, the only Maya never conquered or converted by the Spanish. From then on, La Selva Lacandona rain forest was the common denominator in the professional and personal lives of Frans and Trudi Blom. The first evangelists came to the area in 1545, sent by Bartolomé de las Casas from San Cristóbal de las Casas. These monks were Dominicans (Dominican order), who divided


heavy strip

is destined to other municipalities in the region, although some goes to other cities in Chiapas, and states such as Tabasco and Campeche. This heavy strip mining has gradually eaten away at the natural landscape of some areas of the city and has negatively affected the recharge of surface and subsurface water. The most important economic sector is commerce, services and tourism, which employs almost 67% of the workforce compared to 29


cultural de

covers the history of the city until the 19th century. Of this collection, the two most important pieces are some petals of a pomegranate flower, from a receptacle for the Host in the Cathedral. It is one of most important works Chiapas silver smithing. The rest of the piece has been lost. The other is a part of the original choir seating of the same Cathedral. The Centro Cultural de los Altos has a collection of some of the area’s textiles from each


large building

. The Carmen Temple is all that remains of the former La Encarnación convent which was founded at in 1597 with the first nuns arriving between 1609 and 1610. The complex includes the old cloister, nuns’ cells and other structures. The original church building burned and it was restored conserving its simple facade. One unusual feature of the church is that its layout is “L” shaped, covering the south and west sides of a small plaza. Inside, the walls have carved wood panels and a Neoclassical altar which has been recently restored. In the colonial period, the convent and church served as one


made detailed

documentation done by scholars over the years, and addresses environmental threats to the Lacandon Jungle, such as deforestation. Among its many projects, Casa Na Bolom has collaborated with a group of Swedish ethnomusicology students who recorded traditional Lacandón songs. A publication of those recordings in CD form is now planned. Maler developed interests in photography and in the antiquities of Mesoamerica. In 1876 he made detailed photos of the structures at Mitla. In the summer of the following year he moved to San Cristóbal de las Casas, and in July set out to visit the ruins of Palenque. While several accounts of the site had been published by this time, it was still little visited, and Maler needed to employ a team of the local ''Indios'' to open a path to the ruin with machetes. He spent a week at Palenque, sketching, measuring, and photographing the site, and became aware that earlier published accounts were inadequate, and that most earlier visitors had limited their descriptions to only a portion of the buildings observed there. While Maler was there another visitor came to the ruins, Gustave Bernoulli, a Swiss (Switzerland) botanist who shared his interest in Maya sites, and had recently made a visit to Tikal. Bernoulli confirmed Maler's suspicion that there was much work that needed to be done to document the area's ruins. - 083 San Cristóbal de las Casas San Cristóbal de las Casas - * Puebla, Puebla * San Cristóbal de las Casas, Chiapas * San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato '''Tzeltal''' is a Mayan language (Mayan languages) spoken in the Mexican state of Chiapas, mostly in the municipalities of Ocosingo, Altamirano (Altamirano Municipality), Huixtán, Tenejapa, Yajalón, Chanal, Sitalá, Amatenango del Valle, Socoltenango, Villa las Rosas, Chilón, San Juan Cancun, San Cristóbal de las Casas and Oxchuc. It is a living language with some 371,730 speakers as of 2005, including a number of monolinguals. Ethnologue: tzh In the late nineties a consortium of scientists, and government and non-governmental organizations met in San Cristóbal de las Casas, under the auspices of the Wildlife Conservation Society and the University of Florida, to identify the extent and types of habitat remaining the region, and to draw maps of the watershed. The conference addressed many of the jurisdictional and administrative questions that still bedevil the idea. and a Quranic school (madrasa) where children learned Arabic and prayed five times a day in the backroom of a residential building. Nowadays, most of the Mayan Muslims have left the Murabitun and established ties with the CCIM, now following the orthodox Sunni school of Islam. They built the Al-Kausar Mosque in San Cristobal de las Casas.


salsa

options, such as vegetarian available. An older foreign influence is the city’s noted cured meat tradition, which can be traced back to both the Spanish and the Germans. These are featured in a number of dishes including chalupas. Foreign influence can also be seen in the city’s nightlife which offers reggae, salsa (salsa music), techno (techno music) and more. ref name

, President Felipe Calderón recognized the city as “the most magical of the Pueblos Mágicos (Magical Villages)” of Mexico. The tourism itself has affected the city’s culture with many foreign visitors staying and many businesses, foreign owned or not, catering to international tastes. Italian, French, Thai and other cuisines can be found and the nightlife of the city offers musical styles such as reggae, salsa, techno and more. ref name "mexsur" >


natural landscape

is destined to other municipalities in the region, although some goes to other cities in Chiapas, and states such as Tabasco and Campeche. This heavy strip mining has gradually eaten away at the natural landscape of some areas of the city and has negatively affected the recharge of surface and subsurface water. The most important economic sector is commerce, services and tourism, which employs almost 67% of the workforce compared to 29


main feature

and a Quranic school (madrasa) where children learned Arabic and prayed five times a day in the backroom of a residential building. Nowadays, most of the Mayan Muslims have left the Murabitun and established ties with the CCIM, now following the orthodox Sunni school of Islam. They built the Al-Kausar Mosque in San Cristobal de las Casas.


nearby military

Liberation (Ejército Zapatista de Liberación Nacional, EZLN) , came to the world’s attention when on January 1, 1994, the day the NAFTA treaty went into effect. On this day, EZLN forces occupied and took over the towns of San Cristobal de las Casas, along with six other Chiapas communities. They read their proclamation of revolt to the world and then laid siege to a nearby military base, capturing weapons and releasing many prisoners from the jails. ref name "hisschmal">

San Cristóbal de las Casas

'''San Cristóbal de las Casas''' ( ), is a town and municipality (municipalities of Mexico) located in the Central Highlands region of the Mexican (Mexico) state of Chiapas. It was the capital of the state until 1892, and is still considered the cultural capital of Chiapas.

The municipality is mostly made up of mountainous terrain, but the city sits in a small valley surrounded by hills. The city’s center maintains its Spanish colonial layout and much of its architecture, with red tile roofs, cobblestone streets and wrought iron balconies often with flowers. Most of the city’s economy is based on commerce, services and tourism. Tourism is based on the city’s history, culture and indigenous population, although the tourism itself has affected the city, giving it foreign elements. Major landmarks of the city include the Cathedral, the Santo Domingo church with its large open air crafts market and the Casa Na Bolom museum. The municipality has suffered severe deforestation, but it has natural attractions such as caves and rivers.

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Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017