Sais, Egypt

What is Sais, Egypt known for?


story

, the Egyptian cities including Sais survived. Diodorus Siculus, ''Historical Library'' "Book V, 57". In Plato's ''Timaeus (Timaeus (dialogue))'' and ''Critias'' (around 395 B.C., 200 years after the visit by the Greek legislator Solon), Sais is the city in which Solon (Solon visited Egypt in 590 B.C.) receives the story of Atlantis, its military aggression against Greece

Scholars dispute whether and how much Plato's story or account was inspired by older traditions. In ''Critias (Critias (dialogue))'', Plato claims that his accounts of ancient Athens and Atlantis stem from a visit to Egypt (Ancient Egypt) by the legendary Athenian lawgiver Solon in the 6th century BC. In Egypt, Solon met a priest of Sais (Sais, Egypt), who translated the history of ancient Athens and Atlantis, recorded on papyri in Egyptian hieroglyphs, into Greek language

- Southern Tomb 25 - Speos Artemidos - Sphinx - ''Stargate'' - Stele - Stella (beer) (Heineken brands) - Step pyramid - ''Story of Sinuhe'' - ''Story of Wenamun'' - Strabo - Suez - Suez Canal - Suez Crisis - Syenite - Syriac language After the withdrawal of Egypt from Nubia at the end of the New Kingdom, a native dynasty took control of Nubia. Under king Piye, the Nubian founder of Twenty-fifth dynasty of Egypt Twenty-Fifth Dynasty


732

Inc., 1985. ISBN 0-87779-508-8, ISBN 0-87779-509-6 (indexed), and ISBN 0-87779-510-X (deluxe). It was the provincial capital of Sap-Meh, the fifth nome (nome (Egypt)) of Lower Egypt and became the seat of power during the Twenty-fourth dynasty of Egypt (c. 732–720 BC) and the Saite Twenty-sixth dynasty of Egypt (664–525 BC) during the Late Period (Late Period of Ancient Egypt). Ian Shaw & Paul Nicholson, The Dictionary

of Sais * Official site at the University of Durham

-fourth dynasty of Egypt Twenty-fourth Dynasty was a short-lived rival dynasty located in the western Delta (Sais (Sais, Egypt)), with only two Pharaoh ruling from 732 (732 BC) to 720 BC. Instead, Egypt was ruled (from 664 BC, a full eight years prior to Tanutamun's death) by the Twenty-Sixth Dynasty, client kings established by the Assyrians who successfully brought about Egypt's political independence under their reign. Psamtik I was the first to be recognised by them


Circumcision

, and Zipporah's experience with circumcision, referenced in Exodus 4:25, may indicate medical studies. * Archeological description


664

Inc., 1985. ISBN 0-87779-508-8, ISBN 0-87779-509-6 (indexed), and ISBN 0-87779-510-X (deluxe). It was the provincial capital of Sap-Meh, the fifth nome (nome (Egypt)) of Lower Egypt and became the seat of power during the Twenty-fourth dynasty of Egypt (c. 732–720 BC) and the Saite Twenty-sixth dynasty of Egypt (664–525 BC) during the Late Period (Late Period of Ancient Egypt). Ian Shaw & Paul Nicholson, The Dictionary

of Sais * Official site at the University of Durham

of Egypt is ascribed by Herodotus to the Dodecarchy, or rule of 12, which must represent this combination of rulers. Psamtik was the son of Necho I who died in 664 BC when the Kushite king Tantamani tried unsuccessfully to seize control of lower Egypt from the Assyrian Empire. After his father's death, Psamtik managed to both unite all of Egypt and free her from Assyrian control within the first ten years of his reign. '''Volume 3''' continues with Twentieth dynasty of Egypt Dynasty XX


title ancient

The '''Twenty-sixth Dynasty''' of Egypt (also written '''Dynasty XXVI''' or '''Dynasty 26''') was the last native dynasty to rule Egypt (Ancient Egypt) before the Persian conquest (History of Persian Egypt) in 525 (525 BC) BC (Before Christ) (although others followed). The Dynasty's reign (''c''. 685 (685 BC)-525 (525 BC) BC ) is also called the '''Saite Period''' after the city of Sais (Sais, Egypt), where its pharaohs had their capital, and marks the beginning of the Late Period of ancient Egypt. Aidan Dodson, Dyan Hilton: The Complete Royal Families of Ancient Egypt. The American University in Cairo Press, London 2004 Rulers The Twenty-Eighth Dynasty of Egypt had one ruler, Amyrtaeus, who was a descendant of the Saite (Sais, Egypt) kings of the Twenty-Sixth Dynasty (Twenty-sixth dynasty of Egypt), and led a successful revolt against the Persians (Achaemenid Empire) on the death of Darius II. No monuments of his reign have been found, and little is known of his reign. '''Necho I''' (sometimes '''Nekau''') (672 BC–664 BC) was the prince (Prince of Saïs) or governor of the Egyptian city of Sais (Sais, Egypt). He was the first attested local Saite king of the twenty-sixth dynasty of Egypt who reigned for 8 years, according to Manetho's Epitome. Egypt was reunified by his son, Psamtik I. Necho I is primarily known from Assyrian documents but is now also attested in one contemporary Egyptian document from his reign. He was officially "installed" at Sais by Assurbanipal around 670 BC, but he already ruled Egypt as a local king prior to this event. According to historical records, Necho I was killed by an invading Kushite force in 664 BC under Tantamani for being an ally of Assyria. The Nubian invasion into the Egyptian Delta was subsequently repelled by the Assyrians who proceeded to advance south into Upper Egypt and sack Thebes. Twenty-Fourth Dynasty The Twenty-fourth Dynasty (Twenty-fourth dynasty of Egypt) was a short-lived rival dynasty located in the western Delta (Sais (Sais, Egypt)), with only two Pharaoh ruling from 732 (732 BC) to 720 BC. Instead, Egypt was ruled (from 664 BC, a full eight years prior to Tanutamun's death) by the Twenty-Sixth Dynasty, client kings established by the Assyrians who successfully brought about Egypt's political independence under their reign. Psamtik I was the first to be recognised by them as the King of the whole of Egypt, and he brought increased stability to the country in a 54 year reign from the city of Sais (Sais, Egypt). Four successive Saite kings continued guiding Egypt into another period of peace and prosperity from 610-525 BC. Unfortunately for his dynasty, a new power was growing in the Near East – Persia. Pharaoh Psamtik III had succeeded his father Ahmose II for only 6 months before he had to face the Persian Empire at Pelusium. The Persians had already taken Babylon and Egypt was no match. Psamtik III was defeated and briefly escaped to Memphis, before he was ultimately imprisoned and, later, executed at Susa, the capital of the Persian king Cambyses, who now assumed the formal title of Pharaoh. 28th-30th Dynasties The Twenty-Eighth Dynasty (Twenty-eighth dynasty of Egypt) consisted of a single king, Amyrtaeus, prince of Sais (Sais, Egypt), who rebelled against the Persians. He left no monuments with his name. This dynasty lasted 6 years, from 404 BC to 398 BC. Biography Tefnakht erected two donation stelas in Years 36 and 38 of Shoshenq V as a Prince at Saïs. His Year 38 stela from Buto is significant not only because Tefnakht employs the rather boastful epithet of "Great Chief of the entire land" but due to its list of his religious titles as '''prophet of Neith, Edjo and the Lady of Imay'''. Kitchen, The Third Intermediate Period in Egypt, p.362 This reflects his control over Sais, Buto to the north and Kom el-Hish to the southwest even prior to the end of the 22nd Dynasty—with the death of Shoshenq V—and reflects Tefnakht's political base in the Western Delta region of Egypt. The 22nd Dynasty was politically fragmenting even prior to the death of Shoshenq V. Tefnakht established his capital at Sais (Sais, Egypt), and formed an alliance with other minor kings of the Delta (Nile Delta) region in order to conquer Middle and Upper Egypt, which was under the sway of the Nubian king Piye. He was able to capture and unify many of the cities of the Delta region, thus making Tefnakht considerably more powerful than any of his predecessors in either the 22nd (Twenty-second dynasty of Egypt) or 23rd dynasties. '''Bakenranef''', known by the ancient Greeks as '''Bocchoris''', Bakenranef's name is consistently ''Bocchoris'' in the Greek accounts and in Tacitus; the decipherment of Egyptian hieroglyphics (Champollion) has permitted the reconstruction of his authentic Egyptian name. was briefly a king of the Twenty-fourth dynasty of Egypt. Based at Sais (Sais, Egypt) in the western Delta, he ruled Lower Egypt from c. 725 to 720 BC. Though the Ptolemaic period Egyptian historian Manetho Manetho, frags. 64, 65. considers him the sole member of the Twenty-fourth dynasty, modern scholars include his father Tefnakht in that dynasty. Although Sextus Julius Africanus quotes Manetho as stating that "Bocchoris" ruled for six years, some modern scholars again differ and assign him a shorter reign of only five years, based on evidence from an Apis Bull burial stela. It establishes that Bakenranef's reign ended only at the start of his 6th regnal year which, under the Egyptian dating system, means he had a reign of 5 full years. Bakenranef's prenomen or royal name, ''Wahkare'', means "Constant is the Spirit of Re" in Egyptian. Peter A. Clayton, ''Chronicle of the Pharaohs: The Reign-by-Reign Record of the Rulers and Dynasties of Ancient Egypt'', Thames and Hudson, London, 1994. p.188 Osorkon probably lived into his eighties, which explains why he appointed his son Takelot as the junior coregent to the throne in his final years. He would have been in failing health by this time. Osorkon III's coregency with Takelot III is the last attested royal coregency in ancient Egyptian history. Later dynasties from Nubia, Sais (Sais, Egypt), and Persia (Achaemenid Empire) all ruled Egypt with a single king on the throne.


years based

Sextus Julius Africanus quotes Manetho as stating that "Bocchoris" ruled for six years, some modern scholars again differ and assign him a shorter reign of only five years, based on evidence from an Apis Bull burial stela. It establishes that Bakenranef's reign ended only at the start of his 6th regnal year which, under the Egyptian dating system, means he had a reign of 5 full years. Bakenranef's prenomen or royal name, ''Wahkare'', means "Constant is the Spirit of Re"


medical school

Isis.html Isis and Osiris ''", ch. 9. There are today no surviving traces of this town prior to the Late New Kingdom (c.1100 BC) due to the extensive destruction of the city by the ''Sebakhin (Sebakh)'' (farmers removing mud brick deposits for use as fertilizer) leaving only a few relief blocks ''in situ''. Medical school The Temple of Sais had a medical school associated with it, as did many ancient Egyptian temples (Egyptian temple). The medical school at Sais had many female students and apparently women faculty as well, mainly in gynecology and obstetrics. An inscription from the period survives at Sais, and reads, "I have come from the school of medicine at Heliopolis, and have studied at the woman's school at Sais, where the divine mothers have taught me how to cure diseases". Moses and his wife, Zipporah, were said The '''Twenty-sixth Dynasty''' of Egypt (also written '''Dynasty XXVI''' or '''Dynasty 26''') was the last native dynasty to rule Egypt (Ancient Egypt) before the Persian conquest (History of Persian Egypt) in 525 (525 BC) BC (Before Christ) (although others followed). The Dynasty's reign (''c''. 685 (685 BC)-525 (525 BC) BC ) is also called the '''Saite Period''' after the city of Sais (Sais, Egypt), where its pharaohs had their capital, and marks the beginning of the Late Period of ancient Egypt. Aidan Dodson, Dyan Hilton: The Complete Royal Families of Ancient Egypt. The American University in Cairo Press, London 2004 Rulers The Twenty-Eighth Dynasty of Egypt had one ruler, Amyrtaeus, who was a descendant of the Saite (Sais, Egypt) kings of the Twenty-Sixth Dynasty (Twenty-sixth dynasty of Egypt), and led a successful revolt against the Persians (Achaemenid Empire) on the death of Darius II. No monuments of his reign have been found, and little is known of his reign. '''Necho I''' (sometimes '''Nekau''') (672 BC–664 BC) was the prince (Prince of Saïs) or governor of the Egyptian city of Sais (Sais, Egypt). He was the first attested local Saite king of the twenty-sixth dynasty of Egypt who reigned for 8 years, according to Manetho's Epitome. Egypt was reunified by his son, Psamtik I. Necho I is primarily known from Assyrian documents but is now also attested in one contemporary Egyptian document from his reign. He was officially "installed" at Sais by Assurbanipal around 670 BC, but he already ruled Egypt as a local king prior to this event. According to historical records, Necho I was killed by an invading Kushite force in 664 BC under Tantamani for being an ally of Assyria. The Nubian invasion into the Egyptian Delta was subsequently repelled by the Assyrians who proceeded to advance south into Upper Egypt and sack Thebes. Twenty-Fourth Dynasty The Twenty-fourth Dynasty (Twenty-fourth dynasty of Egypt) was a short-lived rival dynasty located in the western Delta (Sais (Sais, Egypt)), with only two Pharaoh ruling from 732 (732 BC) to 720 BC. Instead, Egypt was ruled (from 664 BC, a full eight years prior to Tanutamun's death) by the Twenty-Sixth Dynasty, client kings established by the Assyrians who successfully brought about Egypt's political independence under their reign. Psamtik I was the first to be recognised by them as the King of the whole of Egypt, and he brought increased stability to the country in a 54 year reign from the city of Sais (Sais, Egypt). Four successive Saite kings continued guiding Egypt into another period of peace and prosperity from 610-525 BC. Unfortunately for his dynasty, a new power was growing in the Near East – Persia. Pharaoh Psamtik III had succeeded his father Ahmose II for only 6 months before he had to face the Persian Empire at Pelusium. The Persians had already taken Babylon and Egypt was no match. Psamtik III was defeated and briefly escaped to Memphis, before he was ultimately imprisoned and, later, executed at Susa, the capital of the Persian king Cambyses, who now assumed the formal title of Pharaoh. 28th-30th Dynasties The Twenty-Eighth Dynasty (Twenty-eighth dynasty of Egypt) consisted of a single king, Amyrtaeus, prince of Sais (Sais, Egypt), who rebelled against the Persians. He left no monuments with his name. This dynasty lasted 6 years, from 404 BC to 398 BC. Biography Tefnakht erected two donation stelas in Years 36 and 38 of Shoshenq V as a Prince at Saïs. His Year 38 stela from Buto is significant not only because Tefnakht employs the rather boastful epithet of "Great Chief of the entire land" but due to its list of his religious titles as '''prophet of Neith, Edjo and the Lady of Imay'''. Kitchen, The Third Intermediate Period in Egypt, p.362 This reflects his control over Sais, Buto to the north and Kom el-Hish to the southwest even prior to the end of the 22nd Dynasty—with the death of Shoshenq V—and reflects Tefnakht's political base in the Western Delta region of Egypt. The 22nd Dynasty was politically fragmenting even prior to the death of Shoshenq V. Tefnakht established his capital at Sais (Sais, Egypt), and formed an alliance with other minor kings of the Delta (Nile Delta) region in order to conquer Middle and Upper Egypt, which was under the sway of the Nubian king Piye. He was able to capture and unify many of the cities of the Delta region, thus making Tefnakht considerably more powerful than any of his predecessors in either the 22nd (Twenty-second dynasty of Egypt) or 23rd dynasties. '''Bakenranef''', known by the ancient Greeks as '''Bocchoris''', Bakenranef's name is consistently ''Bocchoris'' in the Greek accounts and in Tacitus; the decipherment of Egyptian hieroglyphics (Champollion) has permitted the reconstruction of his authentic Egyptian name. was briefly a king of the Twenty-fourth dynasty of Egypt. Based at Sais (Sais, Egypt) in the western Delta, he ruled Lower Egypt from c. 725 to 720 BC. Though the Ptolemaic period Egyptian historian Manetho Manetho, frags. 64, 65. considers him the sole member of the Twenty-fourth dynasty, modern scholars include his father Tefnakht in that dynasty. Although Sextus Julius Africanus quotes Manetho as stating that "Bocchoris" ruled for six years, some modern scholars again differ and assign him a shorter reign of only five years, based on evidence from an Apis Bull burial stela. It establishes that Bakenranef's reign ended only at the start of his 6th regnal year which, under the Egyptian dating system, means he had a reign of 5 full years. Bakenranef's prenomen or royal name, ''Wahkare'', means "Constant is the Spirit of Re" in Egyptian. Peter A. Clayton, ''Chronicle of the Pharaohs: The Reign-by-Reign Record of the Rulers and Dynasties of Ancient Egypt'', Thames and Hudson, London, 1994. p.188 Osorkon probably lived into his eighties, which explains why he appointed his son Takelot as the junior coregent to the throne in his final years. He would have been in failing health by this time. Osorkon III's coregency with Takelot III is the last attested royal coregency in ancient Egyptian history. Later dynasties from Nubia, Sais (Sais, Egypt), and Persia (Achaemenid Empire) all ruled Egypt with a single king on the throne.


temple+ancient

Isis.html Isis and Osiris ''", ch. 9. There are today no surviving traces of this town prior to the Late New Kingdom (c.1100 BC) due to the extensive destruction of the city by the ''Sebakhin (Sebakh)'' (farmers removing mud brick deposits for use as fertilizer) leaving only a few relief blocks ''in situ''. Medical school The Temple of Sais had a medical school associated with it, as did many Egyptian temple ancient Egyptian temples


526

, Egypt Abydos and Saïs (Sais, Egypt) in the Late period. Medical papyri show empirical knowledge (A priori and a posteriori (philosophy)) of anatomy, injuries, and practical treatments. Stroual (1989) pp. 244–46 '''Amasis II''' ( ) or '''Ahmose II''' was a pharaoh (570 B.C.E. – 526 B.C.E.) of the Twenty-sixth dynasty of Egypt, the successor of Apries at Sais (Sais, Egypt). He was the last great ruler of Ancient Egypt Egypt

reign from the new capital of Sais (Sais, Egypt). Four successive Saite kings continued guiding Egypt successfully and peacefully from 610-526 BC, keeping the Babylonians away with the help of Greek (Greece) mercenaries. Amasis, however, reportedly treated Apries' mortal remains with respect and observed the proper funerary rituals by having Apries' body carried to Sais (Sais, Egypt) and buried there with "full military honours." ref name "Shaw & Nicholson, p.37


medical studies

, and Zipporah's experience with circumcision, referenced in Exodus 4:25, may indicate medical studies. * Archeological description

Sais, Egypt

'''Sais''' ( ) or '''Sa el-Hagar''' was an ancient Egyptian town in the Western Nile Delta on the Canopic (Canopus, Egypt) branch of the Nile. Mish, Frederick C., Editor in Chief. "Saïs." ''Webster's Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary (Webster's Dictionary#The Collegiate Dictionary)''. 9th ed. Springfield, MA: Merriam-Webster Inc., 1985. ISBN 0-87779-508-8, ISBN 0-87779-509-6 (indexed), and ISBN 0-87779-510-X (deluxe). It was the provincial capital of Sap-Meh, the fifth nome (nome (Egypt)) of Lower Egypt and became the seat of power during the Twenty-fourth dynasty of Egypt (c. 732–720 BC) and the Saite Twenty-sixth dynasty of Egypt (664–525 BC) during the Late Period (Late Period of Ancient Egypt). Ian Shaw & Paul Nicholson, The Dictionary of Ancient Egypt, British Museum Press, 1995. p.250 Its Ancient Egyptian name was '''Zau'''.

Search by keywords:


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017