Saint-François-du-Lac, Quebec

What is Saint-François-du-Lac, Quebec known for?


critically

impresses Major Robert Rogers with a discussion about the Northwest Passage and is chosen as one of Rogers' aides. Setting out with a force of Rangers, Stockbridge Indians (Mahican) and Mohawk Indians (Mohawk nation), the troops are not told their destination. The Mohawks, who are closely allied with Sir William Johnson (Sir William Johnson, 1st Baronet), are jealous of Rogers' preference for the Stockbridge Indians and decide to leave. Hunk and McNott, among others, are critically


brilliant

on the city of Quebec (Quebec City). Major General Jeffrey Amherst (Jeffrey Amherst, 1st Baron Amherst), the newly appointed Commander-in-Chief of British forces in North America (Commander-in-Chief, North America), had a brilliant and definitive idea: He dispatched Rogers and his rangers on an expedition far behind enemy lines to the west against the Abenakis at Saint-Francis (Saint-François-du-Lac, Quebec) in Quebec, a staging base for native raids into New England. Rogers led


quot historical

of the Seven Years War in 1754, when most joined and merged into the Abenaki tribes at Saint-François-du-Lac, Quebec or moved further west. Spady, James O'Neil. "As if in a Great Darkness: Native American Refugees of the Middle Connecticut River Valley in the Aftermath of King Phillip's War: 1677-1697," ''Historical Journal of Massachusetts'', Vol. 23, no. 2 (Summer, 1995), 183-197. Small bands remained in Massachusetts as late as the 19th century, but most fled north or lost their tribal identity through intermarriage with other tribes and settlers. Many of the present-day Abenaki of New Hampshire, Vermont, and Canada are of part-Pocumtuck ancestry. This failure did not deter Hazen from offering a new route for invading Canada. This route went from Newbury, where Hazen owned land and knew the area, to Saint Francis, Quebec (Saint-François-du-Lac, Quebec). On July 12, Hazen departed Newbury to scout the route. By July 25, he had returned to White Plains; the effort was abandoned for the time being because the manpower was needed in the New York area. Plans for possible attacks against Quebec based on routes departing from the Newbury area were again contemplated in the fall of 1778, but Washington continued to resist the idea. Everest (#Everest), pp. 60–61


home quot

.): ''Handbook of North American Indians. Vol. 15. Northeast''. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington D.C. 1978 ISBN 0-16004-575-4 Two tribal communities formed, one once known as Saint-Francois-du-lac (Saint-François-du-Lac, Quebec) near Pierreville, Quebec (now called Odanak, Abenaki for "coming home"), and the other near Bécancour (Bécancour, Quebec) (now known as Wôlinak) on the south shore of the Saint Lawrence River, directly across the river from Trois-Rivières. These two Abenaki reserves continue to grow and develop. Since the year 2000, the total Abenaki population (on and off reserve) has doubled to 2,101 members in 2011. Approximately 400 Abenaki reside on these two reserves, which cover a total area of less than long, with many blockhouses along its route to protect supplies and travelers through the wilderness that would later become Vermont. With the defeat of the French in 1761, and the Treaty of Paris (Treaty of Paris (1763)) in 1763, the need for the fort ended. At the close of the war, many Pocumtuck, Nipmuc, and other tribes fled to Schaghticoke (Schaghticoke (village), New York), a village on the Hudson River. They remained there until the outbreak of the Seven Years War in 1754, when most joined and merged into the Abenaki tribes at Saint-François-du-Lac, Quebec or moved further west. Spady, James O'Neil. "As if in a Great Darkness: Native American Refugees of the Middle Connecticut River Valley in the Aftermath of King Phillip's War: 1677-1697," ''Historical Journal of Massachusetts'', Vol. 23, no. 2 (Summer, 1995), 183-197. Small bands remained in Massachusetts as late as the 19th century, but most fled north or lost their tribal identity through intermarriage with other tribes and settlers. Many of the present-day Abenaki of New Hampshire, Vermont, and Canada are of part-Pocumtuck ancestry. This failure did not deter Hazen from offering a new route for invading Canada. This route went from Newbury, where Hazen owned land and knew the area, to Saint Francis, Quebec (Saint-François-du-Lac, Quebec). On July 12, Hazen departed Newbury to scout the route. By July 25, he had returned to White Plains; the effort was abandoned for the time being because the manpower was needed in the New York area. Plans for possible attacks against Quebec based on routes departing from the Newbury area were again contemplated in the fall of 1778, but Washington continued to resist the idea. Everest (#Everest), pp. 60–61


234

in Sainte-Flavie in New Richmond br>

; The Baker River's name recalls Lt. Thomas Baker (1682–1753), whose company of 34 scouts from Northampton, Massachusetts passed down the river's valley in 1712 and destroyed a Pemigewasset Indian village. It was along this river on April 28, 1752 that John Stark and Amos Eastman were captured


134

in Valleyfield in Longueuil (Longueuil, Quebec) br>


childrens

Stockbridge man and detention of Captain Quinten Kennedy of the Rogers' Rangers, Major Robert Rogers led a party of approximately 150 English regulars, volunteers and Mahican into the village of Odanak, Quebec (Saint-François-du-Lac, Quebec). They killed up to 30 Abenaki people, among them women and children, as confirmed via conflicting reports. Bruchac, Marge, childrens-books malians-song additional_resources rogers_raid_facts.pdf


132

postal_code_type Postal code(s) (Canadian postal code) postal_code J0G 1M0 (List of J postal codes of Canada) area_code 450 and 579 (Area codes 450 and 579) blank_name Highways blank_info '''Saint-François-du-Lac''' is a community in the Nicolet-Yamaska Regional County

Municipality of Quebec, Canada. The population as of the Canada 2011 Census was 1,957. It is located at the confluence of the Saint Lawrence (Saint Lawrence River) and Saint-François (Saint-François River) rivers, at the edge of Lac Saint-Pierre (hence its name, "Saint-François of the lake"). Saint-François-du-Lac faces the town of Pierreville (Pierreville, Quebec) from across the Saint-François River, and lies at the junction of Quebec Route 132 Route 132

in La Pocatière in Sainte-Luce


childrens+books

Stockbridge man and detention of Captain Quinten Kennedy of the Rogers' Rangers, Major Robert Rogers led a party of approximately 150 English regulars, volunteers and Mahican into the village of Odanak, Quebec (Saint-François-du-Lac, Quebec). They killed up to 30 Abenaki people, among them women and children, as confirmed via conflicting reports. Bruchac, Marge, childrens-books malians-song additional_resources rogers_raid_facts.pdf


location title

&q Saint-François-du-Lac,_Quebec (Google Maps)

Saint-François-du-Lac, Quebec

'''Saint-François-du-Lac''' is a community in the Nicolet-Yamaska Regional County Municipality of Quebec, Canada. The population as of the Canada 2011 Census was 1,957. It is located at the confluence of the Saint Lawrence (Saint Lawrence River) and Saint-François (Saint-François River) rivers, at the edge of Lac Saint-Pierre (hence its name, "Saint-François of the lake").

Saint-François-du-Lac faces the town of Pierreville (Pierreville, Quebec) from across the Saint-François River, and lies at the junction of Route 132 (Quebec Route 132) and Route 143 (Quebec Route 143).

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