Sable Island

What is Sable Island known for?


film story

3 , French public television. "Ile de sable" (2007) bonne compagnie In 2007, Matt Trecartin of Halifax directed ''Chasing Wild Horses'', a documentary about photographer Roberto Dutesco and his photography of the Sable Island horses.


frequent heavy

, and the provincial electoral district of Halifax Citadel, although the urban area of Halifax proper is some


prolific award

ship CS ''Mackay-Bennett'' (CS Mackay-Bennett)), and at isolated wireless posts such as Sable Island. He later took a job as a clerk at a pulp and paper mill in Liverpool (Liverpool, Nova Scotia), Nova Scotia, where he began his writing career. Raddall was a prolific, award-winning writer. He received Governor General's Awards for three of his books, ''The Pied Piper of Dipper Creek'' (1943 (1943 Governor General's Awards)), ''Halifax, Warden of the North'' ( 1948 Governor General's


published quot

beginning in 1802 when Nova Scotia author Thomas Chandler Haliburton published "The Sable Island Ghost", a story about a ghostly woman inspired by the loss of the brig ''Francis'' in 1798. His story helped raise support for the establishment of a rescue station on the island. Gail Anne McNeil, "Sable Island, the Graveyard of the Atlantic", in ''Disasters at Sea'', Tony Cranston (1986), p. 119. Canadian writer James MacDonald Oxley wrote a youth novel


natural landscape

'' near Sable, although the island is erroneously portrayed with trees and a giant stone lighthouse. Sable Island is the setting for the 2002 film ''Touching Wild Horses'' starring Jane Seymour (Jane Seymour (actress)); however, little attempt was made to mimic the natural landscape of Sable, with trees and rocks abounding in the background of most every scene, Sandbanks Provincial Park in Ontario standing in for the island in the film.


unique landscape

. Although the island has a heliport, there is no runway for fixed wing aircraft, which land instead on south beach in an area designated as the Sable Island Aerodrome. Prior permission is required to land, as the area is often unusable due to changing sand conditions. Sable Island in popular culture The unique landscape, history of shipwrecks, and wildlife, especially horses, have made Sable Island an iconic place in Atlantic Canada and attracted considerable international following. In non-fiction Shipwreck survivors published early survival narratives about their experiences at Sable Island, beginning with the sinking of the ''Delight'' in 1583. Rainer K. Baehre “The Casting Away of the Delight” in ''Outrageous Seas: Shipwreck and Survival in the Waters off Newfoundland, 1583–1893'' McGill-Queens Press (1999), p. 12 The first formal history of the island, ''Sable Island: its History and Phenomena'', was written in 1894 by George Patterson. Many other histories of the island and its shipwrecks have been published since, such as Lyall Campbell's two books - ''Sable Island, Fatal and Fertile Crescent'' in 1974 and ''Sable Island Shipwrecks: Disaster and Survival at the North Atlantic Graveyard'' in 1994 - and more recently, ''A Dune Adrift: The Strange Origins and Curious History of Sable Island'', written in 2004 by Marq de Villiers. In fiction The island has also inspired works of fiction beginning in 1802 when Nova Scotia author Thomas Chandler Haliburton published "The Sable Island Ghost", a story about a ghostly woman inspired by the loss of the brig ''Francis'' in 1798. His story helped raise support for the establishment of a rescue station on the island. Gail Anne McNeil, "Sable Island, the Graveyard of the Atlantic", in ''Disasters at Sea'', Tony Cranston (1986), p. 119. Canadian writer James MacDonald Oxley wrote a youth novel ''The Wreckers of Sable Island'' in 1897. Frank Parker Day's 1928 novel ''Rockbound'' features a vivid depiction of the sinking of the schooner ''Sylvia Mosher'' during the 1926 August Gales (1926 Atlantic hurricane season) at Sable Island. Gwendolyn Davies, "Afterword", ''Rockbound'', University of Toronto Press (1989), p. 302 One of the island's most notable temporary residents was Nova Scotian author Thomas H. Raddall, whose early experiences working at the wireless post there served as the inspiration for his 1950 novel ''The Nymph and the Lamp''.


oceanfront

coast of North America from Sable Island off Nova Scotia, to the Shackleford Banks of North Carolina. While these are often referred to as "wild" horses, they are not truly "wild" in the biological sense of having no domesticated ancestors. thumb left Oceanfront flooding in Ocean City, New Jersey (File:Perfect Storm Oceanfront flooding.jpg) The Halloween Storm of 1991 left significant damage along the east coast of the United States, primarily in Massachusetts


fiction book

northeast of Sable Island. The ''Andrea Gail'' sank while returning to Gloucester, its debris washing ashore over the subsequent weeks. The crew of six was presumed killed after a Coast Guard search was unable to find them. The storm and the boat's sinking became the center-piece for Sebastian Junger's best-selling non-fiction book ''The Perfect Storm'' (The Perfect Storm (book)) (1997), which was adapted to a major Hollywood film in 2000 as The Perfect Storm


biography amp

as the first superintendent of the island. Morris settled on the island in October 1801 with his family. By the time Morris died on the island in 1809, he had built up the humanitarian settlement to include a central station, two rescue boat stations, several lookout posts and survivor shelters.

(magazine) ''National Geographic'' during a visit with Alexander Graham Bell. In more recent times, Roberto Dutesco, a fashion photographer, began taking photos of Sable horses in 1994 and features this work in a permanent photo exhibition entitled "


rich fishing

; Shipwrecks Sable Island is famous for its large number of shipwrecks. An estimated 350 vessels are believed to have fallen victim to the island's sand bars. Thick fogs, treacherous currents, and the island's location in the middle of a major transatlantic shipping route and rich fishing grounds account for the large number of wrecks. The first

Sable Island

'''Sable Island''' (French: ''île de Sable'') is a small island situated in Nova Scotia. The island is also a protected National Park Reserve of Canada (Sable Island National Park Reserve).

thumbnail Nautical Chart, Atlantic Sea Pilot, 1884 (File:IMRAY(1884) p0187 SABLE ISLAND.jpg)

Search by keywords:


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017