Rotuma

What is Rotuma known for?


winning film

, Island Directory, United Nations Environment Programme


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settlers came from Tonga and Kiribati. In the 1850s and 1860s, Tongan Prince Ma'afu claimed Rotuma and sent subordinates to administer the main island and islets. "The Rotuman People", p. 4, in Te'o Tuvale, ''An Account of Samoan History up to 1918'' Ratzel The History of Mankind by Professor

in Fiji from western Melanesia approximately 3,500 years ago, though the exact origins of the Fijian people are unknown. Later they would move onward to other surrounding islands including Rotuma,as well as blending with other (Polynesian) settlers on Tonga and Samoa. They are indigenous to all parts of Fiji except the island of Rotuma. The original settlers are now called "Lapita people" after a distinctive pottery produced locally. Lapita pottery was found in the area from 800 BC onward. '''Fijian people''' are the major indigenous people of the Fiji Islands (Fiji), and live in an area informally called Melanesia. The Fijian people are believed to have arrived in Fiji from western Melanesia approximately 3,500 years ago, though the exact origins of the Fijian people are unknown. Later they would move onward to other surrounding islands including Rotuma,as well as blending with other (Polynesian) settlers on Tonga and Samoa. They are indigenous to all parts of Fiji except the island of Rotuma. The original settlers are now called "Lapita people" after a distinctive pottery produced locally. Lapita pottery was found in the area from 800 BC onward. Fiji's Parliament is bicameral. The House of Representatives (House of Representatives (Fiji)) has 71 members. 25 of these are elected by universal suffrage. The remaining 46 are reserved for Fiji's ethnic communities and are elected from communal electoral rolls: 23 Fijians (Fijian people), 19 Indo-Fijians, 1 Rotuman, and 3 "General electors (General Electors (Fiji))" (Europeans, Chinese, and other minorities (minority group)). The upper chamber of the parliament, the Senate (Senate (Fiji)), has 32 members, formally appointed by the President (List of Presidents of Fiji) on the nomination of the Great Council of Chiefs (Great Council of Chiefs (Fiji)) (14), the Prime Minister (List of Prime Ministers of Fiji) (9), the Leader of the Opposition (Leader of the Opposition (Fiji)) (8), and the Rotuman Islands Council (1). The Senate is less powerful than the House of Representatives; the Senate may not initiate legislation, but it may reject or amend it. Fiji is divided administratively into four division (division (subnational entity))s, which are further subdivided into fourteen provinces; the self-governing island http: en.wikisource.org wiki Rotuma_Act http: www.itc.gov.fj lawnet fiji_act inter_act_list.html http: books.google.com books?id B9Qww9fVkGIC&pg PA239&lpg PA239&dq rotuma+free+association&source bl&ots yyE_6WYTgQ&sig 3SMYyQfkQjvX_1i8WK5wqfY9LPA&hl en&ei bIE3TPWxF8G88gaD2OSmBg&sa X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 1&ved 0CBIQ6AEwAA#v onepage&q rotuma%20free%20association&f false of Rotuma and its dependencies lie outside any of the four divisions. Each division is headed by a ''Commissioner,'' appointed by the Fijian government. The divisions are basically agglomerations of provinces and have few administrative functions of their own, but serve to foster cooperation among the member provinces for providing services. Each province has a ''provincial council'' which may make bylaws and impose rates (local taxes), subject to the approval of the Fijian Affairs Board, a government department. The board must also approve the appointment of the ''Roko Tui,'' or executive head of the provincial council, who is usually a high chief (Ratu), although in recent years, commoners have sometimes been chosen. left thumb Map of the divisions of Fiji. (Image:Fiji divisions named.png) Additionally, the island of Rotuma, north of the main archipelago, is self-governing according to the Rotuma Act promulgated in 1927. The Fiji government includes it in the Eastern Division for statistical purposes (such as the census), but it has its own council (Council of Rotuma) which is empowered to legislate on most local matters. Like a province, Rotuma chooses (through its council) 3 members of the Great Council of Chiefs and 1 Senator. :''see also'': Constituencies of Fiji (House_of_Representatives_(Fiji)#Open_Electorates) In Fiji, prior to the December 2006 military coup (2006 Fijian coup d'état), elections were held under the 1997 Constitution (Constitution of Fiji), which allotted 46 of the House of Representatives (House of Representatives of Fiji)' 71 seats on an ethnic basis. 23 were reserved for the indigenous majority, 19 for Indo-Fijians, 1 for Rotumans, and 3 for members of all other ethnic minorities. There was a strong tendency towards voting on ethnic lines. Thus, in the 1999 general election (Fijian general election, 1999), although the indigenous seats were split between several parties, all 19 Indo-Fijian seats were won by the Fiji Labour Party - which won none of the indigenous seats. In the 2001 general election (Fijian general election, 2001), the conservative indigenous nationalist Soqosoqo Duavata ni Lewenivanua party won 18 of the indigenous seats, with the other 5 going to the ultra-nationalist Conservative Alliance (Conservative Alliance (Fiji)) - which later merged into the SDL. All 19 "Indian" seats were retained by the Labour Party. In the 2006 general election (Fijian general election, 2006), all Indo-Fijian seats remained safely Labour, while the SDL won all 23 indigenous seats. Among other minorities, only the communal seat of West Central (West Central (General Electors Communal Constituency, Fiji)) was a safe seat for the ethnic United Peoples Party (United Peoples Party (Fiji)). "Elections 1999 Results Summary", Fiji Elections Office "2001 election: summary by open seats and type of communal seats", iji Elections Office "2006 election: Fijian communal constituencies" "2006 election: Indian communal constituencies" From England to the South Seas After attending school at Elizabeth College, Guernsey, Hocart matriculated at Exeter College (Exeter College, Oxford), Oxford (Oxford University) in 1902. He graduated with honors in "Greats (Literae Humaniores)", a degree combining Latin, Greek, ancient history, and philosophy. After his graduation in 1906 he spent two years studying psychology and phenomenology (Phenomenology (philosophy)) at the University of Berlin. With this broad and idiosyncratic training in hand, he was picked by W.H.R. Rivers to accompany him on the Percy Sladen Trust Expedition to the Solomon Islands in 1908. Their ethnographic work on 'Eddystone Island' (today known by its local name of Simbo) and in nearby Roviana, stands as one of the first modern anthropological field projects, and was the inspiration behind sections of Pat Barker's novel ''The Ghost Road''. Some of the data from the expedition appeared in Rivers' ''History of Melanesian Society'' in 1914, but most of their work did not make it into print until 1922, when Hocart began to publish a series of articles describing the core material. Immediately after his fieldwork in the Solomon Islands, Hocart travelled further east to Fiji, where he became the headmaster of Lakeba School, on the island of Lakeba in the Lau archipelago (Lau Islands). At the same time, he maintained a research affiliation with Oxford and traveled widely through western Polynesia, conducting research in Fiji, Rotuma, Wallis Island (Wallis and Futuna), Samoa, and Tonga. The result was roughly six years of ethnographic fieldwork that formed the basis for Hocart's reputation today as one of the most important early ethnographers of Oceania. **Nausori - Nausori International Airport '''(Base)''' **Rotuma - Rotuma Airport **Savusavu - Savusavu Airport *Nadi - Nadi International Airport '''Main hub''' *Rotuma - Rotuma Airport *Savusavu - Savusavu Airport Ah Koy's first foray into politics was in 1966, when he stood unsuccessfully as an independent candidate. In the early 1980s, he became manager of a family investment company owned by the then-Prime Minister (List of Prime Ministers of Fiji) Ratu Sir Kamisese Mara (Kamisese Mara), and was subsequently selected by Mara's political party (List of political parties in Fiji), the Fijian Alliance, as a candidate for one of eight seats then reserved for General Electors (General Electors (Fiji)) in the House of Representatives (House of Representatives (Fiji)) in the parliamentary election (Fiji election of 1982) of 1982. In 1991–1993, he led a legal challenge to the law requiring all multiracial people to register on the General Electors' (General Electors (Fiji)) roll, which enrolls all Fijian citizens who are neither indigenous (Fijian people) nor of Indian (Indo-Fijian) or Rotuman ancestry. The court ruled that as he was registered in the Native Land Register (Native Land Register (Fiji)) (''Vola ni Kawa Bula'', or VKB, in Fijian (Fijian language)), he was entitled to be registered as a Fijian. He subsequently succeeded getting the law amended to give multiracial people the option of registering on either the General Electors' roll or on an ethnic role (Fijian, Indo-Fijian, or Rotuman) on which any of their ancestors would have been entitled to enroll. This change was later written into the Constitution (Constitution of Fiji), and allowed Ah Koy to stand for election from an ethnic Fijian communal constituency. (All seats in the House of Representatives were communal prior to 1999, and 46 of the 71 seats are still communal, elected from closed ethnic roles of voters registered as Fijians, Indo-Fijians, Rotumans, or General Electors). Origins The party was founded in 1990 as the political vehicle of the Great Council of Chiefs (Great Council of Chiefs (Fiji)), with the declared goal of uniting all indigenous Fijians (Fijian people). A new constitution (Constitution of Fiji) promulgated in 1990, following two military coups (Fiji coups of 1987) in 1987, abolished the "national (National Constituencies (Fiji))" parliamentary seats elected by universal suffrage (which had comprised almost half the House of Representatives); all members henceforth were to be elected by enrolled voters on "communal" electoral roles (Communal Constituencies (Fiji)) that were limited to specific ethnic communities, each of which had an allocated number of seats in the House (37 indigenous Fijians (Fijian people), 27 Indo-Fijians, 1 Rotuman, and 5 General Electors (General Electors (Fiji)) (Europeans, Chinese, Banaban Islanders (Banaba Island), and other minorities). The end to multiracial voting resulted in a trend towards intracommunal politics, and multiracial parties like the old Fijian Alliance of longtime Prime Minister (List of Prime Ministers of Fiji) Ratu Sir Kamisese Mara (Kamisese Mara) were therefore dissolved and replaced by parties representing principally a single ethnic group. *Fiji: **during the October–December 1987 secession agitation on one island, known as the Republic of Rotuma, led by Henry Gibson (remained in New Zealand), his style was ''Gagaj Sau Lagfatmaro'', rendered as Paramount chief or King of the Molmahao Clan. NB: This title was not recognised by the Rotuma Island Council as the titles Gagaja and Sau have never been used together. The closest thing to a paramount chief is the position of Fakpure, currently belonging to the district chief (gagaj 'es itu'u) of Noa'tau. **the British Sovereign (Monarchy of the United Kingdom) remains recognized as "Paramount Chief (Paramount_Chief_of_Fiji#Current_position)", even since the country became a republic on 7 October 1987; however, this is not an office of state Daniel Fatiaki is a Roman Catholic (Roman Catholic Church in Fiji) and a native of Rotuma, a Fijian Dependency (Local government of Fiji) which enjoys a measure of autonomy but is otherwise integrated into Fiji politically and economically despite its cultural divergence (Rotumans are Polynesian, unlike ethnic Fijians (Fijian people), who are predominantly of Melanesian stock). He is the first Rotuman to be appointed to the bench in Fiji, and his appointment as Chief Justice resulted in great public rejoicing on the island. He is married to Martha (Martha Fatiaki) and has 4 sons. He was made a Companion of the Order of Fiji (Order of Fiji), together with Vijay Singh, in 2004. '''Rotuman''', also referred to as ''Rotunan'', ''Rutuman'' or ''Fäeag Rotuma'', is an Austronesian language (Austronesian languages) spoken by the indigenous people of the South Pacific (Oceania) island group of Rotuma, an island with a Polynesian (Polynesian culture)-influenced culture that was incorporated as a dependency into the Colony of Fiji in 1881. Classification of Rotuman is difficult due to the large number of loan words from Samoan (Samoan language) and Tongan (Tongan language), as a result of much cultural exchange over the history of the Pacific. Linguist Andrew Pawley groups the language with the West Fijian languages in a West Fijian – Rotuman branch of the Central Pacific sub-group of Oceanic languages.


all

pollux pollux.nss.nima.mil NAV_PUBS SD pub126 126sec03.pdf While very secluded from much of Fiji proper, the large reef and untouched beaches are renowned as some of the most beautiful in all of Fiji. There are some islands located at a distance between 50 meters and 2 km from the main island, but still within the fringing reef: *Solnoho (south) *Solkope and Sari'i (southeast) *'Afgaha and Husia Rua (far southeast) *Husia (Rotuma#Geography and geology) (Husiati'u

the Rotuma Island Council (Council of Rotuma) . The districts are divided into subgroupings of households (ho'aga) that function as work groups under the leadership of a subchief (gagaj 'es ho'aga). All district headmen and the majority of ho'aga headmen are titled. In addition, some men hold titles without headship (as tög), although they are expected to exercise leadership roles in support of the district headman. Titles, which are held for life, belong to specified house sites (fuạg ri). All

, Island Directory, United Nations Environment Programme *A.M. Hocart, Notes on Rotuman Grammar, Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, London, 1919, 252. External links * Rotuma website - an exhaustive website on all things Rotuman by anthropologists Alan Howard and Jan Rensel * The Land Has Eyes - an award-winning film set in Rotuma made by Rotumans. * Rotuman Hafa - Rotuman


small local

If you have plenty of time, Rotuma is a great place to experience the laid-back Polynesian lifestyle. There are excellent beaches, the best ones being on the south coast. Buy Eat Meals are provided by the families with whom you stay. The basic diet is taro, reef fish, and tinned meat. Drink There are some small local shops but these can run out of supplies. Consider taking some of your favourite drink with you. Sleep *'''Rotuma Homestay'''. There are no hotels on Rotuma. Arrangements to stay with families can be made. Connect Go next


winning

, Island Directory, United Nations Environment Programme *A.M. Hocart, Notes on Rotuman Grammar, Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, London, 1919, 252. External links * Rotuma website - an exhaustive website on all things Rotuman by anthropologists Alan Howard and Jan Rensel * The Land Has Eyes - an award-winning film set in Rotuma made by Rotumans. * Rotuman Hafa - Rotuman

repatriation of all Fijians of Indian descent, lost the two seats that it had won in the previous election (Fiji election of 1992). The five "general electorates," reserved for Fiji's European, Chinese, and other minorities, showed similarly little change, with the General Voters Party (General Voters Party (Fiji)) winning four seats and the All Nationals Congress (All Nationals Congress Party (Fiji)), one. There was a very significant change in the composition of the 27 Indo-Fijian

seats, however. The Fiji Labour Party lost 6 of its 13 seats, with the National Federation Party (National Federation Party (Fiji)) winning the remaining 20. The NFP leader, Jai Ram Reddy, enjoyed a personal rapport with Rabuka; although they did not enter into a formal coalition, their negotiations led to a substantial overhaul of the Fijian Constitution (Constitution of Fiji) which paved the way for the historic election of 1999, which brought Fiji's first Indo-Fijian Prime


main local

Supervisor of Elections and Ombudsman of Fiji Politics and society


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members of the House of Representatives were elected from "communal" constituencies on closed electoral rolls, for registered members of a particular ethnic group. 37 seats were allocated to ethnic Fijians and only 27 to Indo-Fijians, despite the near-equality of their numbers in the population; one seat was reserved for a representative of the Rotuman Islanders (Rotuma), with five "general electorates" set aside for various minorities including Europeans, Chinese, and Banaban Islanders (Banaba Island). The election produced little change among the 38 seats in the House of Representatives (House of Representatives (Fiji)) that were reserved for ethnic Fijians and Rotuman Islanders (Rotuma). The Fijian Political Party won 33 seats (a gain of three), and the Fijian Association Party of former Finance Minister Josefata Kamikamica won five (one down). The Fijian Nationalist Party of Sakeaki Butadroka, which advocated the forced repatriation of all Fijians of Indian descent, lost the two seats that it had won in the previous election (Fiji election of 1992). The five "general electorates," reserved for Fiji's European, Chinese, and other minorities, showed similarly little change, with the General Voters Party (General Voters Party (Fiji)) winning four seats and the All Nationals Congress (All Nationals Congress Party (Fiji)), one. There was a very significant change in the composition of the 27 Indo-Fijian seats, however. The Fiji Labour Party lost 6 of its 13 seats, with the National Federation Party (National Federation Party (Fiji)) winning the remaining 20. The NFP leader, Jai Ram Reddy, enjoyed a personal rapport with Rabuka; although they did not enter into a formal coalition, their negotiations led to a substantial overhaul of the Fijian Constitution (Constitution of Fiji) which paved the way for the historic election of 1999, which brought Fiji's first Indo-Fijian Prime Minister, Mahendra Chaudhry, to power. Electoral system Previously, all seats in the Fijian House of Representatives had been allocated on an ethnic basis, with the numbers deliberately skewed in favour of ethnic Fijians (Fijian people). In the 1990s, negotiations among Fiji's political and ethnic factions had led to an agreement to create 25 "open electorates," with Representatives of any race to be elected by universal suffrage; a further 46 Representatives would continue to represent ethnic communities and be elected from separate electoral rolls (23 ethnic Fijians, 19 Indo-Fijians, 1 Rotuman Islander (Rotuma), with an additional three "general electorates" to represent Fiji's minority communities, including Europeans, Chinese, and Banaban Islanders (Banaba Island)). '''Fijian people''' are the major indigenous people of the Fiji Islands (Fiji), and live in an area informally called Melanesia. The Fijian people are believed to have arrived in Fiji from western Melanesia approximately 3,500 years ago, though the exact origins of the Fijian people are unknown. Later they would move onward to other surrounding islands including Rotuma,as well as blending with other (Polynesian) settlers on Tonga and Samoa. They are indigenous to all parts of Fiji except the island of Rotuma. The original settlers are now called "Lapita people" after a distinctive pottery produced locally. Lapita pottery was found in the area from 800 BC onward. '''Fijian people''' are the major indigenous people of the Fiji Islands (Fiji), and live in an area informally called Melanesia. The Fijian people are believed to have arrived in Fiji from western Melanesia approximately 3,500 years ago, though the exact origins of the Fijian people are unknown. Later they would move onward to other surrounding islands including Rotuma,as well as blending with other (Polynesian) settlers on Tonga and Samoa. They are indigenous to all parts of Fiji except the island of Rotuma. The original settlers are now called "Lapita people" after a distinctive pottery produced locally. Lapita pottery was found in the area from 800 BC onward. Fiji's Parliament is bicameral. The House of Representatives (House of Representatives (Fiji)) has 71 members. 25 of these are elected by universal suffrage. The remaining 46 are reserved for Fiji's ethnic communities and are elected from communal electoral rolls: 23 Fijians (Fijian people), 19 Indo-Fijians, 1 Rotuman, and 3 "General electors (General Electors (Fiji))" (Europeans, Chinese, and other minorities (minority group)). The upper chamber of the parliament, the Senate (Senate (Fiji)), has 32 members, formally appointed by the President (List of Presidents of Fiji) on the nomination of the Great Council of Chiefs (Great Council of Chiefs (Fiji)) (14), the Prime Minister (List of Prime Ministers of Fiji) (9), the Leader of the Opposition (Leader of the Opposition (Fiji)) (8), and the Rotuman Islands Council (1). The Senate is less powerful than the House of Representatives; the Senate may not initiate legislation, but it may reject or amend it. Fiji is divided administratively into four division (division (subnational entity))s, which are further subdivided into fourteen provinces; the self-governing island http: en.wikisource.org wiki Rotuma_Act http: www.itc.gov.fj lawnet fiji_act inter_act_list.html http: books.google.com books?id B9Qww9fVkGIC&pg PA239&lpg PA239&dq rotuma+free+association&source bl&ots yyE_6WYTgQ&sig 3SMYyQfkQjvX_1i8WK5wqfY9LPA&hl en&ei bIE3TPWxF8G88gaD2OSmBg&sa X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 1&ved 0CBIQ6AEwAA#v onepage&q rotuma%20free%20association&f false of Rotuma and its dependencies lie outside any of the four divisions. Each division is headed by a ''Commissioner,'' appointed by the Fijian government. The divisions are basically agglomerations of provinces and have few administrative functions of their own, but serve to foster cooperation among the member provinces for providing services. Each province has a ''provincial council'' which may make bylaws and impose rates (local taxes), subject to the approval of the Fijian Affairs Board, a government department. The board must also approve the appointment of the ''Roko Tui,'' or executive head of the provincial council, who is usually a high chief (Ratu), although in recent years, commoners have sometimes been chosen. left thumb Map of the divisions of Fiji. (Image:Fiji divisions named.png) Additionally, the island of Rotuma, north of the main archipelago, is self-governing according to the Rotuma Act promulgated in 1927. The Fiji government includes it in the Eastern Division for statistical purposes (such as the census), but it has its own council (Council of Rotuma) which is empowered to legislate on most local matters. Like a province, Rotuma chooses (through its council) 3 members of the Great Council of Chiefs and 1 Senator. :''see also'': Constituencies of Fiji (House_of_Representatives_(Fiji)#Open_Electorates) In Fiji, prior to the December 2006 military coup (2006 Fijian coup d'état), elections were held under the 1997 Constitution (Constitution of Fiji), which allotted 46 of the House of Representatives (House of Representatives of Fiji)' 71 seats on an ethnic basis. 23 were reserved for the indigenous majority, 19 for Indo-Fijians, 1 for Rotumans, and 3 for members of all other ethnic minorities. There was a strong tendency towards voting on ethnic lines. Thus, in the 1999 general election (Fijian general election, 1999), although the indigenous seats were split between several parties, all 19 Indo-Fijian seats were won by the Fiji Labour Party - which won none of the indigenous seats. In the 2001 general election (Fijian general election, 2001), the conservative indigenous nationalist Soqosoqo Duavata ni Lewenivanua party won 18 of the indigenous seats, with the other 5 going to the ultra-nationalist Conservative Alliance (Conservative Alliance (Fiji)) - which later merged into the SDL. All 19 "Indian" seats were retained by the Labour Party. In the 2006 general election (Fijian general election, 2006), all Indo-Fijian seats remained safely Labour, while the SDL won all 23 indigenous seats. Among other minorities, only the communal seat of West Central (West Central (General Electors Communal Constituency, Fiji)) was a safe seat for the ethnic United Peoples Party (United Peoples Party (Fiji)). "Elections 1999 Results Summary", Fiji Elections Office "2001 election: summary by open seats and type of communal seats", iji Elections Office "2006 election: Fijian communal constituencies" "2006 election: Indian communal constituencies" From England to the South Seas After attending school at Elizabeth College, Guernsey, Hocart matriculated at Exeter College (Exeter College, Oxford), Oxford (Oxford University) in 1902. He graduated with honors in "Greats (Literae Humaniores)", a degree combining Latin, Greek, ancient history, and philosophy. After his graduation in 1906 he spent two years studying psychology and phenomenology (Phenomenology (philosophy)) at the University of Berlin. With this broad and idiosyncratic training in hand, he was picked by W.H.R. Rivers to accompany him on the Percy Sladen Trust Expedition to the Solomon Islands in 1908. Their ethnographic work on 'Eddystone Island' (today known by its local name of Simbo) and in nearby Roviana, stands as one of the first modern anthropological field projects, and was the inspiration behind sections of Pat Barker's novel ''The Ghost Road''. Some of the data from the expedition appeared in Rivers' ''History of Melanesian Society'' in 1914, but most of their work did not make it into print until 1922, when Hocart began to publish a series of articles describing the core material. Immediately after his fieldwork in the Solomon Islands, Hocart travelled further east to Fiji, where he became the headmaster of Lakeba School, on the island of Lakeba in the Lau archipelago (Lau Islands). At the same time, he maintained a research affiliation with Oxford and traveled widely through western Polynesia, conducting research in Fiji, Rotuma, Wallis Island (Wallis and Futuna), Samoa, and Tonga. The result was roughly six years of ethnographic fieldwork that formed the basis for Hocart's reputation today as one of the most important early ethnographers of Oceania. **Nausori - Nausori International Airport '''(Base)''' **Rotuma - Rotuma Airport **Savusavu - Savusavu Airport *Nadi - Nadi International Airport '''Main hub''' *Rotuma - Rotuma Airport *Savusavu - Savusavu Airport Ah Koy's first foray into politics was in 1966, when he stood unsuccessfully as an independent candidate. In the early 1980s, he became manager of a family investment company owned by the then-Prime Minister (List of Prime Ministers of Fiji) Ratu Sir Kamisese Mara (Kamisese Mara), and was subsequently selected by Mara's political party (List of political parties in Fiji), the Fijian Alliance, as a candidate for one of eight seats then reserved for General Electors (General Electors (Fiji)) in the House of Representatives (House of Representatives (Fiji)) in the parliamentary election (Fiji election of 1982) of 1982. In 1991–1993, he led a legal challenge to the law requiring all multiracial people to register on the General Electors' (General Electors (Fiji)) roll, which enrolls all Fijian citizens who are neither indigenous (Fijian people) nor of Indian (Indo-Fijian) or Rotuman ancestry. The court ruled that as he was registered in the Native Land Register (Native Land Register (Fiji)) (''Vola ni Kawa Bula'', or VKB, in Fijian (Fijian language)), he was entitled to be registered as a Fijian. He subsequently succeeded getting the law amended to give multiracial people the option of registering on either the General Electors' roll or on an ethnic role (Fijian, Indo-Fijian, or Rotuman) on which any of their ancestors would have been entitled to enroll. This change was later written into the Constitution (Constitution of Fiji), and allowed Ah Koy to stand for election from an ethnic Fijian communal constituency. (All seats in the House of Representatives were communal prior to 1999, and 46 of the 71 seats are still communal, elected from closed ethnic roles of voters registered as Fijians, Indo-Fijians, Rotumans, or General Electors). Origins The party was founded in 1990 as the political vehicle of the Great Council of Chiefs (Great Council of Chiefs (Fiji)), with the declared goal of uniting all indigenous Fijians (Fijian people). A new constitution (Constitution of Fiji) promulgated in 1990, following two military coups (Fiji coups of 1987) in 1987, abolished the "national (National Constituencies (Fiji))" parliamentary seats elected by universal suffrage (which had comprised almost half the House of Representatives); all members henceforth were to be elected by enrolled voters on "communal" electoral roles (Communal Constituencies (Fiji)) that were limited to specific ethnic communities, each of which had an allocated number of seats in the House (37 indigenous Fijians (Fijian people), 27 Indo-Fijians, 1 Rotuman, and 5 General Electors (General Electors (Fiji)) (Europeans, Chinese, Banaban Islanders (Banaba Island), and other minorities). The end to multiracial voting resulted in a trend towards intracommunal politics, and multiracial parties like the old Fijian Alliance of longtime Prime Minister (List of Prime Ministers of Fiji) Ratu Sir Kamisese Mara (Kamisese Mara) were therefore dissolved and replaced by parties representing principally a single ethnic group. *Fiji: **during the October–December 1987 secession agitation on one island, known as the Republic of Rotuma, led by Henry Gibson (remained in New Zealand), his style was ''Gagaj Sau Lagfatmaro'', rendered as Paramount chief or King of the Molmahao Clan. NB: This title was not recognised by the Rotuma Island Council as the titles Gagaja and Sau have never been used together. The closest thing to a paramount chief is the position of Fakpure, currently belonging to the district chief (gagaj 'es itu'u) of Noa'tau. **the British Sovereign (Monarchy of the United Kingdom) remains recognized as "Paramount Chief (Paramount_Chief_of_Fiji#Current_position)", even since the country became a republic on 7 October 1987; however, this is not an office of state Daniel Fatiaki is a Roman Catholic (Roman Catholic Church in Fiji) and a native of Rotuma, a Fijian Dependency (Local government of Fiji) which enjoys a measure of autonomy but is otherwise integrated into Fiji politically and economically despite its cultural divergence (Rotumans are Polynesian, unlike ethnic Fijians (Fijian people), who are predominantly of Melanesian stock). He is the first Rotuman to be appointed to the bench in Fiji, and his appointment as Chief Justice resulted in great public rejoicing on the island. He is married to Martha (Martha Fatiaki) and has 4 sons. He was made a Companion of the Order of Fiji (Order of Fiji), together with Vijay Singh, in 2004. '''Rotuman''', also referred to as ''Rotunan'', ''Rutuman'' or ''Fäeag Rotuma'', is an Austronesian language (Austronesian languages) spoken by the indigenous people of the South Pacific (Oceania) island group of Rotuma, an island with a Polynesian (Polynesian culture)-influenced culture that was incorporated as a dependency into the Colony of Fiji in 1881. Classification of Rotuman is difficult due to the large number of loan words from Samoan (Samoan language) and Tongan (Tongan language), as a result of much cultural exchange over the history of the Pacific. Linguist Andrew Pawley groups the language with the West Fijian languages in a West Fijian – Rotuman branch of the Central Pacific sub-group of Oceanic languages.


open

House of Representatives are allocated on a communal basis (Communal constituencies (Fiji)) to Fiji's various ethnic groups (Demographics of Fiji)) In addition, Rotuma forms part (along with Taveuni and the Lau Islands) of the Lau Taveuni Rotuma (Lau Taveuni Rotuma (Open Constituency, Fiji)) Open Constituency (Open Constituencies (Fiji)), one of 25 constituencies whose representatives are chosen by universal suffrage. Social control The basis for social control

as the successor to the defunct Alliance Party (Alliance Party (Fiji)) A constitutional review in 1997 introduced a new system, with 71 members. 25 are elected by universal suffrage from Open constituencies (Open constituencies (Fiji)) ("open" meaning that the franchise is open to all locally resident Fijian citizens, irrespective of their ethnic background), with the remaining 46 elected from communal constituencies, with 23 seats reserved for ethnic Fijians, 19 for Indo-Fijians, 1

for Rotuman Islanders, and 3 for "General Electors" - Europeans, Chinese, Banaban Islanders (Banaba Island), and other minorities. Every Fijian citizen eligible to vote thus has two votes - one for an open electorate, and one for a communal electorate. The system remains controversial, however. R Ra (Ra Province) - Seru RABENI (Seru Rabeni) - Rabi Council of Leaders - Rabi Island - Sitiveni RABUKA (Sitiveni Rabuka) - Lagani Rabukawaqa Lagani RABUKAWAQA


leadership roles

the Rotuma Island Council (Council of Rotuma) . The districts are divided into subgroupings of households (ho'aga) that function as work groups under the leadership of a subchief (gagaj 'es ho'aga). All district headmen and the majority of ho'aga headmen are titled. In addition, some men hold titles without headship (as tög), although they are expected to exercise leadership roles in support of the district headman. Titles, which are held for life, belong to specified house sites (fuạg ri). All


articles describing

to publish a series of articles describing the core material. Immediately after his fieldwork in the Solomon Islands, Hocart travelled further east to Fiji, where he became the headmaster of Lakeba School, on the island of Lakeba in the Lau archipelago (Lau Islands). At the same time, he maintained a research affiliation with Oxford and traveled widely through western Polynesia, conducting research in Fiji, Rotuma, Wallis Island (Wallis and Futuna), Samoa, and Tonga

Rotuma

'''Rotuma''' is a Fijian dependency (Local government of Fiji), consisting of Rotuma Island and nearby islets. The island group is home to a small but unique indigenous ethnic group which constitutes a recognisable minority within the population of Fiji, known as "Rotumans (Rotuman people)". Its population at the 2007 census was 2,002, although many Rotumans live on mainland Fijian islands, totaling 10,000.

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