Qatar

What is Qatar known for?


including legal

Brunei, Kuwait, Qatar, Bahrain, Oman, and the United Arab Emirates have become welfare states exclusively for their citizens. All foreign nationals, including legal residents and legal long term employees are prohibited from partaking in the benefits of the welfare state. - id "QA" QA Qatar 1974 .qa Wikipedia:Qatar Dmoz:Regional Middle East Qatar Commons:Category:Qatar


education science

oldplan In 2002, the Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development presented the School of Foreign Service (Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service) with the resources and space to open

Paris date February 11, 2008 accessdate January 6, 2009 Through the Medill School of Journalism and School of Communication (Northwestern University School of Communication), Qatar offers bachelors degrees in journalism and communication respectively. The Qatar Foundation for Education, Science

semester or a summer abroad, choosing from direct matriculation programs around the globe as well as programs of other universities and those run by Georgetown. Two of the most popular of Georgetown's own programs are those based in the University's villas in Alanya, Turkey and Fiesole, Italy. Doha, Qatar In 2002, the Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development presented the School of Foreign Service with the resources and space to open a facility in the new


national products

Modern attractions * The Museum of Islamic Art, Doha * Souq Waqif : the traditional old marketplace of Qatar. Has many good restaurants, especially at night time. Also sells many national products - bargaining is recommended. * The Pearl : a man-made island connected to Doha by a bridge. You can find a big variety of restaurants and shops, mainly in the high range. * Villaggio Mall: a spectacular Venetian style shopping mall with a canal and gondolas as well. A huge variety of shops from casual to luxury. * Mathaf : The Arab museum of modern art * Katara : Cultural village which is home to many international and Arab restaurants, a beautiful beach, and holds many cultural events. Definitely a place to see. * Aqua park : Aquatic Funfair. Buy 350px thumb The splendidly-restored Souq Waqif of Doha. (File:Souq Waqif with Qataris in foreground.jpg) The national currency is the '''Qatari riyal''' (QAR). The riyal is pegged to the US dollar at the rate of QR 3.64 to US $1. One riyal is divided into 100 dirham, with 1, 5, 10, 25 and 50 dirham coin denominations. The riyal is available in 1, 5, 10, 50, 100 and 500 banknote denominations. It is fairly straightforward to change major world currencies within Qatar, along with the currencies of Bahrain, Saudia Arabia and the UAE. Rates are fairly similar between banks and moneychangers, with a large concentration of moneychangers near the Gold Souq of Doha. Banks are abundant across Doha, with branches in the larger cities as well. Travellers cheques are accepted by the major banks. ''City Centre'' is currently the largest mall in Qatar and has many stores to choose from. Other malls include Landmark (includes a Marks & Spencer store), Hyatt Plaza, The Mall, Royal Plaza and Villagio. Blue Salon has huge sales twice a year where you can pick up Armani, Valentino and Cerutti suits for half price. There are many things to buy here but be wary of cheap pearls that have a high possibility of being fake. The many skilled tailors in Qatar make it a good place to have clothes made-to-fit. The souqs in the centre of Doha also have a lot to offer, although the goods are usually of cheaper quality than those of the malls. Prices are usually negotiable, so practice your bargaining skills. Souq Waqif (The Standing Souk) is the most interesting of the souqs; it was recently renovated to look as it did 50 or 60 years ago. You can buy anything from a turban to a pot large enough to cook a baby camel in! Do A great activity for tourists is simply to experience the nation's tradition. The traditional Qatari way of life was simple: Bedouin nomads wandering the desert with their camels, and fisherman scouring the ocean floor for pearls to trade. While these two lifestyles are mostly extinct on the peninsula, the government has taken some measures to preserve their traditions for future generations to experience. Many tour companies run '''desert expeditions''' by both four-wheel drive and camel. Some may just be for the day, while others can go for up to a week with trekkers camping overnight in a Bedouin tent. The one day "dune-bashing" tours simply involve speeding over the desert's endless dunes in a Landcruiser. The '''pearling''' tradition has existed as far back as 2000 BCE, when Mesopotamian records speak of shining "fish eyes" imported from the Gulf region. While the industry went bust after the discovery of oil, a large festival is held each year to celebrate the tradition. The '''Qatar Marine Festival''' in Doha often includes a huge sea expedition by various ''dhow'' boats to find oyster beds on the ocean floor. Other activities at the festival include a musical performance, a seal show, a sandsculptor's expedition and a water, light and sound show. Many companies offer '''shipwreck diving''' for tourists, which can be organised from Doha. Popular diving sites include the man-made Old Club Reef and New Club Reef just out of Messaied, Qapco Reef, the M.O. Shipwreck and the Al Sharque Shipwreck. Other popular '''watersports''' include kite-surfing, driving jet-skis, surfing and chartered fishing expeditions. Eat Qatar has seemingly endless options for food, much of it excellent. If you would like European cuisine in a fancy setting, visit a hotel like the Ramada or the Marriott, both of which also offer excellent sushi and the choice of having alcoholic drinks with your meal (the only restaurants in town that can do this are in the major hotels), but at a steep price. Authentic and delicious Indian and Pakistani food is found throughout the city, ranging from family-oriented places to very basic eateries catering to the Indian and Pakistani workers. You may attract some curious stares in the worker eateries, but the management will almost always be extremely welcoming, and the food is very inexpensive. Middle Eastern cuisine is everywhere as well, and in many forms—kebabs, breads, hummus, the list goes on. It can be purchased on the cheap from a take-out (many of which look quite unimpressive, but serve awesome food) or from a fancier place, like the wonderful Layali (near Chili's in the 'Cholesterol Corner' area) that serves gourmet Lebanese food and has hookahs with flavored tobacco. Refined Persian cuisine is available for reasonable prices in the royally appointed Ras Al-Nasa`a Restaurant on the Corniche (don't miss the cathedral-like rest rooms). Don't be afraid to venture into the Souqs looking for a meal; it will be a unique experience in an authentic setting, and although some of the places you see may look rundown, that's just the area in general, and the food will be probably be quite good. Be advised that many of the restaurants in the Souqs (as well as the shops) shut down during the afternoon hours. If you are in a funny kind of mood, you can try a McArabia—McDonald's Middle Eastern sandwich available only in the region. Drink There is one liquor store, Qatar Distribution Centre, in Doha. To purchase things there, you must have a license that can only be obtained by having a written letter of permission from your employer. You can only get a license when you have obtained your residency permit and you will need to get a letter from your employer confirming your salary in addition to paying a deposit for QR1000. The selection is good and is like any alcohol selection of a large supermarket in the West. Prices are reasonable although not cheap. Alcoholic beverages are available in the restaurants and bars of the major hotels, although they are pricey. Be aware, driving under the influence and public intoxication carry heavy penalties, including deportation, so be responsible. As far as non-alcoholic drinks go, be sure to hit some of the Indian and Middle Eastern restaurants and juice stalls. They whip up some tasty and exotic fruit juice combinations that really hit the spot. It is forbidden to bring alcohol in to the country as a tourist; at Doha airport customs xray bags and will confiscate any bottles of alcoholic drink. They will issue a receipt valid for 2 weeks to reclaim the alcohol on exit from the country. Sleep Hotel prices are on the rise in Qatar, and you can expect to pay as much as US$100 for an ordinary double room in a mid-range hotel. Budget accommodation does not seem to exist in Doha. The only hostelis ''very'' hard to find; even the taxi drivers at the airport may have to talk it over! It costs 100 Qatari Riyals per night if you don't have YHA membership, QR90 if you do. Learn Education City is a new project in Doha funded by the Qatari Government through the Qatar Foundation. It is the home to Qatar Academy, the Learning Centre, the Academic Bridge Program (similar to a college prep school), as well as branch campuses of Texas A&M University (Engineering) Weill Cornell Medical College (Medical) Virginia Commonwealth University (Arts and Communication), Carnegie Mellon University (Business and Computer Science), Georgetown University (School of Foreign Service), and the latest addition to the fold, Northwestern University (Journalism) and Faculty of Islamic Studies www.qfis.edu.qa all located in Education City to the east of Doha in the Rayyan area. In addition to this Education City is home to the Qatar Science and Technology Park, one of the only places in the Middle East undertaking research and development initiatives. The location of so many academics and students is very appealing for research focused organisations. The College of the North Atlantic (based in Newfoundland, Canada), also maintains a campus in Doha in the northern section of the city, near the local Qatar University. The University of Calgary (Nursing) is also in Qatar. And on the second semester of the 2012-2013 the Supreme Council Of Education will start E-learning Work The work day starts quite early in Qatar. Do not be surprised by 7AM meetings! In the summer, many small stores and Arab businesses will be open from 8AM-12PM and 4PM-8PM. During the "siesta", most people return home to escape the oppressive heat. Stay safe The emergency phone number for police, ambulance or fire department is '''999'''. Qatar is a significant contrast from the surrounding region, with no war, no conflict and minimal crime. Western women travelling on their own sometimes experience staring from local men, along with other unwanted curiosity. However, this is more of an annoyance than a threat, and Qatar officials deal harshly with any complaint of harassment. If you want to fit in better with the locals and attract less stares, a long, black cloak and headscarf worn by local women called the ''abaya'' can be purchased at a variety of places in Doha. Travelling on the roads is probably the largest danger to your wellbeing. Although being safer than most other Asian and Middle Eastern drivers, Qataris often ignore road rules and are intolerant of pedestrians attempting to cross the road. Be safe when walking near or over major highways. Dust storms and sandstorms are another major issue, being common throughout the dry summer. These natural events can shroud the country in darkness and cause severe respiratory issues. If a sandstorm is approaching, immediately seek shelter or wear a facemask. Stay healthy Drink lots of bottled water! No matter how much you drink, you should drink more. Likewise, take proper precautions for the sun, including clothing that covers your skin and sunscreen. Respect Respect the Islamic beliefs of Qataris and Bedouins: While there is no legal requirement to wear the hijab, women shouldn't wear tube tops and skimpy outfits, although there is no strict rule and women are free to dress as they feel. It is absolutely acceptable for any nationality to wear the traditional Qatari clothes, the thobe. If you're dining with a Qatari, don't expose the bottoms of your feet to him her. Don't eat with your left hand either, since the left hand is seen as the 'dirty hand'. Similarly, don't attempt to shake hands or hand a package with your left hand. If your Qatari friend insists on buying you something—a meal or a gift—let him! Qataris are extremely hospitable, and typically there are no strings attached. It is generally a custom to argue for the bill. Cope Newspapers * Gulf Times newspaper * The Peninsula newspaper * I Love Qatar Community News * Al Watan Arabic newspaper * Qatar Tribune * Marhaba Magazine Connect By phone When calling from abroad, the country code of Qatar is '''974'''. There are no city or area codes. When calling overseas while within Qatar, the international access code is usually '''0'''. Qatari phone numbers now have eight digits. Previously, they contained seven, but this was changed by the government regulator in 2010. If you encounter a number with only seven digits, you can still use it by repeating the first digit. For example, a phone number that previously began with '3' would now start with '33'. Previously, Qtel, a government-owned company, held a monopoly over telecommunications in the country. Although this changed in 2006 when the Emir allowed new companies to be formed, competition is still weak with only two major operators: *'''Ooredoo''' (formerly ''Qtel'') - the "Hala" prepaid starter pack costs QR 50 with QR 25 of initial credit. International calls to most countries costs QR 0.66 minute. Has overall better coverage than Vodafone. *'''Vodafone Qatar''' - prepaid sim packs start from QR 60 with an initial credit of QR 35. International calls to most countries costs QR 0.66 minute. By post Qatar has a fairly efficient postal system run by '''Q-Post'''. There are dozens of post offices scattered across Doha, along with branches in many major cities. It costs QR 2.50 to send a standard postcard to most Western countries. The price drops down to QR 1 to 1.50 when sending a postcard domestically or to most nations within the Middle East and North Africa. Sending parcels can get costly, being counted per kilogram and by distance. A full list of rates and branch locations can be found on the Q-Post website. Addresses on international letters and postcards should be formatted as: :Name of recipient :House number and street name :City, Postal code :Country Wikipedia:Qatar Dmoz:Regional Middle East Qatar Commons:Category:Qatar


international public

countries to be produced and distributed by the tourism ministries of those countries, so these ads often carry political statements and or depictions of the foreign government's desired international public perception (Perception management). Additionally, a wide range of foreign airlines and travel-related services which advertise separately from the destinations, themselves, are owned by their respective governments; examples include, though are not limited to, the Emirates (airline

or alternative intended purpose of promoting good sentiments or improving existing ones among the target audience towards a given nation or region. It is common for advertising promoting foreign countries to be produced and distributed by the tourism ministries of those countries, so these ads often carry political statements and or depictions of the foreign government's desired international public perception (Perception management). Additionally, a wide range of foreign airlines and travel


game program

(Turkic (Turkic languages) vs. Turkish (Turkish language), Finnic (Finnic languages) vs. Finnish (Finnish language)). Post-NBA After the end of his NBA career, Bol played 22 games for the Florida Beach Dogs of the Continental Basketball Association during the 1995-1996 season. In 1996, the Portland (Maine) Mountain Cats of the United States Basketball League announced that he would be playing with the team, and included him in the game program, but he never actually appeared


television commercial

governments, particularly those that own marketable commercial products or services, often promote their interests and positions through the advertising of those goods because the target audience is not only largely unaware of the forum as vehicle for foreign messaging but also willing to receive the message while in a mental state of absorbing information from advertisements during television commercial breaks, while reading a periodical, or while passing by billboards in public spaces. A prime

but also willing to receive the message while in a mental state of absorbing information from advertisements during television commercial breaks, while reading a periodical, or while passing by billboards in public spaces. A prime example of this messaging technique is advertising campaigns to promote international travel. While advertising foreign destinations and services may stem from the typical goal of increasing revenue by drawing more tourism, some travel campaigns carry the additional


public title

. Men are advised against wearing only shorts and singlets. As of 2014, certain provisions of the Qatari Criminal Code allows punishments such as flogging and stoning to be imposed as criminal sanctions. The UN Committee Against Torture found


historic fact

of this historic fact with the persecution of the Palestinian people." Wikipedia:Qatar Dmoz:Regional Middle East Qatar Commons:Category:Qatar


international signature

May 2011 The Paris store at 53, Avenue Montaigne closed in March 2006 because PVH (Phillips Van Heusen) decided it was unprofitable. It was the label's only international signature outlet owned by PVH (Phillips Van Heusen). The space is now occupied by German (Germany) fashion company Escada. A third store in Dallas' Highland Park was closed after 20 years in January 2006 for the same above-mentioned reason. There are other international locations


study energy

and the United Arab Emirates) have

Qatar

'''Qatar''' (

Following Ottoman (Ottoman Empire) rule, Qatar became a British protectorate in the early 20th century until gaining independence in 1971. Qatar has been ruled by the Al Thani (House of Thani) family since the mid-19th century. Qatar is an absolute monarchy and its head of state is Emir Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani. as most Qataris adhere to the strict Wahhabi interpretation (Wahhabi movement) of Islam. Sharia law is the main source of Qatari legislation according to Qatar's Constitution.

Qatar is the world's richest country per capita (List of countries by GDP (PPP) per capita) and has the highest human development (human development index) in the Arab World; furthermore, it is recognized as a high income economy by the World Bank.

Although tiny, Qatar wields significant clout. Qatar's rising international profile has led some analysts to identify it as a middle power.

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