Province of Silesia

What is Province of Silesia known for?


historical criticism

and Johann Salomo Semler. As a theology student Schleiermacher pursued an independent course of reading and neglected the study of the Old Testament and of Oriental languages. However, he did attend the lectures of Semler, where he became acquainted with the techniques of historical criticism of the New Testament, and of Johann Augustus Eberhard, from whom he acquired a love of the philosophy (philosophies) of Plato and Aristotle. At the same time he studied the writings of Immanuel Kant and Friedrich Heinrich Jacobi, and began to apply ideas from the Greek philosophers to a reconstruction of Kant's system. Background and early life Anderssen was born in Breslau (Wrocław) (now called Wrocław), in the Prussian (Kingdom of Prussia) Province of Silesia, in 1818. He lived there for most of his life, sharing a house with and supporting his widowed mother and his unmarried sister. He never married. Anderssen graduated from the public gymnasium (Gymnasium (school)) (high school) in Breslau (Wrocław) and then attended university, where he studied mathematics and philosophy. After graduating in 1847 at the age of 29, he took a position at the Friedrichs-Gymnasium as an instructor and later as Professor of Mathematics. Anderssen lived a quiet, stable, responsible, respectable middle-class life. His career was teaching mathematics, while his hobby and passion was playing chess. thumb right Reitsch in 1936 (File:Bundesarchiv Bild 183-W-0801-512, Rhön, Hanna Reitsch beim Segelflug-Wettbewerb.jpg) Reitsch was born in Hirschberg (Jelenia Góra), Silesia (Province of Silesia). Her father was an ophthalmologist (ophthalmology) who wanted her to become a doctor. She was interested in aviation, and thought she might become a flying doctor in North Africa and even studied medicine for a time. Reitsch began flying in 1932 with flights in gliders. She left medical school in 1933 at the invitation of Wolf Hirth to become a full-time glider pilot and instructor at Hornberg in Baden-Württemberg. She was soon breaking records, earning a Silver C Badge (FAI Gliding Commission#Badges) No 25 in 1934. She flew from Salzburg across the Alps in 1938 in a Sperber Junior. Reichsgaue established during the Second World War Of the territories annexed from Poland (Polish areas annexed by Nazi Germany) and the Free City of Danzig in 1939, Reichsgau Wartheland and Reichsgau Danzig-West Prussia were created. Annexed territories of pre-war Poland (Second Polish Republic) not within these two Reichsgaue was incorporated into the neighboring Gaue (Gau (country subdivision)) East Prussia and Silesia (Province of Silesia). The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg as well as Alsace-Lorraine, annexed from pre-war France in 1940, were attached to the bordering Southwestern Gaue of Nazi Germany. Two further Reichsgaue in Belgium were established in 1944, and also annexed ''de jure'' to Germany.


distinctive+personality

States, Mayer's home country. The three major towns of the Barossa each have a distinctive personality. Tanunda (Tanunda, South Australia) is generally recognised as the most German (Germans) of the three with long-standing traditions dating back to the 1840s when the first German (German settlement in Australia) settlers arrived in the area. Because many of them came from Prussian (Kingdom of Prussia) Silesia (Province of Silesia), they called the Barossa ''Neu-Schlesien'', or "


military family

and microbiology while he was there. Early life Mellenthin was born in Breslau (Wrocław), Silesia (Province of Silesia), into a military family; his father Paul Henning von Mellenthin was a lieutenant-colonel of artillery who was killed in action in 1918. Friedrich's older brother, Horst von Mellenthin, was also a World War II general. In 1924, upon graduation from Breslau's Realgymnasium, Friedrich enlisted as a private in the Seventh Cavalry Regiment of the Reichswehr


early life

mf y birth_place Breslau, Province of Silesia, Prussia death_date Reichsgaue established during the Second World War Of the territories annexed from Poland (Polish areas annexed by Nazi Germany) and the Free City of Danzig in 1939, Reichsgau Wartheland and Reichsgau Danzig-West Prussia were created. Annexed territories of pre-war Poland (Second Polish Republic) not within these two Reichsgaue was incorporated into the neighboring Gaue (Gau (country subdivision)) East Prussia and Silesia (Province of Silesia). The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg as well as Alsace-Lorraine, annexed from pre-war France in 1940, were attached to the bordering Southwestern Gaue of Nazi Germany. Two further Reichsgaue in Belgium were established in 1944, and also annexed ''de jure'' to Germany.


- life

mf y birth_place Breslau, Province of Silesia, Prussia death_date Early life Steinmetz was born as '''Carl August Rudolph Steinmetz''' to Carl Heinrich Steinmetz in Breslau, Province of Silesia. Steinmetz suffered from dwarfism, hunchback (Kyphosis), and hip dysplasia (Hip dysplasia (human)), as did his father and grandfather. Steinmetz attended Johannes Gymnasium (Gymnasium (school)) and astonished his

s and Poles. In 1884, 36 Jewish Zionist (Zionism) delegates met in Katowice (Katowice Conference), forming the Hovevei Zion movement. Previously part of the Beuthen district (Beuthen (district)), in 1873 it became the capital of the new Kattowitz district (Kattowitz (district)). On 1 April 1899, the city of Kattowitz was separated from the district, becoming an independent city. Early life and education Max was born on December 11, 1882 in Breslau (now Wrocław

, Poland), which at Born's birth was in the Prussian (Kingdom of Prussia) Province of Silesia in the German Empire. He was one of two children born to Gustav Born (Gustav Jacob Born), (b. 22 April 1850, Kempen, d. 6 July 1900, Breslau), an anatomist and embryologist, and Margarethe ('Gretchen') Kauffmann (b. 22 January 1856, Tannhausen, d. 29 August 1886, Breslau), from a Silesian family of industrialists. Early life Kaller was born in Bytom Beuthen (Bytom


years large

Institute of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society, in Breslau. In the following years, large groups of French Huguenots settled in Stettin, bringing new developments into the city crafts and factories. The population increased from 6000 in 1720 to 21,000 in 1816, and 58,000 in 1861. The 19th century was an age of large territorial expansion for the city, especially after 1873, when the old fortress was abolished. In 1821, the crafts corporations were abolished, and in steam transport on the Oder began, allowing further development of trade. The port was developing quickly, specialising in exports of agricultural products and coal from the Province of Silesia. Economic development and rapid population growth brought many ethnic Poles from Pomerania and Greater Poland looking for new career opportunities in the Stettin industry. More than 95% of the population consisted of Germans. In 1843, Stettin was connected by the first railway line to the Prussian capital Berlin, and in 1848 by the second railway to Posen (Poznań) (Poznań). New branches of industry were developed, including shipbuilding (at the AG Vulcan Stettin and Oderwerke shipyards) and ironworks using Swedish ores. Before World War I, there were 3,000 Polish inhabitants in the city, Tadeusz Białecki, "Historia Szczecina" Zakład Narodowy im. Ossolińskich, 1992 Wrocław; pgs. 9, 20-55, 92-95, 258-260, 300-306 including some wealthy industralists and merchants. Among them was Kazimierz Pruszak, director of the Gollnow industrial works, who predicted eventual "return of Szczecin to Poland". The population grew to 236,000 in 1910 and 382,000 in 1939. Bavaria Born in Trebnitz (Trzebnica) (Silesia (Province of Silesia)), and brought up in Nördlingen, he became a school teacher by profession. Philip Rees, ''Biographical Dictionary of the Extreme Right Since 1890'', 1990, p. 279 He joined the SPD (Social Democratic Party of Germany) in 1917 and was instrumental in the setting up of a short-lived Bavarian Soviet Republic in 1919. Indeed for a time at the start of the year, following the resignation of Kurt Eisner and immediately before the establishment of the Soviet Republic Niekisch wielded effective power as chairman of the central executive of Bavarian councils, an interim governing body. Chris Harman, ''The Lost Revolution: Germany 1918 to 1923'', Bookmarks, 1982, pp. 129-130 He left the SPD soon after and joined the USPD (Independent Social Democratic Party of Germany) for a time, before returning. History The first German licence plates that had a lettering plan were issued from 1906 onwards. Berlin for example was using I A (I for Prussia), Munich II A (II for Bavaria), Stuttgart III A (III for Württemberg (Free People's State of Württemberg)). Other German states used further Roman numbers such as IV (Baden (Republic of Baden)), V (Hesse (People's State of Hesse)), and VI (Alsace-Lorraine; now France). Many states used prefixes derived from the state names, such as B (Brunswick (Free State of Brunswick)), HB (Bremen), HH (Hamburg), and HL (Lübeck (Free City of Lübeck)), the latter three used again for the same entities since 1956. Other bigger cities: IV B Baden (Heidelberg, Mannheim, Karlsruhe, Freiburg, Lake Constance), II N Cities of Nuremberg and Fürth. The Prussian provinces had the following prefixes: I E Province of Brandenburg (to a minor part now Poland), I C Province of East Prussia (now divided between Lithuania, Poland and Russia), I S Province of Hannover, I T Province of Hesse-Nassau (Today Frankfurt, State of Hessen and neighboring counties), I L Province of Hohenzollern, I Z Rhine Province (Cologne, Düsseldorf and other large cities in the Ruhr Area), I H Province of Pomerania (now prevailingly Poland), I Y Province of Posen (now Poland), I B Province of Posen-West Prussia (now Poland), I M Province of Saxony, I P Province of Schleswig-Holstein, I K Province of Silesia (now mostly Poland), I X Province of Westphalia, and finally I D Province of West Prussia (now Poland). Šturm was born and raised in Görlitz, Prussian Silesia (Province of Silesia), when the Görlitz region was still part of the homeland of the Sorbs. His parents were both ethnic Sorbs (not Serbs). He finished the royal Prussian (Kingdom of Prussia) military academy in Breslau (Wrocław) (Wrocław) and went to Serbia before the Balkan wars to fight the Ottoman Turks, studying in the Serbian military academy (Serbian military) and volunteering in the Serbian Army. Cohn was born in Breslau in the Prussian (Kingdom of Prussia) Province of Silesia. At the age of 10 he suffered hearing impairment. He received a degree in botany in 1847 at the age of nineteen at the University of Berlin. He was a teacher and researcher at University of Breslau for his entire career. In the 1850s he mostly studied algae. In the 1860s he studied plant physiology in several different aspects. From 1870 onward he mostly studied bacteria. He published over 150 research reports during his lifetime. The University of Breslau became an innovative center for plant physiology and microbiology while he was there. Early life Mellenthin was born in Breslau (Wrocław), Silesia (Province of Silesia), into a military family; his father Paul Henning von Mellenthin was a lieutenant-colonel of artillery who was killed in action in 1918. Friedrich's older brother, Horst von Mellenthin, was also a World War II general. In 1924, upon graduation from Breslau's Realgymnasium, Friedrich enlisted as a private in the Seventh Cavalry Regiment of the Reichswehr. He studied for his commission over the next several years, and won a rare promotion to lieutenant in 1928 (the Reichswehr at the time having only 4,000 officers in its entirety). He married Ingeborg von Aulock, granddaughter of a South African emigrant, in 1932. Although he described himself as "perfectly happy" with regimental life, his superior assigned him to prepare operational reports to divisional headquarters, and these were generally approved of. In recognition of his talents, he was assigned to the Kriegsakademie in 1935, where he took its two-year course for General Staff officers. '''Max Karl Wilhelm von Gallwitz''' (2 May 1852 – 18 April 1937) was a German (Germany) general from Breslau (Wrocław) (Wrocław), Silesia (Province of Silesia), who served with distinction during World War I on both the Eastern (Eastern Front (World War I)) and Western Fronts (Western Front (World War I)). Reichsgaue established during the Second World War Of the territories annexed from Poland (Polish areas annexed by Nazi Germany) and the Free City of Danzig in 1939, Reichsgau Wartheland and Reichsgau Danzig-West Prussia were created. Annexed territories of pre-war Poland (Second Polish Republic) not within these two Reichsgaue was incorporated into the neighboring Gaue (Gau (country subdivision)) East Prussia and Silesia (Province of Silesia). The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg as well as Alsace-Lorraine, annexed from pre-war France in 1940, were attached to the bordering Southwestern Gaue of Nazi Germany. Two further Reichsgaue in Belgium were established in 1944, and also annexed ''de jure'' to Germany.


social research

November revolution (German Revolution) of 1918 and joined the Social Democratic Party (Social Democratic Party of Germany#Weimar Republic) (SPD). Neumann was instrumental in organizing the Socialist Students Society in Frankfurt am Main (Frankfurt), where in 1918 he met Leo Löwenthal, a future colleague in the Institute for Social Research in New York (New York City) under Max Horkheimer. At Breslau (the present-day Wroclaw in Poland), Leipzig, Rostock


national conservative

members were expelled . The museum was rearranged in 1950 and opened again in 1953. The club still exists in Germany, although its mission is obsolete. In view of the previous clashes of arms and the "lost" territories, the remaining German population from the beginning had a strong nationalistic (German nationalism) attitude, with the national conservative German National People's Party (DNVP) emerging as the strongest political power


wars

the Prussian King Frederick the Great had all conquered from the Austrian Habsburg Monarchy under Empress Maria Theresa in the 18th century Silesian Wars. It furthermore included the northeastern part of Upper Lusatia around Görlitz and Lauban (Lubań), ceded to Prussia by the Kingdom of Saxony according to the resolutions of the Vienna Congress (Congress of Vienna) in 1815. The province bordered on the Prussian heartland of Province of Brandenburg Brandenburg

Bohemian queen regnant, King Frederick the Great of Prussia had invaded Silesia, thereby starting the War of the Austrian Succession (1740–1748). By the end of the First Silesian War (Silesian Wars) in 1742, the Prussian forces had conquered almost all of the Habsburg crown land, while according to the peace treaties of Breslau (Treaty of Breslau) and Berlin (Treaty of Berlin (1742)), only some smaller parts in the extreme southeast, like the Duchy of Teschen as well

as the southern parts of the duchies of Troppau (Duchy of Troppau) and Nysa (Duchy of Nysa), remained possessions of the Habsburg Monarchy as Austrian Silesia. Attempts by Maria Theresa to regain the crown land in the Second Silesian War (Silesian Wars) (1744–1745) failed and she ultimately had to relinquish her claims by the Treaty of Dresden. The Seven Years' War (1756–1763) once again confirmed Prussian control over most of Silesia, and due to its predominantly Protestantism


political commitment

with the University of Frankfurt (Johann Wolfgang Goethe University of Frankfurt am Main). Throughout the Weimar years (Weimar Republic), Neumann's political commitment was to the laborist wing of the Social Democratic Party. From 1928 to 1933 he worked in Berlin in partnership with Ernst Fraenkel (Ernst Fraenkel (political scientist)) as an attorney specializing in labor law, representing trade unions and publishing briefs and articles, and a technical book in this innovative field. In 1932-33 he became lead attorney for the Social Democratic Party and published a brief, itself suppressed by the Nazis (Nazism), against the suppression of the principal Social Democratic newspaper. thumb left The ''Saxony provincial consistory'', in the background Magdeburg Cathedral Magdeburg's Cathedral (File:Bundesarchiv Bild 183-29427-0003, Magdeburg, Dom, 1000 Jahre.jpg). The ''Evangelical State Church of Prussia's older Provinces'' had substructures, called ecclesiastical province ( Reichsgaue established during the Second World War Of the territories annexed from Poland (Polish areas annexed by Nazi Germany) and the Free City of Danzig in 1939, Reichsgau Wartheland and Reichsgau Danzig-West Prussia were created. Annexed territories of pre-war Poland (Second Polish Republic) not within these two Reichsgaue was incorporated into the neighboring Gaue (Gau (country subdivision)) East Prussia and Silesia (Province of Silesia). The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg as well as Alsace-Lorraine, annexed from pre-war France in 1940, were attached to the bordering Southwestern Gaue of Nazi Germany. Two further Reichsgaue in Belgium were established in 1944, and also annexed ''de jure'' to Germany.

Province of Silesia

The '''Province of Silesia''' ( ; Silesian (Silesian language): ''Prowincyjŏ Ślōnskŏ'') was a province (Provinces of Prussia) of the German Kingdom of Prussia, existing from 1815 to 1919, when it was divided into the Upper (Upper Silesia Province) and Lower Silesia (Lower Silesia Province (Prussia)) provinces, and briefly again from 1938 to 1941. As a Prussian province, Silesia became part of the German Empire during the Prussian-led unification of Germany in 1871. The provincial capital was Breslau (Wrocław) (present-day Wrocław, Poland).

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