Princeton, British Columbia

What is Princeton, British Columbia known for?


development team

of Mayors of Rossland Mayor of Rossland for 16 years. Profili was chair of the Lower Columbia Community Development Team (LCCDT), and was a founding member of the Community Futures Committee and its chair for two years. He also chaired the Community Forest Advisory Committee (CFAC) and co-chaired the Highway 3B (British Columbia Highway 3B) Mayors Committee concerning highway issues from Princeton (Princeton, British Columbia) to the Alberta border. He was also the Regional District Finance Chairman for the Regional District of Kootenay-Boundary (Regional District of Kootenay Boundary, British Columbia). '''Princeton Aerodrome''', The '''Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen''' ('''RDOS''') is a regional district in southern British Columbia, adjacent to the U.S. (United States of America) state of Washington (Washington (U.S. state)). It is bounded by Fraser Valley Regional District to the west, Thompson-Nicola Regional District and Regional District of Central Okanagan to the north, Regional District of Kootenay Boundary to the east, and by Okanogan County, Washington to the south. As of the 2006 census (Canada 2006 Census) the population was 79,475. The district covers a land area of 10,413.44 km² (4,020.65 sq mi). The administrative offices are in the city of Penticton. Other important population centres include the district municipality of Summerland (Summerland, British Columbia), the towns of Oliver (Oliver, British Columbia), Osoyoos (Osoyoos, British Columbia), and Princeton (Princeton, British Columbia), and the village of Keremeos (Keremeos, British Columbia).


social service

; Princeton has a hospital and long-term care center (Princeton General Hospital and Ridgewood Lodge), two Seniors' Clubs and several seniors' and handicapped housing facilities, and a variety of drug and alcohol counseling services, an adult mental care drop-in center, a program for women in abusive relationships, and numerous other social service institutions. Princeton on film Image:Princeton, BC - fairgrounds.jpg thumb left Sunflower Downs, Princeton's fair


work+documentary

O'Donoghue first Annie year 2001 work Documentary publisher National Film Board of Canada accessdate 2009-03-23 in Kamloops


quot based

zero , with creeks east of Princeton having names like "Five Mile" based on their distance from that location. The town he founded was renamed "Prince Town" (later corrupted to "Princeton") to honor an 1860 visit to eastern Canada by Prince Edward (later King Edward VII (Edward VII of the United Kingdom)). In the years 1909–1915 the railways arrived, with the Kettle Valley Railway (later Canadian Pacific (Canadian Pacific Railway)) connecting Princeton to the Great Northern (Great Northern Railway (U.S.)). Until 1961, Princeton was home to a brewery, the Princeton Brewing Company. Until the 1940s, the brewery kept its beer cool in the Vermilion Cave. The cave, which held up to 20 railway cars at a time, was largely demolished to make way for the Hope-Princeton Highway, part of the Crowsnest Highway (British Columbia Highway 3). "Cave once used to keep beer cool held up to 20 rail cars", Princeton 2008 Visitors Guide, p. 4. Princeton joined the Canadian Board of Trade (later Chamber of Commerce) in 1913, and was incorporated as a village in 1951, and as a town in 1978. Beginning in the 1980s, Princeton began to revitalize its downtown, a plan that included red brick sidewalks and new streetlights. In the 1990s, they adopted a "heritage" theme, with many businesses converting their exteriors to match architectural styles from roughly a century earlier. Further landscaping of the town centre continues as of 2008. The historic Princeton Hotel on Bridge Street, having been in operation since 1912, burned to ground on April 8, 2006. The name Vermilion Forks survives in the name of '''Vermilion Forks Indian Reserve No. 1''', which is immediately adjacent to the town of Princeton, to the east, and is one of the reserves of the Upper Similkameen Indian Band, whose head offices are in Hedley (Hedley, British Columbia). Princeton Museum The Princeton Museum on Vermilion Avenue houses the Joe Pollard fossil collection. The collection also includes an early 1900s stagecoach, a 1934 fire engine, local native artifacts, a collection of dolls, a collection of local butterflies, exhibits about pioneer life, a livery stable, and an old firehouse. "Museum home to our history", Princeton 2008 Visitors Guide, p. 14. The Museum is affiliated with: CMA (Canadian Museums Association), CHIN (Canadian Heritage Information Network), and Virtual Museum of Canada. File:Princeton, BC - Princeton Museum 01.jpg Princeton Museum File:Princeton, BC - Princeton Museum and Okanagan Regional Library 01.jpg Princeton Museum''' File:Princeton, BC - Princeton Museum and Okanagan Regional Library 02.jpg Princeton Museum''' File:Princeton, BC - Princeton Museum shed.jpg Princeton Museum outbuilding John Fall Allison and Susan Louisa Moir Allison The '''Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen''' ('''RDOS''') is a regional district in southern British Columbia, adjacent to the U.S. (United States of America) state of Washington (Washington (U.S. state)). It is bounded by Fraser Valley Regional District to the west, Thompson-Nicola Regional District and Regional District of Central Okanagan to the north, Regional District of Kootenay Boundary to the east, and by Okanogan County, Washington to the south. As of the 2006 census (Canada 2006 Census) the population was 79,475. The district covers a land area of 10,413.44 km² (4,020.65 sq mi). The administrative offices are in the city of Penticton. Other important population centres include the district municipality of Summerland (Summerland, British Columbia), the towns of Oliver (Oliver, British Columbia), Osoyoos (Osoyoos, British Columbia), and Princeton (Princeton, British Columbia), and the village of Keremeos (Keremeos, British Columbia).


important population

of Kootenay Boundary to the east, and by Okanogan County, Washington to the south. As of the 2006 census (Canada 2006 Census) the population was 79,475. The district covers a land area of 10,413.44 km² (4,020.65 sq mi). The administrative offices are in the city of Penticton. Other important population centres include the district municipality of Summerland (Summerland, British Columbia), the towns of Oliver (Oliver, British Columbia), Osoyoos (Osoyoos, British Columbia), and Princeton (Princeton, British Columbia), and the village of Keremeos (Keremeos, British Columbia).


quot theme

The '''Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen''' ('''RDOS''') is a regional district in southern British Columbia, adjacent to the U.S. (United States of America) state of Washington (Washington (U.S. state)). It is bounded by Fraser Valley Regional District to the west, Thompson-Nicola Regional District and Regional District of Central Okanagan to the north, Regional District of Kootenay Boundary to the east, and by Okanogan County, Washington to the south. As of the 2006 census (Canada 2006 Census) the population was 79,475. The district covers a land area of 10,413.44 km² (4,020.65 sq mi). The administrative offices are in the city of Penticton. Other important population centres include the district municipality of Summerland (Summerland, British Columbia), the towns of Oliver (Oliver, British Columbia), Osoyoos (Osoyoos, British Columbia), and Princeton (Princeton, British Columbia), and the village of Keremeos (Keremeos, British Columbia).


fossil+collection

Similkameen Indian Band , whose head offices are in Hedley (Hedley, British Columbia). Princeton Museum The Princeton Museum on Vermilion Avenue houses the Joe Pollard fossil collection. The collection also includes an early 1900s stagecoach, a 1934 fire engine, local native artifacts, a collection of dolls, a collection of local butterflies, exhibits about pioneer life, a livery stable, and an old firehouse. "Museum home to our history", Princeton


education school

Category:Towns in British Columbia Category:Populated places in the Similkameen thumb Allenby's Monument in Beersheba (File:AllenbyMonument.jpg) Allenby, British Columbia, Canada, a copper mining ghost town in the Similkameen District (Similkameen Country) near the town of Princeton (Princeton, British Columbia), was named in his honour, with the nearby Allenby Lake was named after the town. BCGNIS listing "Allenby (locality)" There is a road in Aldershot, Hampshire, England named after him. Allenby Gardens (Allenby Gardens, South Australia), a suburb of Adelaide, South Australia was also named in his honour. * Prince Rupert (Prince Rupert, British Columbia) - ''Northwest Weekly'' ''Prince Rupert This Week'' * Princeton (Princeton, British Columbia) - ''Similkameen News Leader'', ''Similkameen Spotlight'' * Queen Charlotte Islands - ''Queen Charlotte Islands Observer'' The core portion of the Kettle Valley Railroad started in Hope (Hope, British Columbia), transited through Brookmere (Brookmere, British Columbia), Tulameen (Tulameen, British Columbia), Princeton (Princeton, British Columbia), Summerland (Summerland, British Columbia), Penticton, Beaverdell (Beaverdell, British Columbia) and terminated in Midway (Midway, British Columbia). An additional branch line connected to Spences Bridge, British Columbia, and Merritt, British Columbia. This portion was eventually adopted as the main portion of the railroad when the portion of the original railroad between Hope and Brookmere via the Coquihalla Valley was abandoned due to high track maintenance costs. Additional spur lines connected Copper Mountain with Princeton, Osoyoos, British Columbia, and Oliver, British Columbia with Penticton. In addition, the Columbia & Western Railway from Midway, through Grand Forks, British Columbia continuing though to Cranbrook, British Columbia was also periodically referred to as portions of the KVR as well. - CIOR (CIOR (AM)) 1400 AM Princeton (Princeton, British Columbia) Astral Media adult contemporary - - CBRG-FM (CBTK-FM) 00 93.1 FM Princeton (Princeton, British Columbia) CBC Radio One public (public broadcasting) news talk (talk radio) - - CIGV


important population

of Kootenay Boundary to the east, and by Okanogan County, Washington to the south. As of the 2006 census (Canada 2006 Census) the population was 79,475. The district covers a land area of 10,413.44 km² (4,020.65 sq mi). The administrative offices are in the city of Penticton. Other important population centres include the district municipality of Summerland (Summerland, British Columbia), the towns of Oliver (Oliver, British Columbia), Osoyoos (Osoyoos, British Columbia), and Princeton (Princeton, British Columbia), and the village of Keremeos (Keremeos, British Columbia).


182

talk (talk radio) - - CIGV-FM-2 (CIGV-FM) 00 98.1 FM Princeton (Princeton, British Columbia) Great Valleys Radio country (country music) - Princeton (Princeton, British Columbia) through Aspen Grove (Aspen Grove, British Columbia) to Kamloops (Kamloops, British Columbia). Pre-1986 Highway 5. 182 cities Greenwood (Greenwood, British Columbia), Grand Forks (Grand Forks, British Columbia), Castlegar

, British Columbia Kamloops cities Princeton (Princeton, British Columbia) Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) Kamloops (Kamloops, British Columbia) spur_type Hwy '''Highway 5A''', the ''Princeton (Princeton, British Columbia)-Kamloops (Kamloops, British Columbia) Highway'', is Highway 5 (British Columbia Highway 5)'s pre-1986 alignment south of Kamloops. Unlike the four-lane Highway 5 freeway, the 182 km (113 mi) long Highway 5A is only two lanes

Princeton, British Columbia

'''Princeton''' (originally '''Vermilion Forks''' "The rich history of Princeton or how Vermilion Forks made it on the map...", Princeton 2008 Visitors Guide, p. 4. ) is a town in the Similkameen (Similkameen Country) region of southern British Columbia, Canada.

Princeton centers on seven blocks of businesses along Bridge Street and five blocks on Vermilion Avenue; there are also businesses along British Columbia Highway 3. "Princeton... 'Beautiful B.C. at its Best'", Princeton 2008 Visitors Guide, p. 9.

Historically, the area's main industry has been mining —copper, gold, coal, and some platinum —but nowadays the town's biggest employer is a sawmill owned by Weyerhaeuser, along with a few smaller timber companies, such as Princeton Wood Preservers and Princeton Post and Rail. http: www.for.gov.bc.ca hfd library documents bib93084.pdf

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