Prague

What is Prague known for?


history+past

player at Sparta Prague in 1989, securing a professional contract two-years later with rivals Slavia Prague. Establishing himself as a senior regular, Berger competed in Europe and earned selection for Czechoslovakia and, following its establishment, the Czech


set theory

''' (21 September 1903 in Heřmanův Městec – 24 May 1995 in Prague) was a Czech (Czechs) geologist. He won the Lomonosov Prize for his contributions to geology. birth_date birth_place Prague, Czechoslovakia residence '''Petr Vopěnka''' (born May 16, 1935 in Prague) is a Czech (Czech people) mathematician. In the early seventies, he established the Alternative Set Theory (i.e. alternative


personal voice

on fundamental questions such as national sovereignty, socialist democracy, and the freedom of culture. In conversation with the neo-romantics, the next generation of authors leaned toward realism and naturalism (naturalism (literature)), the ordinary and banal. They favored contemporary subjects over historical ones, and sought to deemphasize the personal voice of the author in comparison to the often highly colored speech of the characters. Two main topics were of interest: the exploration of the Czech village and the extent to which it remained an oasis of good morals (Jan Herben, Karel Václav Rais, Alois Mrštík); and Prague, especially the life of the lower classes (Ignát Herrman, Karel Matěj Čapek Chod). thumb Autograph of Jaroslav Foglar (1983) (File:Jaroslav Foglar autograph.jpg) '''Jaroslav Foglar''' (6 July 1907 in Prague - 23 January 1999) was a famous Czech (Czech language) author who wrote many novels about youths (partly also about Boy Scouts (Junák) movement) and their adventures in nature and dark city streets. Early life Foglar was born and grew up in Prague, capital of Bohemia. Because his father died prematurely he was brought up in rather poor material conditions by his mother. He was strongly influenced by romantic parts of Prague. All of the fictional towns in his novels are more or less derived from Prague. During the 1920s, Foglar was strongly influenced by German independent Wandervogel movement as well as Scout (Scouting) movement led by Antonín Benjamin Svojsík under Czech (Czechs) name Junák. Early life Foglar was born and grew up in Prague, capital of Bohemia. Because his father died prematurely he was brought up in rather poor material conditions by his mother. He was strongly influenced by romantic parts of Prague. All of the fictional towns in his novels are more or less derived from Prague. During the 1920s, Foglar was strongly influenced by German independent Wandervogel movement as well as Scout (Scouting) movement led by Antonín Benjamin Svojsík under Czech (Czechs) name Junák. Early life Foglar was born and grew up in Prague, capital of Bohemia. Because his father died prematurely he was brought up in rather poor material conditions by his mother. He was strongly influenced by romantic parts of Prague. All of the fictional towns in his novels are more or less derived from Prague. During the 1920s, Foglar was strongly influenced by German independent Wandervogel movement as well as Scout (Scouting) movement led by Antonín Benjamin Svojsík under Czech (Czechs) name Junák. Writer and editor career, prohibited writer and the end of life During 1930s and 1940s, Foglar worked as a magazine editor in one of the largest Prague publishing houses, Melantrich. He edited several journals for youths: * ''Mladý hlasatel'' ("Young herald"), 1938–1941 In 1490 he once again went through Breslau (Wrocław) to Prague, capital of the Kingdom of Bohemia. Hartmann Schedel used Celtis' descriptions of Breslau in the ''Schedelsche Weltchronik'' (Nuremberg Chronicle). In Hungary, Celtis formed the ''Sodalitas Litterarum Hungaria'' ("Hungarian Literary Society"), later as ''Sodalitas Litterarum Danubiana'' to be based in Vienna. He made stops at Regensburg, Passau and Nuremberg (and probably Mainz). At Heidelberg he founded the ''Sodalitas Litterarum Rhenana'' ("Rhineland Literary Society"). Later he went to Lübeck and Ingolstadt. At Ingolstadt, in 1492 he delivered his famous speech to the students there, in which he called on Germans to rival Italians in learning and letters. This would later become an extremely popular address in sixteenth century German nationalistic sentiment. A first "international" competition for football clubs was founded in 1897 in Vienna. The "'''Challenge Cup'''" was invented by John Gramlick Sr., a co-founder of the Vienna Cricket and Football Club. In this cup competition all clubs of the Austro-Hungarian Empire (Austria-Hungary) that normally would not meet could take part, though actually almost only clubs from the Empire's three major cities Vienna, Budapest and Prague participated. The Challenge Cup was carried out until the year 1911 and is today seen as the predecessor to the Mitropa Cup and consequently the European Cup and Champions League (UEFA Champions League). The last winner of the cup was Vienna Sports Club, one of the oldest and most traditional football clubs of Austria where the cup still remains. Like many settlements, Marburg developed at the crossroads of two important early medieval highways: the trade route linking Cologne and Prague and the trade route from the North Sea to the Alps and on to Italy, the former crossing the river Lahn here. The settlement was protected and customs were raised by a small castle built during the 9th or 10th century by the Giso. Marburg has been a town since 1140, as proven by coins. From the Gisos, it fell around that time to the Landgraves (Graf) of Thuringia, residing on the Wartburg above Eisenach. In 1741, the Austrian authorities informed Maria Theresa that Bohemian populace would prefer Charles Albert to her as sovereign. Maria Theresa, desperate and burdened by pregnancy, wrote plaintively to her sister: "I don't know if a town will remain to me for my delivery." Browning, 65. She bitterly vowed to spare nothing and no one to defend her kingdom when she wrote to the Bohemian chancellor, Count Philip Kinsky (Philip Kinsky): "My mind is made up. We must put everything at stake to save Bohemia." Duffy, 151. She explained her resolution to the Count furthermore: "I shall have all my armies, all my Hungarians killed off before I cede so much as an inch of ground." Browning, 76. On 26 October, the Elector of Bavaria captured Prague and declared himself King of Bohemia. Maria Theresa, then in Hungary, wept on learning of the loss of Bohemia. Browning, 79. Charles Albert was unanimously elected Holy Roman Emperor on 24 January 1742. The Archduchess, who regarded the election as a catastrophe, Browning, 88. caught her enemies unprepared by insisting on a winter campaign; Browning, 92. the same day he was elected emperor, Austrian troops under Ludwig Andreas von Khevenhüller captured Munich, Charles Albert's capital. Crankshaw, 93. Dmoz:Regional Europe Czech Republic Regions Prague Commons:Category:Prague Wikipedia:Prague


excellent+illustrations

or rector of 95 universities around the world. He was a founding member of El Colegio Nacional (1943). A Yiddish translation, with excellent illustrations, was published by Michael Adam (Zürich, 1546; Prague, 1607; Amsterdam, 1661); it was later revised by Menahem ben Solomon ha-Levi, and published under the title ''Keter Torah'' (Amsterdam, 1743). Another Latin translation, with Tam ibn Yahya's preface, was published by Joseph Gagnier (Oxford, 1706


academic family

(1953). Paul A. Pisk, Review of published score of "Little Suite from the Opera ''Comedy on the Bridge''", ''Notes'' (2nd ser.), '''11(1)''', 148 (1953). '''Louis Hjelmslev''' (October 3, 1899, Copenhagen – May 30, 1965, Copenhagen) was a Danish (Denmark) linguist (linguistics) whose ideas formed the basis of the Copenhagen School (The Copenhagen school (Linguistics)) of linguistics. Born into an academic family (his


extremely beautiful

extremely beautiful and original illuminated manuscripts (gouache on paper), which are beyond doubt the most important works of the last phase of her life. The "Callimaque" manuscript (c. 1939, the text being a French translation of a hymn by Hellenistic poet Callimachus) is widely regarded as her masterpiece. In 1936 she participated in the exhibition ''Cubism and Abstract Art'' in New York and went on to have solo exhibitions in Prague and in Paris. She was a book


translating+illustrating

left Prague for Petrkov. In 1926 he married the French poet Suzanne Renaud, who he would later translate into Czech. In 1914 started his long-time and close cooperation with Josef Florian in the town of Stará Říše translating, illustrating and publishing his own poetry. In 1949 his farmstead was confiscated by the new Communist state (he and his family were allowed to live on in Petrkov), and the publishers that had heretofore published his work were closed down. He died in 1971


designing+stage

in Leipzig. In 1917–1924, he devoted most of his time to designing stage sets for various theaters—in Saint Petersburg, Odessa, Prague, Paris, and for the Royal Opera in Bucharest. In Paris, where he lived from 1923, he also worked on sets for the films Casanova and Sheherazade and continued to paint in the cubist-constructivist style (e.g., ''Composition'' (1924), ''Construction'' 1924, or ''A Person'' 1926). In the 1930s Andriienko-Nechytailo produced a series of surrealist paintings (e.g., ''A Fair Stall'' 1933). He switched to neorealism in the 1940s and painted a number of portraits as well as a series the cityscapes Disappearing Paris (such as ''Rue Carpeaux'' 1946, ''Rue Paul Barruel'' 1954, ''Rue Cambronne'' 1954, and ''Paysage du Cycle'' 1956). From 1958 he returned to constructivism and abstraction. Andriienko-Nechytailo's work is characterized by a precision of composition that harmonizes subtly with color. His stage sets are remarkable for their laconic quality and architectural schematism, and his costume designs, for their richness. His paintings can be found in the City Museum of Modern Art and the Arsenal Library in Paris, the National Library in Vienna, the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, the Metropolitan Museum in New York, the National Museum in Lviv, and Ukrainian émigré museums and private art collections. European Championships (1978 European Championships in Athletics) Prague, Czechoslovakia 4th Benda became the founder of a German school of violin playing. In his youth he was a chorister at Prague and afterward in the Chapel Royal at Dresden. At the same time he began to study the violin, and soon joined a company of strolling musicians who attended fetes, fairs, etc. At eighteen years of age Benda abandoned this wandering life and returned to Prague, going thence to Vienna, where he pursued his study of the violin under Carl Heinrich Graun, a pupil of Tartini. After two years he was appointed chapel master at Warsaw. In 1732, he entered the service of Frederick the Great, then prince royal of Prussia, with whom he remained the rest of his life. He was a member of the prince royal's band, and later became concertmaster to the king. Dmoz:Regional Europe Czech Republic Regions Prague Commons:Category:Prague Wikipedia:Prague


home+resistance

. Although small disorganised cells of Central Leadership of Home Resistance (Ústřední vedení odboje domácího, ÚVOD) (Czech resistance to Nazi occupation#Consolidation of resistance groups: ÚVOD) survived, only the communist resistance was able to function in a coordinated manner (although it also suffered arrests). The terror also served to paralyse resistance in society, with public and widespread reprisals against any action resisting the German rule.


successful work

Republic , Australia (Australia national baseball team), Chinese Taipei (Chinese Taipei national baseball team) & Mexico (Mexico national baseball team) *Group B (hosted by Spain in Barcelona): Spain (Spain national baseball team), Cuba, Puerto Rico (Puerto Rico national baseball team) & South Africa (South Africa national baseball team) Head of Hospital and president of the doctors' fraternity in Prague (1873–1877) Heine's successful work in Innsbruck induced

Prague

'''Prague''' ( It is also the historical capital of Bohemia. Situated in the north-west of the country on the Vltava River, the city is home to about 1.24 million people, while its larger urban zone (Larger Urban Zones) is estimated to have a population of nearly 2 million. title Urban Audit 2004 url http: www.urbanaudit.org DataAccessed.aspx accessdate 20 July 2008 The city has a temperate climate, with warm summers and chilly winters.

Prague has been a political, cultural, and economic centre of central Europe with waxing and waning fortunes during its 1,100-year existence. Founded during the Romanesque (romanesque architecture) and flourishing by the Gothic (Gothic art) and Renaissance eras, Prague was not only the capital of the Czech state, but also the seat of two Holy Roman Emperors and thus also the capital of the Holy Roman Empire. It was an important city to the Habsburg Monarchy and its Austro-Hungarian Empire and after World War I became the capital of Czechoslovakia. The city played major roles in the Protestant Reformation, the Thirty Years' War, and in 20th-century history, during both World Wars and the post-war Communist era.

Prague is home to a number of famous cultural attractions, many of which survived the violence and destruction of 20th-century Europe. Main attractions include the Prague Castle, the Charles Bridge, Old Town Square (Old Town Square (Prague)), the Jewish Quarter (Josefov), the Lennon Wall and Petřín hill. Since 1992, the extensive historic centre of Prague has been included in the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites.

The city boasts more than ten major museums, along with numerous theatres, galleries, cinemas, and other historical exhibits. A modern public transportation system connects the city. Also, it is home to a wide range of public and private schools, including Charles University (Charles University in Prague) (Univerzita Karlova v Praze ). Prague is classified as an "Alpha-" global city according to GaWC studies, comparable to Vienna, Seoul and Washington, D.C. Its rich history makes it a popular tourist destination, and the city receives more than 4.4 million international visitors annually,

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