Peterborough

What is Peterborough known for?


building stone

of the Peterborough district into the transfer to Cambridgeshire and when it became a unitary authority in 1998. thumb right Abbey Church of St. Mary the Virgin and St. Botolph Thorney (Image:Abbey Church of St. Mary the Virgin and St. Botolph Thorney Cambs.JPG) Barnack stone The stone, sometimes called "Barnack rag", was a valuable building stone first exploited by the Romans (Roman Britain). Quarrying continued in Medieval times (Britain in the Middle Ages) when the Abbeys


record run

it comprises North Werrington and South Werrington wards. Werrington spans an area of two and a half square miles (6 km²) and has a population of 14,800. At the end of ''Mallard'''s record run, the middle big end (part of the motion for the inside cylinder) was found to have run hot (indicated by the bursting of a heat-sensitive "stink bomb" placed in the bearing for warning purposes), the bearing metal having melted, which meant that the locomotive had to stop


largest home

within the group. In 1998 SodaStream was bought by Soda-Club, an Israeli company founded in 1991 by Peter Wiseburgh, who from 1978 to 1991 had been Israel's exclusive distributor for SodaStream, creating the world's largest home carbonation systems supplier. ref>


good interest

populations. Moneylending during this period was largely a matter of private loans advanced to persons short of cash, whether persistently in debt or temporarily until the next harvest. Mostly, it was undertaken by exceedingly rich men who were prepared to take on a high risk if the profit looked good; interest rates were fixed privately and were almost entirely unrestricted by law. Investment was always regarded as a matter of seeking personal profit, often on a large scale. Banking


short work

1945 PLACE OF BIRTH Peterborough, England DATE OF DEATH The tower is constructed of stone rubble (Rubble masonry) and rendered on the outside, and is decorated with vertical limestone pilaster strips and strapwork. At the corners of the tower, the walls are strengthened by long vertical quoin (Quoin (architecture)) stones bedded on horizontal slabs, and hence is termed ''long and short work''. The way in which the tower is decorated is unique to Anglo-Saxon

and throughout the Middle Ages to build churches and cathedrals including Peterborough and Ely (Ely, Cambridgeshire). It is evident that Anglo-Saxon churches with long and short work and pilaster strips are distributed throughout England where this type of limestone was available, and in East Anglia where the stone was transported. Image:Henry Bird All Saints Earls Barton St Andrew St Stephen.jpg thumb left 190px St Andrew and St Stephen on the rood screen painted by Henry Bird


school based

school at Kingston. Hatch 1983, p. 61. The school was originally No. 7 Service Flying School based in Peterborough, England. Its main intent was to train pilots of the Fleet Air Arm, but in the beginning the school's first students were British Commonwealth Air Training Plan (BCATP) trainees selected for service with the RCAF and RAF. Hatch 1983, p. 62. Naval trainees, however, made


local landscape

Green Wheel is a 50-mile (80 km) network of cycleways, footpaths and bridleways which provide safe, continuous routes around the city with radiating spokes connecting to the city centre. The project has also created a sculpture trail, which provides functional, landscape artworks along the Green Wheel route and a Living Landmarks project involving the local community in the creation of local landscape features such as mini woodlands, ponds and hedgerows. "Cycle Guide: The Green Wheel", ''The Guardian'', London and Manchester, 3 March 2007. Another long-distance footpath, the Hereward Way, runs from Oakham in Rutland, through Peterborough, to East Harling in Norfolk. Demographics Population Peterborough has an estimated population of WikiPedia:Peterborough Dmoz:Regional Europe United Kingdom England Cambridgeshire Peterborough Commons:Category:Peterborough


series+time

of Flag Fen, a Bronze Age archaeological site near Peterborough, and for his frequent appearances on the Channel 4 television series ''Time Team''. PRYOR, Dr Francis Manning Marlborough’, Who's Who 2012, A & C Black, 2012; online edn, Oxford University Press, Dec 2011 ; online edn, Nov 2011 accessed 13 Jan 2012 Pryor returned


frequent appearances

of Flag Fen, a Bronze Age archaeological site near Peterborough, and for his frequent appearances on the Channel 4 television series ''Time Team''. PRYOR, Dr Francis Manning Marlborough’, Who's Who 2012, A & C Black, 2012; online edn, Oxford University Press, Dec 2011 ; online edn, Nov 2011 accessed 13 Jan 2012 WikiPedia:Peterborough Dmoz:Regional Europe United Kingdom England Cambridgeshire Peterborough Commons:Category:Peterborough


croydon

other as part of the twinning venture, and artists have even come over from Alcalá de Henares to paint Catherine's tombstone. * Aragon Road in Ampthill is named after Catherine, also in Ampthill there is a statue of a cross named "Queen Catherine's Cross" in her honour. During her exile from Henrys life, Katharine lived in one of the country manors in Ampthill. The Brighton Main Line railway route (Rail transport in Great Britain) south from Croydon links the town to Sussex

, Surrey, and Kent and to central London to the north: providing direct services to Hastings, Southampton, Brighton, Portsmouth, Gatwick Airport, Bedford and Luton. The main station for all these services is East Croydon station in the centre of the town centre. East Croydon station is the largest and busiest station in Croydon, third busiest in London, excluding Travelcard Zone 1. The station at West Croydon (West Croydon station) serves all trains travelling west except the fastest

. There are also more regional stations scattered around the borough. Passenger rail services through Croydon are provided by Southern (Southern (train operating company)) and First Capital Connect.

Peterborough

'''Peterborough''' ( to the north-east. The railway station is an important stop on the East Coast Main Line between London and Edinburgh. The unitary authority borders Northamptonshire and Rutland to the west, Lincolnshire to the north, and non-metropolitan Cambridgeshire to the south and east.

The local topography is flat and low-lying, and in some places lies below sea level, for example in the Fens that lie to the east of Peterborough. Human settlement in the area began before the Bronze Age, as can be seen at the Flag Fen archaeological site to the east of the current city centre also with evidence of Roman (Ancient Rome) occupation. The Anglo-Saxon (History of Anglo-Saxon England) period saw the establishment of a monastery, Medeshamstede, which later became Peterborough Cathedral. Peterborough was until 1965 part of Northamptonshire, although the city with its surrounding rural area was from medieval times administered separately as the Soke of Peterborough.

The population grew rapidly following the arrival of the railways in the 19th century, and Peterborough became an industrial centre, particularly noted for its brick manufacture. Following the Second World War (World War II), growth was limited until designation as a New Town (New towns in the United Kingdom) in the 1960s. Housing and population are expanding and a £1 billion regeneration of the city centre and immediately surrounding area is underway. In common with much of the United Kingdom, industrial employment has fallen, with a significant proportion of new jobs in financial services and distribution.

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