Petén Department

What is Petén Department known for?


648

founded by an offshoot of the dynasty of the great city of Tikal in AD 629 in order to control trade routes (Trade in Maya civilization) in the Petexbatún region, particularly the Pasión River. Salisbury, Koumenalis & Barbara Moffett 2002. In AD 648 Dos Pilas broke away from Tikal and became a vassal state of Calakmul, although the first two kings of Dos Pilas continued to use the same Maya


reporting

experiencing severe deforestation in its southern half. Deforestation has been particularly rapid near Laguna del Tigre National Park in western Petén. To combat deforestation, Guatemalan president Álvaro Colom proposed dramatically expanding ecotourism around

Category:Petén


quot short

de la Destrucción de las Indias '' ("Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies") was first published in 1552 in Seville. de Las Casas 1552, 1997, p. 13. History and geography The municipality ''(municipio (Municipalities of Mexico))'' of Calakmul borders to the east with Quintana Roo (municipalities of José María Morelos (José María Morelos, Quintana Roo), Bacalar (Bacalar Municipality), and Othón P. Blanco (Othón P. Blanco, Quintana Roo)) and Belize (Orange Walk District); to the south with Guatemala (Petén Department); and to the north and west with other municipalities in Campeche (Candelaria (Candelaria Municipality), Champotón (Champotón Municipality), Escárcega (Escárcega Municipality) and Hopelchén (Hopelchén Municipality)). It covers 13,839.11 km² (5,343.31 sq mi), accounting for 24.34% of the state's total surface area, and is the 10th-largest municipality in area in the country.


social history

*On 27 April 1977, Convair 240 TG-ACA crashed (1977 Aviateca Convair 240 crash) near Guatemala City, Guatemala, killing all 28 people on board. thumb left A page from the '' Lienzo de Tlaxcala (File:LienzodeTlaxcalaLamina5.jpg)'', showing a Spanish conquistador accompanied by Tlaxcalan allies and a native porter alt Painting with three prominent indigenous warriors in single file facing left, wearing cloaks and grasping staves, followed by a dog. Below them and to the right is the smaller image of a mounted Spaniard with a raised lance. To the left and indigenous porter carries a pack fixed by a strap across his forehead, and sports a staff in one hand. All are apparently moving towards a doorway at top left. The sources describing the Spanish conquest of Guatemala include those written by the Spanish themselves, among them two of four letters written by conquistador Pedro de Alvarado to Hernán Cortés in 1524, describing the initial campaign to subjugate the Guatemalan Highlands. These letters were despatched to Tenochtitlan, addressed to Cortés but with a royal audience in mind; two of these letters are now lost. Restall and Asselbergs 2007, p. 23. Gonzalo de Alvarado y Chávez (Gonzalo de Alvarado#Gonzalo de Alvarado y Chávez) was Pedro de Alvarado's cousin; he accompanied him on his first campaign in Guatemala and in 1525 he became the chief constable of Santiago de los Caballeros de Guatemala, the newly founded Spanish capital. Gonzalo wrote an account that mostly supports that of Pedro de Alvarado. Pedro de Alvarado's brother Jorge wrote another account to the king of Spain that explained it was his own campaign of 1527–1529 that established the Spanish colony. Restall and Asselbergs 2007, p. 49. Bernal Díaz del Castillo wrote a lengthy account of the conquest of Mexico and neighbouring regions, the ''Historia verdadera de la conquista de la Nueva España'' ("True History of the Conquest of New Spain"); his account of the conquest of Guatemala generally agrees with that of the Alvarados. Restall and Asselbergs 2007, pp. 49–50. His account was finished around 1568, some 40 years after the campaigns it describes. Díaz del Castillo 1632, 2005, p. 5. Hernán Cortés described his expedition to Honduras in the fifth letter of his ''Cartas de Relación'', Cortés 1844, 2005, p. xxi. in which he details his crossing of what is now Guatemala's Petén Department. Dominican (Dominican Order) friar Bartolomé de las Casas wrote a highly critical account of the Spanish conquest of the Americas and included accounts of some incidents in Guatemala. Restall and Asselbergs 2007, p. 50. The ''Brevísima Relación de la Destrucción de las Indias (A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies)'' ("Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies") was first published in 1552 in Seville. de Las Casas 1552, 1997, p. 13. History and geography The municipality ''(municipio (Municipalities of Mexico))'' of Calakmul borders to the east with Quintana Roo (municipalities of José María Morelos (José María Morelos, Quintana Roo), Bacalar (Bacalar Municipality), and Othón P. Blanco (Othón P. Blanco, Quintana Roo)) and Belize (Orange Walk District); to the south with Guatemala (Petén Department); and to the north and west with other municipalities in Campeche (Candelaria (Candelaria Municipality), Champotón (Champotón Municipality), Escárcega (Escárcega Municipality) and Hopelchén (Hopelchén Municipality)). It covers 13,839.11 km² (5,343.31 sq mi), accounting for 24.34% of the state's total surface area, and is the 10th-largest municipality in area in the country.


century including

was published in Germany in 1853. Several other expeditions came to further investigate, map, and photograph Tikal in the 19th century (including Alfred P. Maudslay in 1881-82) and the early 20th century. Pioneering archaeologists started to clear, map and record the ruins in the 1880s. right thumb Archaeologist Edwin M. Shook (File:EdShookCropped.jpg), field director of the Tikal Project; Shook was also instrumental in having Tikal established


series international

: www.prensalibre.com pl especial mapas 12.pdf title Petén:Zona arqueológica por excelencia publisher Prensa Libre accessdate 2010-01-20 language es : :


population history

Department Category:Departments of Guatemala thumb left Tikal Parque Nacional Tikal (File:Tikal Giaguaro.jpg) in Peten (Petén Department), Guatemala. right thumb Archaeological site of Chichén-Itzá (File:Chichen-Itza El Castillo.jpg) in Yucatán, Mexico. One of the New Seven Wonders of the World. Many of the world's rainforests are associated


savannah

mi north-south. Sharer and Traxler 2006, pp. 46–47. The largest lake is Lake Petén Itza, near the centre of the drainage basin; it measures above mean

sea level with karstic ridges reaching an average altitude of . The savannah is surrounded by hills with unusually steep southern slopes and gentler northern approaches; the hills are covered with dense tropical forest. To the north of the lakes region ''bajos'' become more frequent, interspersed with forest. In the far north of the Petén the Mirador Basin forms another interior drainage region. Sharer and Traxler 2006, p. 47


reporting+title

experiencing severe deforestation in its southern half. Deforestation has been particularly rapid near Laguna del Tigre National Park in western Petén. To combat deforestation, Guatemalan president Álvaro Colom proposed dramatically expanding ecotourism around


highly critical

in the fifth letter of his ''Cartas de Relación'', Cortés 1844, 2005, p. xxi. in which he details his crossing of what is now Guatemala's Petén Department. Dominican (Dominican Order) friar Bartolomé de las Casas wrote a highly critical account of the Spanish conquest of the Americas and included accounts of some incidents in Guatemala. Restall and Asselbergs 2007, p. 50. The ''Brevísima Relación de la Destrucción de las Indias (A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies)'' ("Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies") was first published in 1552 in Seville. de Las Casas 1552, 1997, p. 13. History and geography The municipality ''(municipio (Municipalities of Mexico))'' of Calakmul borders to the east with Quintana Roo (municipalities of José María Morelos (José María Morelos, Quintana Roo), Bacalar (Bacalar Municipality), and Othón P. Blanco (Othón P. Blanco, Quintana Roo)) and Belize (Orange Walk District); to the south with Guatemala (Petén Department); and to the north and west with other municipalities in Campeche (Candelaria (Candelaria Municipality), Champotón (Champotón Municipality), Escárcega (Escárcega Municipality) and Hopelchén (Hopelchén Municipality)). It covers 13,839.11 km² (5,343.31 sq mi), accounting for 24.34% of the state's total surface area, and is the 10th-largest municipality in area in the country.

Petén Department

'''Petén''' is a department (Departments of Guatemala) of the nation of Guatemala. It is geographically the northernmost department of Guatemala, as well as the largest in size — at it accounts for about one third of Guatemala's area. The capital is Flores (Flores, Guatemala). The population in 2005 was estimated at 450,000.

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