Ostrogothic Kingdom

What is Ostrogothic Kingdom known for?


tradition lively

;Haldon (1997), pp. 195–207 All these mosaics are executed in the Hellenistic-Roman tradition: lively and imaginative, with rich colors and a certain perspective, and with a vivid depiction of the landscape, plants and birds. They were finished when Ravenna was still under Gothic (Ostrogothic Kingdom) rule. The apse is flanked by two chapels, the ''prothesis'' and the ''diaconicon'', typical for Byzantine architecture. Image:DomusAurea.jpg thumb The southwestern exedra


founding important

was overthrown by Charlemagne, who was crowned Emperor of the Romans (Holy Roman Emperor) in 800 CE. In the 8th century, North Germanic (North Germanic tribes) seamen (Vikings) launched a massive expansion (Viking expansion), founding important states in Eastern Europe (Kievan Rus') and France (Duchy of Normandy), while colonizing the Atlantic as far as North America (Norse colonization of the Americas). Subsequently, Germanic languages became dominant along many European


gibbon

proposes that Empress Theodora (Theodora (6th century)) might have had a hand in the affair, wishing to get rid of a potential rival. Although generally dismissed by historians such as Gibbon and Charles Diehl, Bury (Ch. XVIII, pp. 165-167) considers that the story is corroborated by circumstantial evidence. References Sources Primary sources * Procopius, ''De Bello Gothico'', Volumes I-IV * Jordanes, ''

~vandersp Courses texts jordgeti.html De origine actibusque Getarum ("The Origin and Deeds of the Goths") '', translated by Charles C. Mierow. * Cassiodorus, ''Chronica'' * Cassiodorus, ''Varia epistolae ("Letters")'', at the Project Gutenberg * Anonymus Valesianus, ''Excerpta, Pars II Secondary sources * Edward Gibbon, ''History


554

Battles of Isonzo and Verona date_pre 489 event1 Start of Gothic War (Gothic War (535–554)) date_event1 535 p1 Kingdom of Odoacer s1 Byzantium under the Justinian dynasty flag_s1 Simple Labarum.svg image_map Ostrogothic Kingdom.png image_map_caption The Ostrogothic Kingdom at its greatest extent. capital Ravenna (from 493 to 540) latd 44 latm 25 latNS N longd 12 longm 12 longEW E common_languages Latin

. Only by renouncing his throne in the Empire's favour could Theodahad hope to avert war. The Gothic War and end of the Ostrogothic Kingdom (535–554) The '''Gothic War''' between the Eastern Roman Empire and the Ostrogothic Kingdom was fought from 535 until 554 in Italy, Dalmatia (Dalmatia (theme)), Sardinia, Sicily and Corsica. It is commonly divided into two phases. The first phase lasted from 535 to 540 and ended with the fall

of Ravenna and the apparent reconquest of Italy by the Byzantines. During the second phase (540 541–553), Goths' resistance was reinvigorated under Totila and put down only after a long struggle by Narses, who also repelled the 554 invasion by the Franks and Alamanni. In the same year, Justinian promulgated the Pragmatic Sanction which prescribed Italy's new government. Several cities in northern Italy continued to hold out, however, until the early 560s. The war had its roots


cultural architecture

of the Ostrogothic Kingdom *Theoderic the Great (''Thiudoric'') 489-526 *Athalaric (''Atthalaric'') 526-534 *Theodahad (''Thiudahad'') 534-536 *Witiges (''Wittigeis'') 536-540 *Ildibad (''Hildibad'') 540-541 *Eraric the Rugian (Eraric) (''Heraric'', ''Ariaric'') 541 *Totila (''Baduila'') 541-552 *Teia (''Theia'', ''Teja'') 552-553 Cultural Architecture File:Palazzo.jpg thumb 300px The Palace of Theoderic


550

(981) and afterwards to the marquesses Del Vasto (1084); region mare nostrum (Mediterranean) states Roman Empire, Ostrogothic Kingdom, Gallic Empire, Palmyrene Empire nation Western Roman Empire *The Gupta Empire from the late AD 5th century until its dissolution c. 550. *The Ostrogothic Kingdom from AD 535 until its conquest by the Eastern Roman Empire in 540. *The Eastern Roman Empire from the Slavic

) **Theudebert I, King of Rheims (List of Frankish Kings) (534–548) *'''Ostrogothic Kingdom''' - Vitiges (536–540) *'''Visigothic Kingdom''' - Theudis (531–548) **Theudebert I, King of Rheims (List of Frankish Kings) (534–548) *'''Ostrogothic Kingdom''' - Vitiges (536–540) *'''Visigothic Kingdom''' - Theudis (531–548) *'''Suebic Kingdom of Galicia''' - Teodemundo (469–550

) *'''Ostrogothic Kingdom''' - Totila (541–552) *'''Visigothic Kingdom''' - Theudis (531–548) *'''Suebic Kingdom of Galicia''' - Teodemundo (469–550) *'''Ostrogothic Kingdom''' - Totila (541–552) *'''Visigothic Kingdom''' - Theudis (531–548) *'''Suebic Kingdom of Galicia''' - Teodemundo (469–550) *'''Ostrogothic Kingdom''' - Totila (541–552) *'''Visigothic Kingdom''' - Theudis


774

were established in Italy (Ostrogothic Kingdom), while the Vandal (Vandals) leader Gaiseric had sacked Rome (Sack of Rome (455)) and founded a kingdom in Africa. In 507, the Visigoths were expelled (Battle of Vouillé) by the Franks from most of their Gallic possessions, and thereafter ruled a state (Visigothic Kingdom) in Hispania. In 568, the Lombard (Lombards) leader Alboin invaded Italy, and founded an independent kingdom (Lombard Kingdom) which in 774

reached its zenith under the eighth-century ruler Liutprand (Liutprand, King of the Lombards). In 774, the Kingdom was conquered by the Frankish (Franks) King Charlemagne, and integrated into his Empire (Francia). However, Lombard nobles continued to rule parts of the Italian peninsula well into the 11th century, when they were conquered (Norman conquest of southern Italy) by the Normans, and added to their Kingdom of Sicily. Their legacy is apparent in the regional

of Tyrol, only its southern part. The northern part of Tyrol came under the influence of the Bavarii, while the west probably was part of Alamannia. Thus, Tyrol was divided among three spheres of influence that met in the approximate area of today's Bolzano. During the 6th century Bavaria and Alamannia became stem duchies (Stem duchy) of the Frankish Kingdom (Francia). On conquering the Lombard Kingdom of Italy in 774, Charlemagne had himself crowned King of the Lombards


568

in the ambition of Roman Emperor Justinian (Justinian I) to recover the provinces of the former Western Roman Empire, which had been lost to invading barbarian tribes in the previous century (the Migration Period). By the end of the conflict Italy was devastated and considerably depopulated. As a consequence, the victorious Byzantines found themselves unable to resist the invasion of the Lombards in 568, which resulted in the loss of large parts of the Italian peninsula. Rulers

were established in Italy (Ostrogothic Kingdom), while the Vandal (Vandals) leader Gaiseric had sacked Rome (Sack of Rome (455)) and founded a kingdom in Africa. In 507, the Visigoths were expelled (Battle of Vouillé) by the Franks from most of their Gallic possessions, and thereafter ruled a state (Visigothic Kingdom) in Hispania. In 568, the Lombard (Lombards) leader Alboin invaded Italy, and founded an independent kingdom (Lombard Kingdom) which in 774

by the end of the 5th century. However, control of the area proved a significant task, and Lombards were given increasing control of Pannonia in the 6th century, which ended in their withdrawal in 568 and arrival of Eurasian Avars and Slavs who established control of Pannonia by year 582.


476

from 493 to 553. In Italy the Ostrogoths, led by Theoderic the Great, killed and replaced Odoacer, a Germanic soldier, erstwhile-leader of the ''foederati'' in northern Italy, and the ''de facto'' ruler of Italy, who had deposed the last emperor of the Western Roman Empire, Romulus Augustulus, in 476. Under Theoderic, its first king, the Ostrogothic kingdom reached its zenith, stretching from modern France in the west into modern Serbia in the southeast. Most of the social

troublesome neighbor of the Empire - the Italian kingdom of Odoacer. Odoacer's kingdom (476–493) In 476, Odoacer, a Germanic ''magister militum'', deposed the Western Emperor Romulus Augustulus and declared himself ''rex Italiae'' ("King of Italy"), while still nominally remaining under Imperial '''suzerainty''' This fact was recognized by Zeno in 477, when he appointed Odoacer to the rank of Patrician (ancient Rome

appellation, Lombardy. Monaco remained under Roman control until the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in 476. The city was then under the domain of Odoacer until his fall at the hands of the Ostrogoths (Ostrogothic Kingdom) in the late 5th century. Monaco was recaptured by the Romans during the reign of Justinian in the mid 6th century and was held until its capture by the Lombards in the 7th century. Monaco then passed hands between the Lombards and Franks. Though


monumental buildings'

, as depicted on the walls of St. Apollinare Nuovo. The figures between the columns, representing Theoderic and his court, were removed after the East Roman conquest. Because of the kingdom's short history, no fusion of the two peoples and their art was achieved. However, under the patronage of Theoderic and Amalasuntha, large-scale restoration of ancient Roman buildings was undertaken, and the tradition of Roman civic architecture continued. In Ravenna, new churches and monumental buildings were

Ostrogothic Kingdom

The '''Ostrogothic Kingdom''' was established by the Ostrogoths in Italy (Italian peninsula) and neighbouring areas from 493 to 553.

In Italy the Ostrogoths, led by Theoderic the Great, killed and replaced Odoacer, a Germanic soldier, erstwhile-leader of the ''foederati'' in northern Italy, and the ''de facto'' ruler of Italy, who had deposed the last emperor of the Western Roman Empire, Romulus Augustulus, in 476. Under Theoderic, its first king, the Ostrogothic kingdom reached its zenith, stretching from modern France in the west into modern Serbia in the southeast. Most of the social institutions of the late Western Roman Empire were preserved during his rule.

Starting in 535, the Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire (Eastern Roman Empire) invaded Italy under Justinian I. The Ostrogothic ruler at that time, Witiges, could not defend successfully and was finally captured when the capital Ravenna fell. The Ostrogoths rallied around a new leader, Totila, and largely managed to reverse the conquest, but were eventually defeated. The last king of the Ostrogothic Kingdom was Teia.

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