Ostrogothic Kingdom

What is Ostrogothic Kingdom known for?


476

from 493 to 553. In Italy the Ostrogoths, led by Theoderic the Great, killed and replaced Odoacer, a Germanic soldier, erstwhile-leader of the ''foederati'' in northern Italy, and the ''de facto'' ruler of Italy, who had deposed the last emperor of the Western Roman Empire, Romulus Augustulus, in 476. Under Theoderic, its first king, the Ostrogothic kingdom reached its zenith, stretching from modern France in the west into modern Serbia in the southeast. Most of the social

troublesome neighbor of the Empire - the Italian kingdom of Odoacer. Odoacer's kingdom (476–493) In 476, Odoacer, a Germanic ''magister militum'', deposed the Western Emperor Romulus Augustulus and declared himself ''rex Italiae'' ("King of Italy"), while still nominally remaining under Imperial '''suzerainty''' This fact was recognized by Zeno in 477, when he appointed Odoacer to the rank of Patrician (ancient Rome

appellation, Lombardy. Monaco remained under Roman control until the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in 476. The city was then under the domain of Odoacer until his fall at the hands of the Ostrogoths (Ostrogothic Kingdom) in the late 5th century. Monaco was recaptured by the Romans during the reign of Justinian in the mid 6th century and was held until its capture by the Lombards in the 7th century. Monaco then passed hands between the Lombards and Franks. Though


536

of the Ostrogothic Kingdom *Theoderic the Great (''Thiudoric'') 489-526 *Athalaric (''Atthalaric'') 526-534 *Theodahad (''Thiudahad'') 534-536 *Witiges (''Wittigeis'') 536-540 *Ildibad (''Hildibad'') 540-541 *Eraric the Rugian (Eraric) (''Heraric'', ''Ariaric'') 541 *Totila (''Baduila'') 541-552 *Teia (''Theia'', ''Teja'') 552-553 Cultural Architecture File:Palazzo.jpg thumb 300px The Palace of Theoderic

Germanic tribes Germanic people , and incorporated into the Ostrogothic Kingdom. However, Belisarius of the Byzantine Empire recaptured Naples in 536, after entering the city via

''' - Theodoric the Great, (488–526) *'''Visigothic Kingdom''' - **Theudebert I, King of Rheims (List of Frankish Kings) (534–548) *'''Ostrogothic Kingdom''' - Theodahad (534–536) *'''Visigothic Kingdom''' - Theudis (531–548) **Theudebert I, King of Rheims (List of Frankish Kings) (534–548) *'''Ostrogothic Kingdom''' - Vitiges (536–540) *'''Visigothic Kingdom''' - Theudis (531–548


successful

)#Late Roman and Byzantine periods patrician . Odoacer retained the Roman administrative system, cooperated actively with the Roman Senate, and his rule was efficient and successful. He evicted the Vandals from Sicily in 477, and in 480 he conquered Dalmatia (Dalmatia (Roman province)) after the murder of Julius Nepos. "At this time, Odovacar overcame and killed Odiva in Dalmatia", Cassiodorus, ''Chronica'' 1309, s.a.481 Bury (1923

to the Visigothic king Alaric II and the Burgundian prince Sigismund (Sigismund of Burgundy), Jordanes, ''Getica'', 297 his sister Amalfrida married the Vandal king Thrasamund, Jordanes, ''Getica'', 299 while he himself married Audofleda, sister of the Frankish king Clovis I. Bury (1923), Ch. XIII, pp. 461-462 These policies were not always successful in maintaining peace: Theoderic found himself at war with Clovis when

the latter attacked the Visigoth dominions in Gaul in 506. The Franks were rapidly successful, killing Alaric in the Battle of Vouillé and subduing Aquitania by 507. However, starting in 508, Theoderic's generals campaigned in Gaul, and were successful in saving Septimania for the Visigoths, as well as extending Ostrogothic rule into southern Gaul (Provence) at the expense of the Burgundians. There in 510 Theoderic reestablished the defunct praetorian prefecture of Gaul. Now


previous century

in the ambition of Roman Emperor Justinian (Justinian I) to recover the provinces of the former Western Roman Empire, which had been lost to invading barbarian tribes in the previous century (the Migration Period). By the end of the conflict Italy was devastated and considerably depopulated. As a consequence, the victorious Byzantines found themselves unable to resist the invasion of the Lombards in 568, which resulted in the loss of large parts of the Italian peninsula. Rulers


508

the latter attacked the Visigoth dominions in Gaul in 506. The Franks were rapidly successful, killing Alaric in the Battle of Vouillé and subduing Aquitania by 507. However, starting in 508, Theoderic's generals campaigned in Gaul, and were successful in saving Septimania for the Visigoths, as well as extending Ostrogothic rule into southern Gaul (Provence) at the expense of the Burgundians. There in 510 Theoderic reestablished the defunct praetorian prefecture of Gaul. Now

by Anastasius in 508, which ravaged the coasts of Apulia. Bury (1923), Ch. XIII, p. 464 With the ascension of Justin I in 518, a more harmonious relationship seemed to be restored. Eutharic, Theoderic's son-in-law and designated successor, was appointed consul (Roman consul) for the year 519, while in 522, to celebrate the healing of the Acacian schism, Justin allowed both consuls to be appointed by Theoderic. Bury (1923), Ch. XVIII, pp. 152-153<

Vandals, Ostrogoths (Ostrogothic Kingdom), the Caliphate and Saracen pirates, Slavs, Bulgarians, Rus' (Rus' (people)), Normans, Genoa (Republic of Genoa), Venice (Republic of Venice), Pisa (Republic of Pisa), Crusader states, Seljuks (Sultanate of Rûm), Anatolian beyliks, Ottomans (Ottoman Navy) Sixth century – Justinian restores Roman control over the Mediterranean The 6th century marked the rebirth of Roman naval power. In 508


422

), Ch. XII, pp. 406-412 Conquest of Italy by the Goths (488–493) An agreement was reached between Zeno and Theoderic, stipulating that Theoderic, if victorious, was to rule in Italy as the emperor's representative. Bury (1923), Ch. XII, p. 422 Theoderic with his people set out from Moesia in the autumn of 488, passed through Dalmatia and crossed the Julian Alps into Italy in late August 489. The first confrontation with the army of Odoacer was at the river

Isonzo (the battle of Isonzo (Battle of Isonzo (489))) on August 28. Odoacer was defeated and withdrew towards Verona, where a month later another battle was fought, resulting in a bloody, but crushing, Gothic victory. Bury (1923), Ch. XII, pp. 422-424 Odoacer fled to his capital at Ravenna, while the larger part of his army under Tufa surrendered to the Goths. Theoderic then sent Tufa and his men against Odoacer, but he changed his allegiance again and returned

to Odoacer. In 490, Odoacer was thus able to campaign against Theoderic, take Milan and Cremona and besiege the main Gothic base at Ticinum (Pavia). At that point, however, the Visigoths intervened, the siege of Ticinum was lifted, and Odoacer was decisively defeated at the river Adda (Adda River) on 11 August 490. Odoacer fled again to Ravenna, while the Senate and many Italian cities declared themselves for Theoderic. Bury (1923), Ch. XII, pp. 422-424 ref>


monumental buildings'))

, as depicted on the walls of St. Apollinare Nuovo. The figures between the columns, representing Theoderic and his court, were removed after the East Roman conquest. Because of the kingdom's short history, no fusion of the two peoples and their art was achieved. However, under the patronage of Theoderic and Amalasuntha, large-scale restoration of ancient Roman buildings was undertaken, and the tradition of Roman civic architecture continued. In Ravenna, new churches and monumental buildings were


gibbon

proposes that Empress Theodora (Theodora (6th century)) might have had a hand in the affair, wishing to get rid of a potential rival. Although generally dismissed by historians such as Gibbon and Charles Diehl, Bury (Ch. XVIII, pp. 165-167) considers that the story is corroborated by circumstantial evidence. References Sources Primary sources * Procopius, ''De Bello Gothico'', Volumes I-IV * Jordanes, ''

~vandersp Courses texts jordgeti.html De origine actibusque Getarum ("The Origin and Deeds of the Goths") '', translated by Charles C. Mierow. * Cassiodorus, ''Chronica'' * Cassiodorus, ''Varia epistolae ("Letters")'', at the Project Gutenberg * Anonymus Valesianus, ''Excerpta, Pars II Secondary sources * Edward Gibbon, ''History


title people

of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire'' Vol. IV, Chapters 41 & 43 * *


historical tradition

expressed in the writings of the period. In his ''Chronica'', used later by Jordanes in his ''Getica'', as well as in the various panegyrics written by him and other prominent Romans of the time for the Gothic kings, Roman literary and historical tradition is put in the service of their Gothic overlords. His privileged position enabled him to compile the ''Variae Epistolae'', a collection of state correspondence, which gives great insight into the inner workings of the Gothic state. Boethius

Ostrogothic Kingdom

The '''Ostrogothic Kingdom''' was established by the Ostrogoths in Italy (Italian peninsula) and neighbouring areas from 493 to 553.

In Italy the Ostrogoths, led by Theoderic the Great, killed and replaced Odoacer, a Germanic soldier, erstwhile-leader of the ''foederati'' in northern Italy, and the ''de facto'' ruler of Italy, who had deposed the last emperor of the Western Roman Empire, Romulus Augustulus, in 476. Under Theoderic, its first king, the Ostrogothic kingdom reached its zenith, stretching from modern France in the west into modern Serbia in the southeast. Most of the social institutions of the late Western Roman Empire were preserved during his rule.

Starting in 535, the Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire (Eastern Roman Empire) invaded Italy under Justinian I. The Ostrogothic ruler at that time, Witiges, could not defend successfully and was finally captured when the capital Ravenna fell. The Ostrogoths rallied around a new leader, Totila, and largely managed to reverse the conquest, but were eventually defeated. The last king of the Ostrogothic Kingdom was Teia.

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