Ordnance Survey

What is Ordnance Survey known for?


science+field

William Roy of the Royal Engineers, which was used for a new survey of the distance between Greenwich, London and Paris. This work provided the basis for the subsequent Ordnance Survey of the counties of Britain. For his part with Roy in this work he received the Copley Medal in 1795. He died five years later at Brighton, England. *In computer science, a field name identifies a field (field (computer science)) in a database record or other data structure. *In the United Kingdom, each field (field (agriculture)) has or had a field name often seen on old parish maps, tithe maps and early and pre Ordnance Survey maps. * A field name can also mean the geographic designation for a piece of land (Toponymy) History of color printing Woodblock printing on textiles preceded printing on paper in both Asia and Europe, and the use of different blocks to produce patterns in color was common. The earliest way of adding color to items printed on paper was by hand-coloring , and this was widely used for printed images in both Europe and Asia. Chinese woodcuts have this from at least the 13th century, and European ones from very shortly after their introduction in the 15th century, where it continued to be practiced, sometimes at a very skilled level, until the 19th century—elements of the official British Ordnance Survey maps were hand-colored by boys until 1875. Early European printed books often left spaces for initials, rubrics and other elements to be added by hand, just as they had been in manuscripts, and a few early printed books had elaborate borders and miniatures (miniature (illuminated manuscript)) added. However this became much rarer after about 1500. '''Place''' align right '''Ordnance Survey''' '''grid reference (British national grid reference system)''' - I propose usage primarily in Ordnance Survey, or another page to illustrate aspects of the maps rather than each individual town or city. Dunc_Harris (User:Duncharris) ☺ (User talk:duncharris) 23:12, 9 Sep 2004 (UTC) Culloden village was originally made up of estate houses attached to Culloden House. Ordnance Survey grid reference (British national grid reference system) for Culloden House: The Nine Standards offer a better viewpoint than the Ordnance Survey trig point that marks the actual summit of the fell. Cross Fell and Great Dun Fell can be seen to the north west and Wild Boar Fell and the Howgills (Howgill Fells) feature in the south west. The High Street Range (High Street (Lake District)) of the eastern Lake District can be seen further to the west. Great Shunner Fell, crossed by the Pennine Way, and Rogan's Seat lie to the south east. Etymology Enfield Wash was first recorded in 1675 and on the Ordnance Survey map of 1822, from Old English ''(ga)wæsc'' 'a place that floods': there was probably a ford (Ford (crossing)) here where Ermine Street crosses Turkey Brook. Mills. A. D. ''Oxford Dictionary of London Place Names'' (2001) pp3,77 ISBN 0198609574 Etymology Enfield Highway is marked thus on the Ordnance Survey map of 1822, it is a settlement mainly from the eighteenth century named from the '' kings highe way leading to London'' 1610, the highway being the Roman road Ermine Street (now the A1010 (A1010 road) Hertford Road). Mills. A. D. ''Oxford Dictionary of London Place Names'' (2001) page 76 ISBN 0198609574 Retrieved 21 October 2008 The mapping authority for the United Kingdom, the Ordnance Survey, records the coastline of the main island, Great Britain, as 11,072.76 miles rounding to 11,073 miles (17,820 km). If the larger islands are added the coastline, as measured by the standard method at Mean High Water Mark, rises to about 19,491 miles (31,368 km).


products business

range Ordnance Survey produces a large variety of paper maps and digital mapping products. Business mapping Ordnance Survey produces a wide variety of different products aimed at business users, such as utility companies and local authorities. The data is supplied by Ordnance Survey on optical media or increasingly, via the Internet. Products can be downloaded via FTP or accessed 'on demand' via a web browser. Organisations using Ordnance Survey data have to purchase a licence to do

million TOIDs had been assigned, and the database stood at 600 gigabytes in size. Public sector mapping agreements Business and government. Ordnance Survey. Retrieved on 2014-04-12. Currently (March 2011), OS claims 450 million TOIDs. OS MasterMap products Business


leadership set

the Ordnance Survey photo-enlarged (Enlarger) many 1:2500 sheets covering built-up areas to 1:1250 (50.688 inches to the mile) for Land Valuation and Inland Revenue purposes. About a quarter of these 1:1250s were marked "Partially revised 1912 13". In areas where there were no further 1:2500s, these partially revised "fifty inch" sheets represent the last large-scale revision (larger than six-inch) of the County Series. The County Series mapping was superseded by the Ordnance Survey National Grid 1:1250s, 1:2500s and 1:10,560s after the Second World War. From the late 19th century to the early 1940s, the OS produced many "restricted" versions of the County Series maps and other War Department sheets for War Office purposes, in a variety of large scales that included details of military significance such as dockyards, naval installations, fortifications and military camps. Apart from a brief period during the disarmament


work business

original survey methods were largely manual, the current surveying task is simplified by the use of GPS (Global Positioning System) technology, allowing the most precise surveying standards yet. Ordnance Survey is responsible

team performs a key role in the organisation, as the authority for cartographic design and development, and engages with internal and external audiences to promote and communicate the value of cartography. They work on a broad range of projects and are responsible for styling all new products and services.


military knowledge

in charge, but Hall sent him off to Ireland so that he was again passed over when Hall left in 1854 in favour of Major Henry James (Henry James (British Army officer)). Hall was enthusiastic about extending the survey of the north of England to a scale of 1:2,500. In 1855, the Board of Ordnance was abolished and the Ordnance Survey was placed under the War Office together with the Topographical Survey and the Depot of Military Knowledge. Eventually in 1870 it was transferred to the Office of Works. The primary triangulation of the United Kingdom of Roy, Mudge and Yolland was completed by 1841, but was greatly improved by Alexander Ross Clarke who completed a new survey based on Airy (George Biddell Airy)'s spheroid in 1858, completing the Principal Triangulation (Principal Triangulation of Great Britain). The Nine Standards offer a better viewpoint than the Ordnance Survey trig point that marks the actual summit of the fell. Cross Fell and Great Dun Fell can be seen to the north west and Wild Boar Fell and the Howgills (Howgill Fells) feature in the south west. The High Street Range (High Street (Lake District)) of the eastern Lake District can be seen further to the west. Great Shunner Fell, crossed by the Pennine Way, and Rogan's Seat lie to the south east. Etymology Enfield Wash was first recorded in 1675 and on the Ordnance Survey map of 1822, from Old English ''(ga)wæsc'' 'a place that floods': there was probably a ford (Ford (crossing)) here where Ermine Street crosses Turkey Brook. Mills. A. D. ''Oxford Dictionary of London Place Names'' (2001) pp3,77 ISBN 0198609574 Etymology Enfield Highway is marked thus on the Ordnance Survey map of 1822, it is a settlement mainly from the eighteenth century named from the '' kings highe way leading to London'' 1610, the highway being the Roman road Ermine Street (now the A1010 (A1010 road) Hertford Road). Mills. A. D. ''Oxford Dictionary of London Place Names'' (2001) page 76 ISBN 0198609574 Retrieved 21 October 2008 The mapping authority for the United Kingdom, the Ordnance Survey, records the coastline of the main island, Great Britain, as 11,072.76 miles rounding to 11,073 miles (17,820 km). If the larger islands are added the coastline, as measured by the standard method at Mean High Water Mark, rises to about 19,491 miles (31,368 km).


including historic

popular with developers url http: www.directionsmag.com pressreleases new-ordnance-survey-linked-data-service-proving-popular-with-developers 340085 date 17 July 2013 accessdate 28 July 2013 publisher Ordnance Survey Historical material Ordnance Survey historical works are generally available, as the agency is covered by Crown Copyright: works more than fifty years old, including historic surveys of Britain and Ireland and much of the New Popular Edition, are in the public domain. However, finding suitable originals remains an issue as Ordnance Survey does not provide historical mapping on 'free' terms, instead marketing commercially 'enhanced' reproductions in partnership with companies such as GroundSure and Landmark. This can be contrasted with, for example, the approach in the Republic of Ireland in more recent times, where Ordnance Survey Ireland claims regular copyright over its mapping (and over digital copies of the public domain historical mapping). Visual identity thumb Ordnance Survey logotype (File:Ordnance-survey-logo.svg) See also The Nine Standards offer a better viewpoint than the Ordnance Survey trig point that marks the actual summit of the fell. Cross Fell and Great Dun Fell can be seen to the north west and Wild Boar Fell and the Howgills (Howgill Fells) feature in the south west. The High Street Range (High Street (Lake District)) of the eastern Lake District can be seen further to the west. Great Shunner Fell, crossed by the Pennine Way, and Rogan's Seat lie to the south east. Etymology Enfield Wash was first recorded in 1675 and on the Ordnance Survey map of 1822, from Old English ''(ga)wæsc'' 'a place that floods': there was probably a ford (Ford (crossing)) here where Ermine Street crosses Turkey Brook. Mills. A. D. ''Oxford Dictionary of London Place Names'' (2001) pp3,77 ISBN 0198609574 Etymology Enfield Highway is marked thus on the Ordnance Survey map of 1822, it is a settlement mainly from the eighteenth century named from the '' kings highe way leading to London'' 1610, the highway being the Roman road Ermine Street (now the A1010 (A1010 road) Hertford Road). Mills. A. D. ''Oxford Dictionary of London Place Names'' (2001) page 76 ISBN 0198609574 Retrieved 21 October 2008 The mapping authority for the United Kingdom, the Ordnance Survey, records the coastline of the main island, Great Britain, as 11,072.76 miles rounding to 11,073 miles (17,820 km). If the larger islands are added the coastline, as measured by the standard method at Mean High Water Mark, rises to about 19,491 miles (31,368 km).


place+written

Survey were criticised for contracting the public relations company Mandate Communications to understand the dynamics of the free data movement (Open Data in the United Kingdom) and discover which politicians and advisers continue to support their current policies.<


high white

, which is also known as High White Stones due to a smattering of grey boulders in the vicinity of the highest point, has an Ordnance Survey column (Trig point) and a large cairn which also doubles as a wind shelter; a ruined fence also crosses the summit plateau.


title focus

practice. Main river valleys The main valleys between the hills are filled with alluvial deposits from the hills or sea. The county has many small rivers, most of which flow into the Bristol Channel. Many of the latter rivers now have clysts (the local name for a sluice


small great

), (1982), ''Domesday Book, 4, Hampshire''. Phillimore About northwest of Godshill, (although within the parish of Woodgreen) is Castle Hill, which is said to be the only likely relic of a Norman (Normans) fortification in the New Forest. Donn Small, Great Britain. Forestry Commission, John Chapman, (1987), ''Explore the New Forest: an official guide'', page 50. H.M.S.O File:Ryde map 1945.jpg A 1945 Ordnance Survey map

Ordnance Survey

thumb Ordnance Survey National Grid Grid square (File:Ordnance Survey 1-250000 - TF.jpg) TF from the Ordnance Survey National Grid, shown at a scale of 1:250,000. The map shows the Wash and the North Sea, as well as places within the counties of Lincolnshire, Cambridgeshire and Norfolk. thumb Part of an Ordnance Survey map, at the scale of one inch to the mile, from a New Popular Edition map published in 1946. (File:Grays Thurrockmap 1946.jpg) !-- References have been added retrospectively. The majority of the information on this page can be found on Ordnance Survey's page From one revolution to another, as per References list. ---

The '''Ordnance Survey''' ('''OS''') is the national mapping agency for Great Britain and is one of the world's largest producers of maps. It is a non-ministerial government department, executive agency and trading fund of the government (government of the United Kingdom) of the United Kingdom, List of ministerial responsibilities (including executive agencies and non-ministerial departments) where it falls under the remit of the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills. It is also a member of the Public Data Group.

The agency's name indicates its original military purpose (see ordnance (Ammunition#Ordnance ammunition) and surveying): mapping Scotland in the wake of the Jacobite rebellion in 1745 (Jacobite rising of 1745). There was also a more general and nationwide need in light of the potential threat of invasion during the Napoleonic Wars, reflected in the inclusion of the War Department (War Department (United Kingdom))'s broad arrow in the agency's logo.

Ordnance Survey mapping is usually classified as either "large-scale" (in other words, more detailed) or "small-scale". The Survey's large-scale mapping comprises maps at six inches to the mile or more (1:10,560, Read as "1 to 10,560"; in other words, with 1 inch on a map representing 10,560 inches on the ground. superseded by 1:10,000 in the 1950s) and was available as sheets until the 1980s, when it was digitised (Digitizing). Small-scale mapping comprises maps at fewer than six inches to the mile, such as the popular one inch to the mile "leisure" maps and their metric (Introduction to the metric system) successors. These are still available in traditional sheet form.

Ordnance Survey maps remain in copyright for fifty years after their publication. Some of the Copyright Libraries (Copyright library) hold complete or near-complete collections of pre-digital OS mapping.

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