Ordnance Survey

What is Ordnance Survey known for?


books writings

were: "''The persons employed on the survey are to endeavour to obtain the correct orthography of the names of places by diligently consulting the best authorities within their reach. The name of each place is to be inserted as it is commonly spelt, in the first column of the name book and the various modes of spelling it used in books, writings &c. are to be inserted in the second column, with the authority placed in the third column opposite to each.''" Whilst these procedures


title focus

practice. Main river valleys The main valleys between the hills are filled with alluvial deposits from the hills or sea. The county has many small rivers, most of which flow into the Bristol Channel. Many of the latter rivers now have clysts (the local name for a sluice


series covering

-18 United Kingdom The Ordnance Survey (OS) produces topographic map series covering the United Kingdom at 1:25,000 and 1:50,000 scales. The 1:25,000 scale is known as the "Explorer" series, and include an "OL" (Outdoor Leisure) sub-series for areas of special interest to hikers and walkers. It replaced the "Pathfinder" series, which was less colourful and covered a smaller area on each map. The 1:50,000 scale is known as the "


building style

. Sandy beach and the burgh of Thurso front the bay west of the river mouth. thumb right Three foot Theodolite used in the triangulation (File:3foottheodoliteramsden.jpg) The '''Principal Triangulation of Britain''' was a triangulation project carried out between 1783 and about 1853 at the instigation of the Director of the Ordnance Survey General William Roy (1726–1790). The building style of the now demolished Twenty Farm made it appear to have been built just before the railway station opened. The 1892 Ordnance Survey shows that very little other domestic building had been added to the hamlet after 25 years. The remarkable feature is the administrative nature of the new buildings. To the farm and railway station had been added the police station and school and that was virtually all. The map also makes it clear that by 1892, the name 'Twenty' had certainly been applied to the hamlet. The Nine Standards offer a better viewpoint than the Ordnance Survey trig point that marks the actual summit of the fell. Cross Fell and Great Dun Fell can be seen to the north west and Wild Boar Fell and the Howgills (Howgill Fells) feature in the south west. The High Street Range (High Street (Lake District)) of the eastern Lake District can be seen further to the west. Great Shunner Fell, crossed by the Pennine Way, and Rogan's Seat lie to the south east. Etymology Enfield Wash was first recorded in 1675 and on the Ordnance Survey map of 1822, from Old English ''(ga)wæsc'' 'a place that floods': there was probably a ford (Ford (crossing)) here where Ermine Street crosses Turkey Brook. Mills. A. D. ''Oxford Dictionary of London Place Names'' (2001) pp3,77 ISBN 0198609574 Etymology Enfield Highway is marked thus on the Ordnance Survey map of 1822, it is a settlement mainly from the eighteenth century named from the '' kings highe way leading to London'' 1610, the highway being the Roman road Ermine Street (now the A1010 (A1010 road) Hertford Road). Mills. A. D. ''Oxford Dictionary of London Place Names'' (2001) page 76 ISBN 0198609574 Retrieved 21 October 2008 The mapping authority for the United Kingdom, the Ordnance Survey, records the coastline of the main island, Great Britain, as 11,072.76 miles rounding to 11,073 miles (17,820 km). If the larger islands are added the coastline, as measured by the standard method at Mean High Water Mark, rises to about 19,491 miles (31,368 km).


title fishing

?mapAction gaz&gazName g&gazString NJ76002300 work Get-a-map publisher Ordnance Survey and this spelling is often used, possibly because of the association with Inverurie (which was itself spelled Inverury until the nineteenth century). Local people usually prefer the spelling "Ury" which is generally used by Aberdeenshire Council. The Nine Standards offer a better viewpoint than the Ordnance Survey trig point that marks the actual summit of the fell. Cross Fell and Great Dun Fell can be seen to the north west and Wild Boar Fell and the Howgills (Howgill Fells) feature in the south west. The High Street Range (High Street (Lake District)) of the eastern Lake District can be seen further to the west. Great Shunner Fell, crossed by the Pennine Way, and Rogan's Seat lie to the south east. Etymology Enfield Wash was first recorded in 1675 and on the Ordnance Survey map of 1822, from Old English ''(ga)wæsc'' 'a place that floods': there was probably a ford (Ford (crossing)) here where Ermine Street crosses Turkey Brook. Mills. A. D. ''Oxford Dictionary of London Place Names'' (2001) pp3,77 ISBN 0198609574 Etymology Enfield Highway is marked thus on the Ordnance Survey map of 1822, it is a settlement mainly from the eighteenth century named from the '' kings highe way leading to London'' 1610, the highway being the Roman road Ermine Street (now the A1010 (A1010 road) Hertford Road). Mills. A. D. ''Oxford Dictionary of London Place Names'' (2001) page 76 ISBN 0198609574 Retrieved 21 October 2008 The mapping authority for the United Kingdom, the Ordnance Survey, records the coastline of the main island, Great Britain, as 11,072.76 miles rounding to 11,073 miles (17,820 km). If the larger islands are added the coastline, as measured by the standard method at Mean High Water Mark, rises to about 19,491 miles (31,368 km).


range taking

The summit, looking north-west The summit of Helvellyn takes the form of a broad plateau about The Nine Standards offer a better viewpoint than the Ordnance Survey trig point that marks the actual summit of the fell. Cross Fell and Great Dun Fell can be seen to the north west and Wild Boar Fell and the Howgills (Howgill Fells) feature in the south west. The High Street Range (High Street (Lake District)) of the eastern Lake District can be seen further to the west. Great Shunner Fell, crossed by the Pennine Way, and Rogan's Seat lie to the south east. Etymology Enfield Wash was first recorded in 1675 and on the Ordnance Survey map of 1822, from Old English ''(ga)wæsc'' 'a place that floods': there was probably a ford (Ford (crossing)) here where Ermine Street crosses Turkey Brook. Mills. A. D. ''Oxford Dictionary of London Place Names'' (2001) pp3,77 ISBN 0198609574 Etymology Enfield Highway is marked thus on the Ordnance Survey map of 1822, it is a settlement mainly from the eighteenth century named from the '' kings highe way leading to London'' 1610, the highway being the Roman road Ermine Street (now the A1010 (A1010 road) Hertford Road). Mills. A. D. ''Oxford Dictionary of London Place Names'' (2001) page 76 ISBN 0198609574 Retrieved 21 October 2008 The mapping authority for the United Kingdom, the Ordnance Survey, records the coastline of the main island, Great Britain, as 11,072.76 miles rounding to 11,073 miles (17,820 km). If the larger islands are added the coastline, as measured by the standard method at Mean High Water Mark, rises to about 19,491 miles (31,368 km).


modern service

The Nine Standards offer a better viewpoint than the Ordnance Survey trig point that marks the actual summit of the fell. Cross Fell and Great Dun Fell can be seen to the north west and Wild Boar Fell and the Howgills (Howgill Fells) feature in the south west. The High Street Range (High Street (Lake District)) of the eastern Lake District can be seen further to the west. Great Shunner Fell, crossed by the Pennine Way, and Rogan's Seat lie to the south east. Etymology Enfield Wash was first recorded in 1675 and on the Ordnance Survey map of 1822, from Old English ''(ga)wæsc'' 'a place that floods': there was probably a ford (Ford (crossing)) here where Ermine Street crosses Turkey Brook. Mills. A. D. ''Oxford Dictionary of London Place Names'' (2001) pp3,77 ISBN 0198609574 Etymology Enfield Highway is marked thus on the Ordnance Survey map of 1822, it is a settlement mainly from the eighteenth century named from the '' kings highe way leading to London'' 1610, the highway being the Roman road Ermine Street (now the A1010 (A1010 road) Hertford Road). Mills. A. D. ''Oxford Dictionary of London Place Names'' (2001) page 76 ISBN 0198609574 Retrieved 21 October 2008 The mapping authority for the United Kingdom, the Ordnance Survey, records the coastline of the main island, Great Britain, as 11,072.76 miles rounding to 11,073 miles (17,820 km). If the larger islands are added the coastline, as measured by the standard method at Mean High Water Mark, rises to about 19,491 miles (31,368 km).


water passing

the result of ice age glaciation (glacier) and is very often associated with a large river, where erosion caused by the tidal effects of incoming sea water passing upriver has widened the riverbed into an estuary. Demarcation can be rather vague. The Firth of Clyde is sometimes thought to include the estuary as far upriver as Dumbarton, but the Ordnance Survey map shows the change from river to firth occurring off Port Glasgow, while locally the change is held


top location

The Marilyns by Height isbn 1-85284-068-4 url http: bubl.ac.uk org tacit marilyns chapter4.htm Dawson draws his information from various editions of Ordnance Survey maps, but he does not specify which. County Top (List of English counties by highest point) location For those who wish to climb the hill from the base, it is possible to do a circular walk from the village of Whipsnade by following the Icknield Way Path and Chiltern Way, both of which


created including

thumb Front cover of a one-inch to the mile New Popular Edition, from 1945. (File:Front cover of new popular edition.jpg) thumb Detailed scan of a complete 7th series sheet (File:London S.W. OS One-Inch 7th 170.jpg) During the World War I, Ordnance Survey was involved in preparing maps of France (Geography of France) and Belgium (Geography of Belgium). During World War II, many more maps were created, including: * 1:40000 scale map of Antwerp, Belgium * 1:100000 scale map

Ordnance Survey

thumb Ordnance Survey National Grid Grid square (File:Ordnance Survey 1-250000 - TF.jpg) TF from the Ordnance Survey National Grid, shown at a scale of 1:250,000. The map shows the Wash and the North Sea, as well as places within the counties of Lincolnshire, Cambridgeshire and Norfolk. thumb Part of an Ordnance Survey map, at the scale of one inch to the mile, from a New Popular Edition map published in 1946. (File:Grays Thurrockmap 1946.jpg) !-- References have been added retrospectively. The majority of the information on this page can be found on Ordnance Survey's page From one revolution to another, as per References list. ---

The '''Ordnance Survey''' ('''OS''') is the national mapping agency for Great Britain and is one of the world's largest producers of maps. It is a non-ministerial government department, executive agency and trading fund of the government (government of the United Kingdom) of the United Kingdom, List of ministerial responsibilities (including executive agencies and non-ministerial departments) where it falls under the remit of the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills. It is also a member of the Public Data Group.

The agency's name indicates its original military purpose (see ordnance (Ammunition#Ordnance ammunition) and surveying): mapping Scotland in the wake of the Jacobite rebellion in 1745 (Jacobite rising of 1745). There was also a more general and nationwide need in light of the potential threat of invasion during the Napoleonic Wars, reflected in the inclusion of the War Department (War Department (United Kingdom))'s broad arrow in the agency's logo.

Ordnance Survey mapping is usually classified as either "large-scale" (in other words, more detailed) or "small-scale". The Survey's large-scale mapping comprises maps at six inches to the mile or more (1:10,560, Read as "1 to 10,560"; in other words, with 1 inch on a map representing 10,560 inches on the ground. superseded by 1:10,000 in the 1950s) and was available as sheets until the 1980s, when it was digitised (Digitizing). Small-scale mapping comprises maps at fewer than six inches to the mile, such as the popular one inch to the mile "leisure" maps and their metric (Introduction to the metric system) successors. These are still available in traditional sheet form.

Ordnance Survey maps remain in copyright for fifty years after their publication. Some of the Copyright Libraries (Copyright library) hold complete or near-complete collections of pre-digital OS mapping.

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