Omaha, Nebraska

What is Omaha, Nebraska known for?


based record

, presented the trophy to ''Louisiana'' s crew. '''''Fevers and Mirrors''''' is the third album by the Nebraska emo indie (Indie rock) band Bright Eyes (Bright Eyes (band)), recorded in 1999 and released on May 29, 2000. It was the 32nd release of the Omaha, Nebraska-based record label Saddle Creek Records. The album was released later in 2000 in the United Kingdom as the inaugural release from Wichita Recordings.

Omaha, Nebraska, and is the frontman of indie rock groups Cursive (Cursive (band)) and The Good Life (The Good Life (band)), both of which are on the Omaha based record label Saddle


philanthropic work

to Vietnam . He was an ambassador until 2001, after which he devoted himself to philanthropic work. birth_date birth_place Omaha (Omaha, Nebraska), Nebraska, U.S. (United States) death_date Early life He was born in Omaha, Nebraska, grew up and attended high school in Marshfield, Wisconsin, although he attended Lake Forest Academy in Lake Forest, Illinois his junior year. He was nicknamed "Bambino" (shortened to "Bom


place+field

& Company. p. 204. Beginning in the late 19th century, Omaha's upper class lived in posh enclaves throughout the city, including the south and north (Gold Coast Historic District (Omaha, Nebraska)) Gold Coast neighborhoods, Bemis Park, Kountze Place, Field Club and throughout Midtown Omaha. They traveled the city's sprawling park system (Parks in Omaha, Nebraska) on boulevards (Boulevards in Omaha) designed by renowned landscape architect Horace Cleveland. Morton, J.S. and Watkins, A. (1918) "Chapter XXXV: Greater Omaha," ''History of Nebraska: From the Earliest Explorations of the Trans-Mississippi Region''. Lincoln, NE: Western Publishing and Engraving Company. p. 831. The Omaha Horse Railway first carried passengers throughout the city, as did the later Omaha Cable Tramway Company and several similar companies. In 1888, the Omaha and Council Bluffs Railway and Bridge Company built the Douglas Street Bridge, the first pedestrian and wagon bridge between Omaha and Council Bluffs. United States Army Corps of Engineers. (1888) ''Annual Report of the Chief of Engineers to the Secretary of War for the Year''. GPO. p. 309. Retrieved 4 11 08. Gambling, drinking and prostitution were widespread in the 19th century, first rampant in the city's Burnt District and later in the Sporting District (Sporting District (Omaha, Nebraska)). Larsen, L.H. and Cottrell, B.J. (1997) ''The Gate City: A history of Omaha.'' University of Nebraska Press. p. 94–95. Controlled by Omaha's political boss Tom Dennison (Tom Dennison (Political boss)) by 1890, criminal elements (Crime in Omaha) enjoyed support from Omaha's "perpetual" mayor, "Cowboy Jim" (James Dahlman) Dahlman, nicknamed for his eight terms as mayor. Folsom, B.W. (1999) ''No More Free Markets Or Free Beer: The Progressive Era in Nebraska, 1900–1924.'' Lexington Books. p. 59. Larsen, L.H. and Cottrell, B.J. (1997) ''The Gate City: A history of Omaha.'' University of Nebraska Press. p. 183–184. Calamities such as the Great Flood of 1881 did not slow down the city's violence. Larsen, L.H. and Cottrell, B.J. (1997) ''The Gate City: A history of Omaha.'' University of Nebraska Press. p. 183. In 1882, the Camp Dump Strike pitted state militia against unionized strikers, drawing national attention to Omaha's labor troubles. The Governor of Nebraska had to call in U.S. Army troops from nearby Fort Omaha to protect strikebreakers for the Burlington Railroad, bringing along Gatling guns and a cannon for defense. When the event ended, one man was dead and several were wounded. "The strike at Omaha", ''The New York Times.'' March 12, 1882. In 1891, a mob hanged Joe Coe, an African-American porter after he was accused of raping a white girl. There were several other riots and civil unrest events in Omaha (List of riots and civil unrest in Omaha, Nebraska) during this period as well. In 1898, Omaha's leaders, under the guidance of Gurdon Wattles, held the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, touted as a celebration of agricultural and industrial growth throughout the Midwest. "About the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition". Omaha Public Library. Retrieved 9 5 08. The Indian Congress, which drew more than 500 American Indians (Native Americans in the United States) from across the country, was held simultaneously. More than 2 million visitors attended these events, located at Kountze Park and the Omaha Driving Park in the Kountze Place neighborhood. Larsen, L. and Cottrell, B. (1997) ''The Gate City: A history of Omaha.'' University of Nebraska Press. p. 43. 20th century With dramatically increasing population in the 20th century, there was major civil unrest in Omaha, resulting from competition and fierce labor struggles. Larsen and Cotrell. (1997) ''The Gate City: A history of Omaha.'' University of Nebraska Press. p. 135. In 1900, Omaha was the center of a national uproar over the kidnapping of Edward Cudahy, Jr., the son of a local meatpacking magnate. "Cudahy Kidnapping". Nebraska State Historical Society. Retrieved 9 25 07. The city's labor and management clashed in bitter strikes, racial tension (Racial tension in Omaha, Nebraska) escalated as blacks were hired as strikebreakers, and ethnic strife broke out. Larsen, L.H. and Cottrell, B.J. (1997) ''The Gate City: A history of Omaha.'' University of Nebraska Press. p. 172. A major riot (Greek Town Riot) by ethnic whites in South Omaha destroyed the city's Greek Town in 1909, completely driving out the Greek population. "South Omaha mob wars on Greeks", ''The New York Times.'' February 22, 1909. Retrieved 5 25 08. The civil rights movement in Omaha (Civil Rights Movement in Omaha, Nebraska) has roots that extend back to 1912, when the first chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People west of the Mississippi River was founded in the city. Nebraska Writers Project. (1940) ''The Negroes of Nebraska.'' Works Progress Administration. Woodruff Printing Company. p. 45. The Omaha Easter Sunday Tornado of 1913 (Omaha Easter Sunday Tornado (1913)) destroyed much of the city's African-American (African Americans in Omaha, Nebraska) community, in addition to much of Midtown Omaha. "Easter came early in 1913", NOAA National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office. Retrieved 9 6 08. Six years later, in 1919, the city was caught up in the Red Summer riots when thousands of ethnic whites marched from South Omaha to the courthouse to lynch a black worker, Willy Brown, a suspect in an alleged rape of a white woman. The mob burned the Douglas County Courthouse (Douglas County Courthouse (Nebraska)) to get the prisoner, causing more than $1,000,000 damage. They hung and shot Will Brown, then burned his body. (1994) ''Street of Dreams.'' (VHS) Nebraska Public Television. Troops were called in from Fort Omaha to quell the riot, prevent more crowds gathering in South Omaha, and to protect the black community in North Omaha. Leighton, G.R. (1939) ''Five Cities: The Story of Their Youth and Old Age.'' Ayer Publishing. p. 212. The culture of North Omaha (Culture in North Omaha, Nebraska) thrived throughout the 1920s through 1950s, with several creative figures, including Tillie Olsen, Wallace Thurman, Lloyd Hunter, and Anna Mae Winburn emerging from the vibrant Near North Side. Salzman, J., Smith, D.J. and West, C. (1996) ''Encyclopedia of African-American Culture and History.'' Macmillan Library Reference. p. 1974. Musicians created their own world in Omaha, and also joined national bands and groups that toured and appeared in the city. "Nebraska National Register Sites in Douglas County." Nebraska State Historical Society. Retrieved 4 30 07. thumb upright The first aircraft to drop an atomic bomb, the Enola Gay (File:Tibbets-wave.jpg) was built at Offutt Air Force Base, located south of Omaha. After the tumultuous Great Depression of the 1930s, Omaha rebounded with the development of Offutt Air Force Base just south of the city. The Glenn L. Martin Company operated a factory there in the 1940s that produced 521 B-29 ''Superfortresses'', including the ''Enola Gay'' and ''Bockscar'' used in the atomic bombing of Japan (Atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki) in World War II. (2006) ''Economic Impact Analysis: Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska.'' United States Air Force. Retrieved 5 28 08. The construction of Interstates (Interstate highway) 80 (Interstate 80), 480 (Interstate 480 (Iowa–Nebraska)) and 680 (Interstate 680 (Iowa–Nebraska)), along with the North Omaha Freeway, spurred development. There was also controversy, particularly in North Omaha, where several neighborhoods were bisected by new routes. (2001) "State's top community development projects honored", Nebraska Department of Economic Development. Retrieved 4 7 07. Creighton University hosted the DePorres Club, an early civil rights group whose sit-in strategies for integration of public facilities predated the national movement, starting in 1947. (2004) "125 years of memorable moments," ''The Creightonian Online. 83''(19). Retrieved 7 23 07. Following the development of the Glenn L. Martin Company bomber manufacturing plant in Bellevue (Bellevue, Nebraska) at the beginning of World War II, the relocation of the Strategic Air Command to the Omaha suburb in 1948 provided a major economic boost to the area. Wishart, D.J. (2004) ''Encyclopedia of the Great Plains.'' University of Nebraska Press. p. 72. From the 1950s through the 1960s, more than 40 insurance companies were headquartered in Omaha, including Woodmen of the World and Mutual of Omaha. By the late 1960s, the city rivaled, but never surpassed, the United States insurance centers of Hartford, Connecticut, New York City and Boston, Massachusetts. Bednarek, R.D. (1992) ''The Changing Image of the City: Planning for Downtown Omaha, 1945–1973''. University of Nebraska Press, 1992 p. 57. After surpassing Chicago in meat processing by the late 1950s, Omaha suffered the loss of 10,000 jobs as both the railroad and meatpacking industries restructured. The city struggled for decades to shift its economy as workers suffered. Poverty became more entrenched among families who remained in North Omaha. In the 1960s, three major race riots along North 24th Street destroyed the Near North Side's economic base, with recovery slow for decades. Luebtke, F.C. (2005) ''Nebraska: An Illustrated History.'' University of Nebraska Press. p. 372. In 1969, Woodmen Tower was completed and became Omaha's tallest building and first major skyscraper at The final round of the 2009 College World Series (w:2009 College World Series) of baseball is set, with eight teams qualifying for the double-elimination tournament (w:Double-elimination tournament). The tournament will begin play on June 13 at Rosenblatt Stadium (w:Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium) in Omaha (w:Omaha, Nebraska), Nebraska in the United States. The College World Series is the final leg of a three-tiered tournament (w:2009 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament) which determines the top baseball team in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (w:National Collegiate Athletic Association) (NCAA) Division I (w:Division I)— the top level of play in American college athletics (w:College athletics). The College World Series has been played annually at Rosenblatt Stadium since 1950. left thumb Rosenblatt Stadium, home of the College World Series since 1950 (File:P5160356.JPG) In May of 2007, it was reported that blood samples taken from a Hammerhead shark (w:Hammerhead shark), born in 2001, located in Omaha Nebraska (w:Omaha, Nebraska) at the Henry Doorly Zoo (w:Henry Doorly Zoo) was the product of a "virgin birth". The mother shark was in a tank with three other hammerheads, all female, and the baby shark was also born in the same tank. Tests on the DNA from the baby shark show that there was no "chromosomal contribution" of a male shark present in the blood, something that is required in order for mating to have taken place.


annual national

(Omaha version) World Heavyweight Championship (2 times) - Lawrence-Dumont Stadium is also home to the annual National Baseball Congress World Series, the annual North American championship of the NBC, an organization of 15 amateur and semi-professional baseball leagues operating in the United States and Canada. It has been played in Wichita at L-D Stadium annually since 1935. In 1949, the ballpark was the last to host the College World Series before Omaha

left - Creighton University Creighton Omaha, Nebraska Timothy R. Lannon, S.J. 6,992 Bluejays Blue, White 1878 1160 - '''Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium''' is a baseball stadium in Omaha, Nebraska, the former home to the annual

NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) Division I (Division I (NCAA)) College World Series and the minor league (minor league baseball) Omaha Royals, now known as the Omaha Storm Chasers. Rosenblatt Stadium was the largest minor league baseball stadium in the United States (a distinction now held by Buffalo, New York's Coca-Cola Field).


time starting

childhood illness to excel in youth sports, particularly basketball and baseball. After briefly playing under contract to both the basketball Harlem Globetrotters team and the St. Louis Cardinals organization, Gibson decided to only continue playing baseball professionally. Once becoming a full-time starting pitcher in July 1961 Gibson began experiencing an increasing level of success, earning his first All-Star appearance in 1962. Gibson won two of three games he pitched in the 1964 World Series, then won 20 games in season for the first time in 1965. Gibson also pitched three complete game victories in the 1967 World Series. Early life Gibson was born in Omaha, Nebraska, the final of Pack and Victoria Gibson's seven children (five boys and two girls). Gibson and Wheeler 1994 (#Gib94): 11, 14 Halberstam 1994 (#Hal94): 98 Gibson's father died of tuberculosis three months prior to his birth, and Gibson himself was named Pack Robert Gibson in his father's honor. Gibson and Wheeler 1994 (#Gib94): 11 While he revered his father's legacy, Gibson disliked the name Pack, and later changed his first name to Robert. The final round of the 2009 College World Series (w:2009 College World Series) of baseball is set, with eight teams qualifying for the double-elimination tournament (w:Double-elimination tournament). The tournament will begin play on June 13 at Rosenblatt Stadium (w:Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium) in Omaha (w:Omaha, Nebraska), Nebraska in the United States. The College World Series is the final leg of a three-tiered tournament (w:2009 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament) which determines the top baseball team in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (w:National Collegiate Athletic Association) (NCAA) Division I (w:Division I)— the top level of play in American college athletics (w:College athletics). The College World Series has been played annually at Rosenblatt Stadium since 1950. left thumb Rosenblatt Stadium, home of the College World Series since 1950 (File:P5160356.JPG) In May of 2007, it was reported that blood samples taken from a Hammerhead shark (w:Hammerhead shark), born in 2001, located in Omaha Nebraska (w:Omaha, Nebraska) at the Henry Doorly Zoo (w:Henry Doorly Zoo) was the product of a "virgin birth". The mother shark was in a tank with three other hammerheads, all female, and the baby shark was also born in the same tank. Tests on the DNA from the baby shark show that there was no "chromosomal contribution" of a male shark present in the blood, something that is required in order for mating to have taken place.


musical sound

. Expanding on their previous musical sound that mostly incorporated guitars, vocals, percussion and pianos, the album contains heavy electronica sampling mixed into the songs in a rather unusual and displaced-sounding way. Also, unlike their previous tracks which were written in very traditional manners, the lyrics to the songs on ''Execution'' are very wordy and read like prose. Musically, the record has a very sunny disposition, with bouncing bass lines and simple melodies complemented by lead


episode work

first Mike title Good and evil to duke it out in new "South Park" episode work Detroit Free Press date 1998-02-04 page 6C In fact, Parker and Stone originally intended for "Damien" to be the season's Christmas episode. Although they had long planned to feature Mr. Hankey in the show, they did not decide to make him a Christmas character until halfway through the filming of "Damien", during which time they decided to make "Mr. Hankey


band version

of Songs Written and Recorded 1995-1997 ''. "Opened and Spent" is an early version of the Bright Eyes song "Act of Contrition". "Flying J" is a live, full band version of "J-Bone" from ''Here's to Special Treatment''. *September 19 - The Union Association drops the Wilmington Quicksteps and Pittsburgh Stogies (Chicago Browns Pittsburgh Stogies) and replaces them with the Milwaukee Brewers (Milwaukee Brewers (UA)) and a team from Omaha


giving performances

Tacoma. Exposition Harry Van (Clark Gable), an American World War I veteran, tries to reenter show biz and ends up in a faltering mentalist (Mentalism) show with an inept, aging alcoholic, Madame Zuleika (Laura Hope Crews). While giving performances in Omaha (Omaha, Nebraska), he is courted by Irene (Norma Shearer), a trapeze artist (Trapeze), who claims to come from Russia and hopes both to replace Harry's drunken partner in the show and be his lover. They have


performance featured

his death, they write, it was decided to go ahead with the special as a tribute. Although both the June 19th and 21st concerts are the last official live professional one's ever recorded of Presley alive, Vernon Presley, Elvis' father, recorded a message that was broadcast at the end of the special and included on the soundtrack album, in which he erroneously states that the performance featured was his son's last appearance; in fact Elvis made five more concert appearances after

Omaha, Nebraska

area_magnitude 1 E8 established_title Founded established_title2 Incorporated (Municipal corporation) established_date 1854 established_date2 1857

unit_pref Imperial area_footnotes area_magnitude area_total_km2 338.20 area_land_km2 329.16 area_water_km2 9.04 area_total_sq_mi 130.58 area_land_sq_mi 127.09 area_water_sq_mi 3.49

population_as_of 2010 (2010 United States Census) population_est 434353 pop_est_as_of 2013 population_footnotes population_total 408958 population_rank US: 42nd (List of United States cities by population) population_density_km2 1242.4 population_density_sq_mi 3217.9 population_urban 725,008 (US: 58th (List of United States urban areas)) population_metro 895,151 (US: 60th (List of Metropolitan Statistical Areas)) population_Combined_Statistical_Area 931,666 (US: 57th (List of Combined Statistical Areas)) timezone CST (Central Time Zone (North America)) utc_offset -6 timezone_DST CDT (Central Time Zone (North America)) utc_offset_DST -5 coordinates_display display inline,title latd 41 latm 15 latNS N longd 96 longm 0 longEW W elevation_m 332 elevation_ft 1090 postal_code_type ZIP codes postal_code 68022, 68101–68164 area_code 402 (Area code 402), 531 (Area code 531) blank_name FIPS code (Federal Information Processing Standard) blank_info 31-37000 blank1_name GNIS (Geographic Names Information System) feature ID blank1_info 0835483 website www.cityofomaha.org footnotes

'''Omaha''' It is located in the Midwestern United States on the Missouri River, about 10 miles (16 km) north of the mouth of the Platte River. Omaha is the anchor of the Omaha-Council Bluffs metropolitan area, which includes Council Bluffs (Council Bluffs, Iowa), Iowa, across the Missouri River from Omaha. According to the 2010 census (2010 United States Census), Omaha's population was 408,958, making it the nation's 42nd-largest city (List of United States cities by population). According to the 2013 Population Estimates, Omaha's population was 434,353. Including its suburbs, Omaha formed the 60th-largest metropolitan area in the United States in 2013 with an estimated population of 895,151 residing in eight counties (County (United States)). The Omaha-Council Bluffs-Fremont, NE-IA Combined Statistical Area is 931,666, according to the U.S. Census Bureau's 2013 estimate. List of Combined Statistical Areas There are nearly 1.3 million residents within a 50-mile (80-km) radius of the city's center (Downtown Omaha), forming the Greater Omaha area.

Omaha's pioneer period began in 1854 when the city was founded by speculators from neighboring Council Bluffs, Iowa. The city was founded along the Missouri River, and a crossing called Lone Tree Ferry earned the city its nickname, the "Gateway to the West." It introduced this new West to the world when in 1898 it played host to the World's Fair, dubbed the Trans-Mississippi Exposition. During the 19th century, Omaha's central location in the United States spurred the city to become an important national transportation hub (Transportation in Omaha). Throughout the rest of the 19th century, the transportation and jobbing (Wholesale) sectors were important in the city, along with its railroads (Railroads in Omaha) and breweries (Brewery). In the 20th century, the Omaha Stockyards, once the world's largest, and its meatpacking plants, gained international prominence.

Today, Omaha is the home to the headquarters of five Fortune 500 companies: packaged-food giant ConAgra Foods; the U.S.'s largest railroad operator, Union Pacific Corporation; insurance and financial firm Mutual of Omaha; one of the world's largest construction companies, Kiewit Corporation; and mega-conglomerate Berkshire Hathaway. Boettcher, Ross. "Mutual returns to Fortune 500". ''Omaha World-Herald''. April 16, 2010. Retrieved April 28, 2010. Berkshire Hathaway is headed by local investor Warren Buffett, one of the richest people in the world, according to a decade's worth of Forbes Magazine rankings, some of which have ranked him as high as No. 1. Kroll, L. "Special report: The World's Billionaires", ''Forbes'' magazine. March 5, 2008. Omaha is also the home to five Fortune 1000 headquarters: TD Ameritrade, West Corporation, Valmont Industries, Green Plains Renewable Energy and Werner Enterprises. First National Bank of Omaha is the largest privately held bank in the United States. Headquarters for Leo A Daly, HDR, Inc. and DLR Group, three of the US's largest 10 architecture engineering firms, are based in Omaha. The Gallup Organization, of Gallup Poll fame, also is based in Omaha, with its riverfront Gallup University. Enron began in Omaha as Northern Natural Gas in 1930 before taking over a smaller Houston company in 1985 to form InterNorth (Enron), which was moved permanently to Houston in 1987 by the notorious Kenneth Lay.

The modern economy of Omaha is diverse and built on skilled knowledge jobs. In 2009, ''Forbes'' identified Omaha as the nation's number one "Best Bang-For-The Buck City" and number one on "America's Fastest-Recovering Cities" list. Tourism in Omaha benefits the city's economy greatly, with the annual College World Series providing important revenue and the city's Henry Doorly Zoo serving as the top attraction in Nebraska. Omaha hosted the U.S. Olympic swim trials in 2008, 2012, and will host the event again in 2016.

Notable modern Omaha inventions include the TV dinner, developed by Omaha's then-Carl Swanson Co.; the "Top 40" radio format, pioneered by Todd Storz, scion of Omaha's Storz Brewing Co., and head of Storz Broadcasting, which was the first in the U.S. to use the "Top 40" format at Omaha's KOWH Radio. A character in a Rudyard Kipling essay claimed "dice were invented in Omaha, and the man who invented 'em, he made a colossal fortune." From Sea to Sea: Letters of Travel - Rudyard Kipling - Google Books. Books.google.com. Retrieved on 2013-07-12.

A historic preservation movement in Omaha has led to a number of historic structures and districts being designated Omaha Landmarks or listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Much of the push toward preservation came after Omaha gained the notorious designation of having, in 1989, demolished the largest-ever National Register historic district in the United States, a record that still stands as of 2013. The Jobbers Canyon Historic District, along the Missouri River, was felled for a new headquarters campus for ConAgra Foods, a company which threatened to relocate if Omaha did not allow them to raze the city's historic district. The Jobber's Canyon warehouses had before then been allowed to deteriorate and were the scene of several fires set by the homeless population that had come to live in the abandoned buildings. At the time, there were no plans in place for revitalizing the buildings. Gratz, R.B. (1996) ''Living City: How America's Cities Are Being Revitalized by Thinking Small in a Big Way.'' John Wiley and Sons. p. V. National Trust for Historic Preservation and Zagars, J. (1997) ''Preservation Yellow Pages: The Complete Information Source for Homeowners, Communities, and Professionals.'' John Wiley and Sons. p. 80.

Since its founding, ethnic groups in the city (Ethnic groups in Omaha, Nebraska) have clustered in enclaves (Ethnic enclave) in north (North Omaha, Nebraska), south (South Omaha, Nebraska) and downtown Omaha. In its early days, the sometimes lawless nature of a new frontier city (History of Omaha, Nebraska) included crime (Crime in Omaha), such as illicit gambling (Gambling in Omaha, Nebraska) and riots (List of riots and civil unrest in Omaha, Nebraska).

Today, the diverse culture of Omaha (Culture of Omaha, Nebraska) includes a variety of performance venues, museums, and musical heritage, including the historically significant jazz scene in North Omaha and the modern and influential "Omaha Sound".

Sports (Sports in Omaha, Nebraska) have been important in Omaha for more than a century, and the city currently plays host to three minor-league professional sports teams. It is perhaps more known as the home of the College World Series, to which it has played host since 1950. The Kings, an NBA franchise, called Omaha and Kansas City (Kansas City, Missouri) home from 1972 to 1978. The Kansas City-Omaha Kings (Sacramento Kings) split their time between the two cities, playing at Kansas City's Municipal Auditorium and the Omaha Civic Auditorium, before decamping solely to Kansas City until 1985, when the team moved to its current home of Sacramento (Sacramento, California).

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