Old Montreal

What is Old Montreal known for?


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to combine the settlers and Native Americans had vanished. The arrival in 1657 of Marguerite Bourgeoys (who founded the ''Congregation Notre-Dame''), and the arrival of the Jesuits and Recollets in 1692, helped to ensure the Catholic character of the settlement. The original fortifications of Montreal, erected in 1717 by Gaspard Chaussegros de Léry, formed the boundaries of Montreal at the time. De Léry had the fortifications constructed in order to secure the settlement from


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Metro) Atwater and Lucien-L'Allier (Lucien-L'Allier (Montreal Metro)) metro stations.


biography online

MATHIESON, ALEXANDER last Armstrong first Frederick H. coauthors University of Toronto, Université Laval year 2000 work Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online publisher Government of Canada accessdate 14 November 2010 The cathedral burned to the ground in 1869 and was quickly rebuilt on the same location. imagesize image_caption The skyline of Old Montreal as seen from the Old Port (Old Port of Montreal). image_flag


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a British (United Kingdom) invasion and to allow future expansion inside the walls. Though the walls may have provided security from invasion, they led to a different problem; a large concentration of wooden houses (with fireplaces) led to many devastating fires. In 1721, Montreal received a royal order from France to ban wood construction; buildings were to be constructed using stone, but the ban was never fully respected . British rule right thumb Notre-Dame Basilica alt Notre-Dame Basilica, with two steeples, against blue sky (Image:NDame.jpg) ''Canada (New France)'' became a British colony in 1763 after the French and Indian War. British rule would radically change the face of Old Montreal. Until the late 18th century the impact was not visible, as construction methods inherited from the French regime continued. However, distrust of the British authorities of the Catholic clergy caused the departure of several from Old Montreal. Another factor changed the appearance of Old Montreal: fires. Wood construction and an increased population density due to the construction of fortifications caused many fires, and conflagrations have reconfigured Old Montreal. The fires of 1765 and 1768 destroyed nearly half the buildings in the old city. In May 1765, fire destroyed about 110 houses before destroying the old ''Hôtel de Callière'' and the former General Hospital. In April 1768, 88 houses between ''rue Saint-Jean-Baptiste'' and Hotel Vaudreuil were burned, including the ''Congregation Notre-Dame'' convent. In following years, the city was to be rebuilt even more densely. On 6 June 1803 a massive fire destroyed the prison, the church and the dependencies of Jesuits, a dozen houses and the Château Vaudreuil. Two speculators bought the Château's gardens, offered one-third to the city, and divided the rest into seven lots of their own. The city's oldest monument, Nelson's Column (Nelson's Column, Montreal), was erected in 1809 on the land given to the city. This space became the new market square, called ''Marché Neuf'' (New Market) before assuming its present name of Place Jacques-Cartier in 1845. The space occupied by the church of the Jesuits became the Place Vauquelin, and Montreal City Hall arose from the old Jesuit gardens in 1873. thumb 205x205px (File:Fete du Canada 2013, Vieux-Port de Montreal - 106.jpg) thumb 267x267px (File:Old Port of Montreal.jpg) thumb 226x226px (File:Old Montreal CA in eveninglight.jpg) In 1812 a fire destroyed the Mansion House, a luxurious hotel popular with the Beaver Club and which had housed the first public library in Montreal (with over 7,000 volumes). It was replaced by the British-American Hotel, with the city's first permanent theatre (the Royal Theatre built by John Molson, which was visited by Charles Dickens). The hotel burned in 1833, and was rebuilt in 1845 at the Bonsecours Market. In 1849, a riot caused a fire with political consequences when, protesting against a law, a ''Tory (Tories#Canada)'' crowd burned down the Parliament building (Burning of the Parliament Buildings in Montreal) in the old ''Marché Saint-Anne'' on ''Place d'Youville''. Ironically, the site of the Parliament fire housed Montreal's first fire station in 1903; the building still exists as the ''Centre d’histoire de Montréal''. left thumb Customs House at Place-Royale alt Front of old, two-story gray building (Image:Customs House Montreal.jpg) Colonial authorities decided upon the first radical transformation of the area in 1804, with the destruction of the fortifications surrounding the heart of Montreal. Completed in 1815, this enlarged the perimeter of Old Montreal and improved access to suburban communities. Confinement in a fortified and very dense area prone to fires caused the gradual departure of the richer merchants to what would become known as the Golden Square Mile, where they built spacious estates. The 19th century witnessed the emergence of a bourgeoisie of mostly Scottish merchants. The growing activity of the port changed the urban landscape. Old Montreal became less residential, as the rich Scottish and English merchants built extravagant homes closer to Mont Royal in what would become the Golden Square Mile. Anglophone influence became the dominating force in the areas of banking, manufacturing, commerce, and finance. St. James Street (Saint Jacques Street) became the financial centre of Montreal, with large banks such as the Bank of Montreal (Bank of Montreal Head Office, Montreal) and the Royal Bank (Old Royal Bank Building, Montreal), insurance companies and the stock exchange. thumb 200x200px (File:Vieux-Port de Montreal 10.JPG) Most of the financial buildings on St. James Street were designed by anglophone architects. The same is true for institutional buildings such as the Old Court House (John Ostell), the Customs House(John Ostell), the Bonsecours Market and even the Notre-Dame Basilica (Notre-Dame Basilica (Montreal)) (whose façade is the work of an Irish Protestant from New York, James O'Donnell). The only notable exception is the Montreal City Hall, which was inspired by the Hotel de Ville de Rennes. The character of the Victorian (Victorian architecture) style of the late-19th-century buildings was a significant change from the stone masonry used during French era, and affected the appearance of Old Montreal. Decline, preservation and renewal thumb right Place d'Youville looking west, with obelisk and Lyman Building (1908) alt Obelisk and four-story building on winter evening (Image:Plyouville1.JPG) During the early 20th century the momentum of the district continued to grow, evidenced by construction of prestigious buildings such as the Aldred Building (1929–1931), ''La Sauvegarde'' Building (1913) or the first Stock Exchange (1903–1904). Port activities, the financial sector, justice and the municipal government helped maintain activity until the Great Depression began in 1929. The relocation of port facilities further east deprived Old Montreal of many companies related to the maritime trade, leaving many abandoned warehouses and commercial buildings. The downtown-area relocation several blocks north and the nearly-complete absence of residents (there were only a few hundred in 1950) had the effect of emptying the district at the close of business. At that time, the lack of nightlife gave the district a reputation for danger at night. Old Montreal increasingly found itself changing to accommodate the automobile. Several prestigious locations, such as the Place d'Armes, the ''Place d'Youville'' and Place Jacques-Cartier, were snarled with traffic in the mid-20th century. For municipal authorities unaware of its potential heritage value, Old Montreal was an anomaly. City planners considered wider streets, which would have meant razing many older buildings. A proposed elevated highway along the river over the ''rue de la Commune'' spurred a movement to preserve the district. Dutch-born architect and urban planner Daniel van Ginkel (Sandy van Ginkel) played a major role in saving the district from destruction during the early 1960s. As assistant director of the city of Montreal's newly formed planning department, he persuaded authorities to abandon plans for an expressway that would have cut through the old city. Stretching for over two kilometres along the St-Lawrence River in Old Montreal, the '''Old Port Of Montreal''' has been the social, economic and cultural soul of Montreal ever since early French (France) fur traders used it as a trading post in 1611. It was here that the city and the port came to life more than 350 years ago. History At the Immaculate Conception Centre, a circus school begins to attract young artists interested in theatrical acrobatics. A real passion for all circus arts develops, training expands. Programming evolves as students of various backgrounds come together, united by a firm intention to become true circus artists. Very soon the Immaculate Conception Centre can no longer contain the rapid growth of the National Circus School (NCS). In 1989 the School moved to the Dalhousie station facilities in Old Montreal. The only institution to offer professional circus teaching in North America, the NCS has become one of the world's major circus schools.


commercial building

. Montreal's '''New York Life Insurance Building''' (also known as the '''Quebec Bank Building''') was erected in 1887-1889. Located at Place d'Armes in what is now known as Old Montreal, it was the tallest commercial building in Montreal at the time. The first eight floors were designed for retail office space, though were quickly rented by the city's best lawyers and financiers. As such, when the clock tower was completed, the 9th and 10th floors were occupied by the largest legal


philanthropic work

in Canada, incorporated within the Hudson's Bay Company in the 1970s; the Bank of Montreal; Redpath Sugar; and both of Canada's national railroads. The city boomed as railways were built to New England, Toronto, and the west, and factories (factory) were established along the Lachine Canal. Many buildings from this time period are concentrated in the area known today as Old Montreal. Noted for their philanthropic (philanthropy) work, Scots established and funded numerous


impressive+main

and Managers Association of Canada In 1962, the Royal Bank moved its main office to another famous Montreal building, Place Ville-Marie. The Royal Bank still keeps a branch in the impressive main hall of the old building, situated in Old Montreal. That branch is scheduled to relocate to the nearby Tour de la Bourse in 2012Market''' ( Stretching for over two kilometres along the St-Lawrence River in Old Montreal , the '''Old Port Of Montreal''' has been the social, economic and cultural soul of Montreal ever since early French (France) fur traders used it as a trading post in 1611. It was here that the city and the port came to life more than 350 years ago. History At the Immaculate Conception Centre, a circus school begins to attract young artists interested in theatrical acrobatics. A real passion for all circus arts develops, training expands. Programming evolves as students of various backgrounds come together, united by a firm intention to become true circus artists. Very soon the Immaculate Conception Centre can no longer contain the rapid growth of the National Circus School (NCS). In 1989 the School moved to the Dalhousie station facilities in Old Montreal. The only institution to offer professional circus teaching in North America, the NCS has become one of the world's major circus schools.


extravagant

, where they built spacious estates. The 19th century witnessed the emergence of a bourgeoisie of mostly Scottish merchants. The growing activity of the port changed the urban landscape. Old Montreal became less residential, as the rich Scottish and English merchants built extravagant homes closer to Mont Royal in what would become the Golden Square Mile. Anglophone influence became the dominating force in the areas of banking, manufacturing, commerce, and finance. Saint Jacques Street


commercial buildings

, the financial sector, justice and the municipal government helped maintain activity until the Great Depression began in 1929. The relocation of port facilities further east deprived Old Montreal of many companies related to the maritime trade, leaving many abandoned warehouses and commercial buildings. The downtown-area relocation several blocks north and the nearly-complete absence of residents (there were only a few hundred in 1950) had the effect of emptying the district at the close of business


work building

Metro) Atwater and Lucien-L'Allier (Lucien-L'Allier (Montreal Metro)) metro stations. Stretching for over two kilometres along the St-Lawrence River in Old Montreal, the '''Old Port Of Montreal''' has been the social, economic and cultural soul of Montreal ever since early French (France) fur traders used it as a trading post in 1611. It was here that the city and the port came to life more than 350 years ago. History At the Immaculate Conception Centre, a circus school begins to attract young artists interested in theatrical acrobatics. A real passion for all circus arts develops, training expands. Programming evolves as students of various backgrounds come together, united by a firm intention to become true circus artists. Very soon the Immaculate Conception Centre can no longer contain the rapid growth of the National Circus School (NCS). In 1989 the School moved to the Dalhousie station facilities in Old Montreal. The only institution to offer professional circus teaching in North America, the NCS has become one of the world's major circus schools.

Old Montreal

'''Old Montreal''' (French (French language): ''Vieux-Montréal'') is the oldest area in the city of Montreal, Quebec, Canada, with few remains dating back to New France. Located in the borough of Ville-Marie (Ville-Marie (Montreal)), the area is bordered on the west by McGill St. (McGill Street (Montreal)), on the north by ''Ruelle des Fortifications'', on the east by Rue Saint Andre and on the south by the Saint Lawrence River. Following recent amendments, the district has been expanded slightly to include the ''rue des Soeurs Grises'' in the west, Saint Antoine St. (Saint Antoine Street) in the north and Saint Hubert Street in the east. It also includes the Old Port (Old Port of Montreal) of Montreal. Most of Old Montreal was declared an historic district in 1964 by the ''Ministère des Affaires culturelles du Québec''. Old Montreal

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