Oconomowoc, Wisconsin

What is Oconomowoc, Wisconsin known for?


song quot

recorded 22 albums. Her work was inspired by such diverse sources as Joan Baez, Peter, Paul and Mary, and a number of other folk music artists. Friedman employed both English (English language) and Hebrew (Hebrew language) lyrics and wrote for all ages. Some of her songs include "The Aleph Bet Song", "Miriam's Song", and the songs "Not By Might" and "I am a Latke". She also performed in synagogues and concert halls. - '''904''' Oconomowoc (Oconomowoc, Wisconsin) Milwaukee Express Via Hartland (Hartland, Wisconsin) terminating on Wisconsin Ave at Cass St - - '''905''' Oconomowoc (Oconomowoc, Wisconsin) Milwaukee Express Via Delafield (Delafield, Wisconsin) terminating on Wisconsin Ave at Cass St - Geography Stone Bank is situated about 4.5 miles northeast of the city of Oconomowoc (Oconomowoc, Wisconsin) along Waukesha County Highways K and C. It is on the north shore of Okauchee Lake and also has extensive shorelines with Moose Lake. Edwin J. Randall, suffragan bishop Edwin Jarvis Randall (October 24, 1869, Oconomowoc, WI (Oconomowoc, Wisconsin) – June 13, 1962, Evanston, IL (Evanston, Illinois)) location_country location Oconomowoc, Wisconsin, U.S. (United States) locations 40 '''State Trunk Highway 16''' (often called '''Highway 16''', '''STH 16''' or '''WIS 16''') is a Wisconsin state highway running from Pewaukee (Pewaukee, Wisconsin) across the state to La Crosse (La Crosse, Wisconsin). Much of its route in the state parallels the former mainline of the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad (Milwaukee Road). The route parallels I-90 (Interstate 90 in Wisconsin) or I-94 (Interstate 94 in Wisconsin) for most of its length in the state. It serves local traffic in nearby cities including La Crosse (La Crosse, Wisconsin), Tomah (Tomah, Wisconsin), Wisconsin Dells (Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin), Portage (Portage, Wisconsin), Columbus (Columbus, Wisconsin), Watertown (Watertown, Wisconsin), Oconomowoc (Oconomowoc, Wisconsin) and Waukesha (Waukesha, Wisconsin). The highway is mainly two-lane surface road or urban multilane expressway from La Crosse to Oconomowoc, and is a freeway east of Oconomowoc. Oconomowoc bypass The alignment of the eastern section of Highway 16 changed in late 2006 when the rest of the Oconomowoc (Oconomowoc, Wisconsin) bypass was opened to traffic. The four-lane, limited access divided highway routes Highway 16 around Lac La Belle on the west side of the city, meeting up with Highway 67 (Highway 67 (Wisconsin)) north of downtown. Eventually, the bypass will result in the removal of the state highway designation from Wisconsin Avenue through downtown Oconomowoc (Oconomowoc, Wisconsin). - 50 Oconomowoc (Oconomowoc, Wisconsin) 15,759 12,382 City (Political_subdivisions_of_Wisconsin#City) Waukesha (Waukesha County, Wisconsin) -


quot early

Juneau , one of the founders of Milwaukee. Wally Moyle and M.T.R., "A Junior Historian's Draper Inquiry," ''The Wisconsin Magazine of History'' 36, no. 3 (1953), 205. Vicau established a trading post in 1827. W.O. Roberts, "Early Days in Oconomowoc", Oconomowoc Free Press (October 29, 1904). White settlers soon followed beginning in 1830. In April 1837, New York native Charles Sheldon staked a 160-acre claim on the east shore of what is now Fowler Lake, registering it with the Land Bank of Milwaukee on April 21, 1837. A few days later, H.W. Blanchard acquired a claim adjacent to that of Sheldon on the other side of the lake, which he later sold off to Philo Brewer. Brewer constructed what some consider to be the first residence within Oconomowoc's current legal limits, a site now located at 517 N. Lake Road, between La Belle and Fowler lakes. The first recorded birth was of Eliza Jane Dewey on 19 January 1840, in the lodgings above a chair factory located at 116 N. Walnut. Jean Lindsay Johnson, ''Illustrious Oconomowoc'' (Franklin Publishers, 1978), 13. The first recorded death was that of Jerusha Foster, who died somewhere between the ages of 30 and 36 on March 19, 1841. Initially buried at Zion Church point, she was eventually re-interred at Nashotah Mission. Newnham, Mary. 1915. "Eighty Odd Years Ago: Reminiscences of Oconomowoc and Vicinity", worldmapsonline.com; accessed January 22, 2015. Oconomowoc was incorporated as a town in 1844, although residents had to go to Summit (Summit, Waukesha County, Wisconsin) to get their mail until 1845. Barbara Barquist and David Barquist, "Oconomowoc," in ''The Summit of Oconomowoc: 150 Years of Summit Town'' (Summit History Group, 1987), p. 57. Travel and communication links between the new town and nearby cities were quickly established. The Watertown Plank Road (Milwaukee-Watertown Plank Road) was extended to connect Oconomowoc to the nearby towns of Milwaukee, Waukesha, Pewaukee, and Watertown in 1850. Such infrastructure encouraged further settlement, and by 1853 the town grew to a population of 250, with ten stores, three hotels, one gristmill and one sawmill (both located near the present Lake Road bridge), and a schoolhouse. Wisconsin Historical Society, "Oconomowoc: A Brief History" (2009); accessed January 22, 2015. The first passenger train from Milwaukee arrived in Oconomowoc on December 14, 1854, as part of the Milwaukee and Watertown Railroad Company's rapidly expanding Milwaukee & Mississippi line. Axel Lorenzsonn, ''Steam & Cinders: The Advent of Railroads in Wisconsin'' (Wisconsin Historical Society, 2010), p. 187. In the 1870s, Oconomowoc started to became a summer resort-town for wealthy families from across the Midwest. Large houses were soon established around the town's lakes, particularly Oconomowoc Lake and Lac La Belle. The population grew so much that Oconomowoc changed from town to city in 1875, and, by 1880, had a population of 3,000. In 2003, Oconomowoc acquired Pabst Farms from the Town of Summit. Pabst Farms, which had previously been owned by the Pabst family, is being developed as a mixture of commercial and residential property. On April 2, 2008, a gas line exploded just west of downtown, destroying the First Baptist Church on West Wisconsin Avenue. The church, which was built in 1913, was completely destroyed, except for its bell tower frame. The cause of the explosion was from an old capped off gas line (capped in 1972–73 some time) collapsing due to a construction machine as utility work was being done on Wisconsin Avenue in preparation for reconstruction of the street. '''State Trunk Highway 16''' (often called '''Highway 16''', '''STH 16''' or '''WIS 16''') is a Wisconsin state highway running from Pewaukee (Pewaukee, Wisconsin) across the state to La Crosse (La Crosse, Wisconsin). Much of its route in the state parallels the former mainline of the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad (Milwaukee Road). The route parallels I-90 (Interstate 90 in Wisconsin) or I-94 (Interstate 94 in Wisconsin) for most of its length in the state. It serves local traffic in nearby cities including La Crosse (La Crosse, Wisconsin), Tomah (Tomah, Wisconsin), Wisconsin Dells (Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin), Portage (Portage, Wisconsin), Columbus (Columbus, Wisconsin), Watertown (Watertown, Wisconsin), Oconomowoc (Oconomowoc, Wisconsin) and Waukesha (Waukesha, Wisconsin). The highway is mainly two-lane surface road or urban multilane expressway from La Crosse to Oconomowoc, and is a freeway east of Oconomowoc. Oconomowoc bypass The alignment of the eastern section of Highway 16 changed in late 2006 when the rest of the Oconomowoc (Oconomowoc, Wisconsin) bypass was opened to traffic. The four-lane, limited access divided highway routes Highway 16 around Lac La Belle on the west side of the city, meeting up with Highway 67 (Highway 67 (Wisconsin)) north of downtown. Eventually, the bypass will result in the removal of the state highway designation from Wisconsin Avenue through downtown Oconomowoc (Oconomowoc, Wisconsin). - 50 Oconomowoc (Oconomowoc, Wisconsin) 15,759 12,382 City (Political_subdivisions_of_Wisconsin#City) Waukesha (Waukesha County, Wisconsin) -


early songs

, Waterford (Waterford, Wisconsin), Waukesha (Waukesha, Wisconsin), West Bend (West Bend, Wisconsin), Whitewater (Whitewater, Wisconsin), Williams Bay (Williams Bay, Wisconsin), Wilmot (Wilmot, Wisconsin), Woodworth (Woodworth, Wisconsin), and Zenda (Zenda, Wisconsin) She wrote many of her early songs as a song leader at the overnight camp Olin-Sang-Ruby Union Institute (Union for Reform Judaism#Camps) in Oconomowoc, Wisconsin, in the early 1970s. Between 1971 and 2010 she recorded 22 albums. Her work was inspired by such diverse sources as Joan Baez, Peter, Paul and Mary, and a number of other folk music artists. Friedman employed both English (English language) and Hebrew (Hebrew language) lyrics and wrote for all ages. Some of her songs include "The Aleph Bet Song", "Miriam's Song", and the songs "Not By Might" and "I am a Latke". She also performed in synagogues and concert halls. - '''904''' Oconomowoc (Oconomowoc, Wisconsin) Milwaukee Express Via Hartland (Hartland, Wisconsin) terminating on Wisconsin Ave at Cass St - - '''905''' Oconomowoc (Oconomowoc, Wisconsin) Milwaukee Express Via Delafield (Delafield, Wisconsin) terminating on Wisconsin Ave at Cass St - Geography Stone Bank is situated about 4.5 miles northeast of the city of Oconomowoc (Oconomowoc, Wisconsin) along Waukesha County Highways K and C. It is on the north shore of Okauchee Lake and also has extensive shorelines with Moose Lake. Edwin J. Randall, suffragan bishop Edwin Jarvis Randall (October 24, 1869, Oconomowoc, WI (Oconomowoc, Wisconsin) – June 13, 1962, Evanston, IL (Evanston, Illinois)) location_country location Oconomowoc, Wisconsin, U.S. (United States) locations 40 '''State Trunk Highway 16''' (often called '''Highway 16''', '''STH 16''' or '''WIS 16''') is a Wisconsin state highway running from Pewaukee (Pewaukee, Wisconsin) across the state to La Crosse (La Crosse, Wisconsin). Much of its route in the state parallels the former mainline of the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad (Milwaukee Road). The route parallels I-90 (Interstate 90 in Wisconsin) or I-94 (Interstate 94 in Wisconsin) for most of its length in the state. It serves local traffic in nearby cities including La Crosse (La Crosse, Wisconsin), Tomah (Tomah, Wisconsin), Wisconsin Dells (Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin), Portage (Portage, Wisconsin), Columbus (Columbus, Wisconsin), Watertown (Watertown, Wisconsin), Oconomowoc (Oconomowoc, Wisconsin) and Waukesha (Waukesha, Wisconsin). The highway is mainly two-lane surface road or urban multilane expressway from La Crosse to Oconomowoc, and is a freeway east of Oconomowoc. Oconomowoc bypass The alignment of the eastern section of Highway 16 changed in late 2006 when the rest of the Oconomowoc (Oconomowoc, Wisconsin) bypass was opened to traffic. The four-lane, limited access divided highway routes Highway 16 around Lac La Belle on the west side of the city, meeting up with Highway 67 (Highway 67 (Wisconsin)) north of downtown. Eventually, the bypass will result in the removal of the state highway designation from Wisconsin Avenue through downtown Oconomowoc (Oconomowoc, Wisconsin). - 50 Oconomowoc (Oconomowoc, Wisconsin) 15,759 12,382 City (Political_subdivisions_of_Wisconsin#City) Waukesha (Waukesha County, Wisconsin) -


family size

married couples (Marriage) living together, 8.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.5% had a male householder with no wife present, and 31.7% were non-families. 27.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 3.04. The median age in the city was 38.6 years. 26.3% of residents were under the age of 18; 5.4% were between the ages of 18

household size was 2.40 and the average family size was 2.98. In the city the population was spread out with 24.7% under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 29.5% from 25 to 44, 21.7% from 45 to 64, and 16.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 89.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.5 males. The median income for a household in the city was $71,162, and the median income for a family was $89,233. Males had


wally

Juneau , one of the founders of Milwaukee. Wally Moyle and M.T.R., "A Junior Historian's Draper Inquiry," ''The Wisconsin Magazine of History'' 36, no. 3 (1953), 205. Vicau established a trading post in 1827. W.O. Roberts, "Early Days in Oconomowoc", Oconomowoc Free Press (October 29, 1904). White settlers soon followed beginning in 1830. In April 1837, New York native Charles Sheldon staked a 160-acre claim on the east shore


view amp

Street to the current La Belle Cemetery grounds. Sister cities * Dietzenbach, Germany people * John M. Alberts – Wisconsin State Assemblyman

http: www.webcitation.org 60EcIG2Ml archivedate July 16, 2011 deadurl no * Steven Foti – Wisconsin politician http: www.wisconsinhistory.org dictionary index.asp?action view&term_id 1899&search&term foti * Byron L. Johnson – U.S. Representative from Colorado

1741&locid 180 title Who is Rebecca Kleefisch? archiveurl http: www.webcitation.org 5zM4Os71c archivedate June 11, 2011 accessdate June 11, 2011 quote Rebecca and Joel live in Oconomowoc. * Harry G. Snyder – Wisconsin State Assemblyman and Wisconsin Court of Appeals Judge


people amp

Street to the current La Belle Cemetery grounds. Sister cities * '''State Trunk Highway 16''' (often called '''Highway 16''', '''STH 16''' or '''WIS 16''') is a Wisconsin state highway running from Pewaukee (Pewaukee, Wisconsin) across the state to La Crosse (La Crosse, Wisconsin). Much of its route in the state parallels the former mainline of the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad (Milwaukee Road). The route parallels I-90 (Interstate 90 in Wisconsin) or I-94 (Interstate 94 in Wisconsin) for most of its length in the state. It serves local traffic in nearby cities including La Crosse (La Crosse, Wisconsin), Tomah (Tomah, Wisconsin), Wisconsin Dells (Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin), Portage (Portage, Wisconsin), Columbus (Columbus, Wisconsin), Watertown (Watertown, Wisconsin), Oconomowoc (Oconomowoc, Wisconsin) and Waukesha (Waukesha, Wisconsin). The highway is mainly two-lane surface road or urban multilane expressway from La Crosse to Oconomowoc, and is a freeway east of Oconomowoc. Oconomowoc bypass The alignment of the eastern section of Highway 16 changed in late 2006 when the rest of the Oconomowoc (Oconomowoc, Wisconsin) bypass was opened to traffic. The four-lane, limited access divided highway routes Highway 16 around Lac La Belle on the west side of the city, meeting up with Highway 67 (Highway 67 (Wisconsin)) north of downtown. Eventually, the bypass will result in the removal of the state highway designation from Wisconsin Avenue through downtown Oconomowoc (Oconomowoc, Wisconsin). - 50 Oconomowoc (Oconomowoc, Wisconsin) 15,759 12,382 City (Political_subdivisions_of_Wisconsin#City) Waukesha (Waukesha County, Wisconsin) -


popular culture

two middle schools, Silver Lake and Nature Hill Intermediate school, which serve students in 5th through 8th grades. These opened for the 2008–2009 year, replacing the older Oconomowoc Middle School. All schools are part of the Oconomowoc Area School District (OASD). Popular culture * ''The Wizard of Oz (The Wizard of Oz (1939 film))'' premiered at the Strand Theatre in Oconomowoc on August 12, 1939.


262

utc_offset1_DST coordinates_display inline,title coordinates_type region:US_type:city latd latm lats latNS longd longm longs longEW postal_code_type postal_code area_code 262 (Area code 262) website oconomowoc-wi.gov '''Oconomowoc''' is a city in Waukesha


current legal

of what is now Fowler Lake, registering it with the Land Bank of Milwaukee on April 21, 1837. A few days later, H.W. Blanchard acquired a claim adjacent to that of Sheldon on the other side of the lake, which he later sold off to Philo Brewer. Brewer constructed what some consider to be the first residence within Oconomowoc's current legal limits, a site now located at 517 N. Lake Road, between La Belle and Fowler lakes. The first recorded birth was of Eliza Jane Dewey on 19 January 1840, in the lodgings above a chair factory located at 116 N. Walnut. Jean Lindsay Johnson, ''Illustrious Oconomowoc'' (Franklin Publishers, 1978), 13. The first recorded death was that of Jerusha Foster, who died somewhere between the ages of 30 and 36 on March 19, 1841. Initially buried at Zion Church point, she was eventually re-interred at Nashotah Mission. Newnham, Mary. 1915. "Eighty Odd Years Ago: Reminiscences of Oconomowoc and Vicinity", worldmapsonline.com; accessed January 22, 2015. Oconomowoc was incorporated as a town in 1844, although residents had to go to Summit (Summit, Waukesha County, Wisconsin) to get their mail until 1845. Barbara Barquist and David Barquist, "Oconomowoc," in ''The Summit of Oconomowoc: 150 Years of Summit Town'' (Summit History Group, 1987), p. 57. Travel and communication links between the new town and nearby cities were quickly established. The Watertown Plank Road (Milwaukee-Watertown Plank Road) was extended to connect Oconomowoc to the nearby towns of Milwaukee, Waukesha, Pewaukee, and Watertown in 1850. Such infrastructure encouraged further settlement, and by 1853 the town grew to a population of 250, with ten stores, three hotels, one gristmill and one sawmill (both located near the present Lake Road bridge), and a schoolhouse. Wisconsin Historical Society, "Oconomowoc: A Brief History" (2009); accessed January 22, 2015. The first passenger train from Milwaukee arrived in Oconomowoc on December 14, 1854, as part of the Milwaukee and Watertown Railroad Company's rapidly expanding Milwaukee & Mississippi line. Axel Lorenzsonn, ''Steam & Cinders: The Advent of Railroads in Wisconsin'' (Wisconsin Historical Society, 2010), p. 187. In the 1870s, Oconomowoc started to became a summer resort-town for wealthy families from across the Midwest. Large houses were soon established around the town's lakes, particularly Oconomowoc Lake and Lac La Belle. The population grew so much that Oconomowoc changed from town to city in 1875, and, by 1880, had a population of 3,000. In 2003, Oconomowoc acquired Pabst Farms from the Town of Summit. Pabst Farms, which had previously been owned by the Pabst family, is being developed as a mixture of commercial and residential property. On April 2, 2008, a gas line exploded just west of downtown, destroying the First Baptist Church on West Wisconsin Avenue. The church, which was built in 1913, was completely destroyed, except for its bell tower frame. The cause of the explosion was from an old capped off gas line (capped in 1972–73 some time) collapsing due to a construction machine as utility work was being done on Wisconsin Avenue in preparation for reconstruction of the street. '''State Trunk Highway 16''' (often called '''Highway 16''', '''STH 16''' or '''WIS 16''') is a Wisconsin state highway running from Pewaukee (Pewaukee, Wisconsin) across the state to La Crosse (La Crosse, Wisconsin). Much of its route in the state parallels the former mainline of the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad (Milwaukee Road). The route parallels I-90 (Interstate 90 in Wisconsin) or I-94 (Interstate 94 in Wisconsin) for most of its length in the state. It serves local traffic in nearby cities including La Crosse (La Crosse, Wisconsin), Tomah (Tomah, Wisconsin), Wisconsin Dells (Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin), Portage (Portage, Wisconsin), Columbus (Columbus, Wisconsin), Watertown (Watertown, Wisconsin), Oconomowoc (Oconomowoc, Wisconsin) and Waukesha (Waukesha, Wisconsin). The highway is mainly two-lane surface road or urban multilane expressway from La Crosse to Oconomowoc, and is a freeway east of Oconomowoc. Oconomowoc bypass The alignment of the eastern section of Highway 16 changed in late 2006 when the rest of the Oconomowoc (Oconomowoc, Wisconsin) bypass was opened to traffic. The four-lane, limited access divided highway routes Highway 16 around Lac La Belle on the west side of the city, meeting up with Highway 67 (Highway 67 (Wisconsin)) north of downtown. Eventually, the bypass will result in the removal of the state highway designation from Wisconsin Avenue through downtown Oconomowoc (Oconomowoc, Wisconsin). - 50 Oconomowoc (Oconomowoc, Wisconsin) 15,759 12,382 City (Political_subdivisions_of_Wisconsin#City) Waukesha (Waukesha County, Wisconsin) -

Oconomowoc, Wisconsin

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